Tagged: Christine Ebersole

Summary: 
The story of Alana Kane and Gary Valentine growing up, running around and going through the treacherous navigation of first love in the San Fernando Valley, 1973.

Year: 2021

Cinema Release Dates:  26th December 2021 (Australia), 28th December 2021 (UK), 25th December 2021 (USA)

VOD Release Dates: TBA

Country: USA

Director: Paul Thomas Anderson

Screenwriter: Paul Thomas Anderson

Cast: Henri Abergel (Henri), Emily Althaus (Kiki Page), Pearl Anderson (Sharon), Will Angarola (Kirk), Megumi Anjo (Kimiko), Phil Bray (Don the Bartender), Rogelio Camarillo (Armand), Dan Charlton (Sam Harpoon), Ray Chase (B. Mitch Reed), Joanne Coleman (Alejandra), Tim Conway Jnr. (Vic the Director), Bradley Cooper (Jon Peters), Joseph Cross (Matthew), George DiCaprio (Mr. Jack), Emma Dumont (Airplane Brenda), Christine Ebersole (Lucy Doolittle), Mary Elizabeth Ellis (Momma Anita), Griff Giacchino (Mark), Skyler Gisondo (Lance Brannigan), Greg Goetzman (Jerry Best), Alana Haim (Alana), Danieele Haim (Danielle), Donna Haim (Donna), Este Haim (Este), Moti Haim (Moti), Iyana Halley (Wig Shop Brenda), Harriet Sansom Harris (Mary Grady), Ryan Heffington (Steve), Milo Herschlag (Greg), Zoe Herschlag (Wendi Jo), John Michael Higgins (Jerry Frick), Cooper Hoffman (Gary), James F. Kelley (Tim), Lori Killam (Janice), Isabelle Kusman (Sue Pomerantz), Nate Mann (Brian), Ted McCarthy (Waterbed Ted), Max Mitchell (William), Yumi Mizui (Mioko), Ray Nicholson (Ray), Sean Penn (Jack Holden), Eloy Perez (Guillermo), John C. Reilly (Fred Gwynne/Herman Munster), Luigi Della Ripa (Luigi the Taylor), Maya Rudolph (Gale), Benny Safdie (Joel Wachs), Destry Allen Spielberg (Frisbee Kahill), Tom Waits (Rex Blau)

Running Time: 133 mins

Classification: M (Australia), 15 (UK), R (USA)

OUR LICORICE PIZZA REVIEWS

David Griffiths’ LicoricePizza Review:

I have always been a big sucker for a good coming of age story. Whether it be one with a difference like Acolytes or one that is a little more traditional like Almost Famous I always find them intriguing to watch because I feel that it is the one genre that every filmmaker can put a little bit of themselves into… after all we were all teenagers once.

It was because of that intrigue that my interest was sparked when I discovered that director Paul Thomas Anderson (Magnolia) was making a coming-of-age film. Anderson has been a director that I have felt to drawn to ever since I obtained a VHS copy of Boogie Nights. He has a style of filmmaking that fascinates me – a style that reminds me of the reason why I fell in love with cinema in the first place. He doesn’t go for over the top action or set pieces instead he likes to capture the environment in which the film is set and tell a good story while he has his audience immersed within it.

His latest film, Licorice Pizza, puts his audience in a time machine and takes them back to the early 70s to a time when kids had the freedom to dream without the pressures of social media and the likes that we endure today.

Anderson’s hero is Gary (first time actor Cooper Hoffman) a teenager who has made a career for himself as a child actor. From the money he has earned from that he has set up a small business which sees him sell whatever fad is in fashion at that time… or do anything that he sees will make him money.

Then when day at his school he meets school photography assistant Alana (first time actress Alana Haim), a woman that he says he instantly knows is the woman that he wants to marry one day.

However being older than Gary Alana decides that she is not as eager for a relationship as he is and instead seems to take pleasure stringing him along as she tries to enhance her own career in a number of ways including getting close to a crazy actor and his film directing buddy and then even delving into politics in the hope of getting closer to the political candidate.

Meanwhile Gary goes from scheme to scheme doing whatever he can to try and get Alana involved so she can be close to him.

I can be honest and say that this is not the kind of film that the average pop-corn film fan is going to enjoy, Anderson’s films rarely are. Instead I found what he has created here is a film that seems to take on the feel of the TV show The Wonder Years but mix it with the quirkiness that seems to come with Anderson’s films.

One of the thrills that I found with this film is the fact that with Anderson’s style of filmmaking you never really know what to expect next. One moment the characters are going along their merry way and the next one is being arrested. With that sense of unpredictability you can’t but at times wonder if the characters that you are being drawn closer to, especially when it seems like Alana is playing a dangerous game of flirtation with the likes of the crazy Jack Holden (Sean Penn – Milk) who are unpredictable at best.

Likewise as an audience you find yourself wondering whether these guys that Alana is drawing into her life and going to one day have a problem with Gary. The suspense around things like that at times seems to outweigh the suspense around whether or not Gary or Alana will eventually get together or not.

Then there are the quirky characters that appear throughout this film that not only make the story move along but often bring a smile to your face as well. The king of that here is Jon Peters (Bradley Cooper – A Star Is Born), an unhinged actor who comes into Alana and Gary’s world when they deliver a waterbed to his home. Every minute that Cooper is on the screen is a scream and he steals the show with a brilliant performance.

That is not to take anything from the two leads that Anderson has plucked from acting obscurity. Cooper Hoffman, the son of late actor Philip Seymour Hoffman, has the same commanding performance that his father had while singer turned actress Alana Haim is a natural performer. Both of which may have been unheard of before this film but they certainly won’t be after its release.

Licorice Pizza is the kind of film for people that like a serious film with slight pieces of quirky humour throughout. It is the kind of film where you find yourself being drawn closer and closer to the characters on the screen despite the fact that sometimes their actions frustrate you. This is one for the true cinemaphile.

Dave’s rating Out Of 5

Average Subculture Rating:

Other Subculture Licorice Pizza Reviews:

Nil

Trailer:

The Wolf Of Wall Street

Summary: Jordan Belfort (DiCaprio) is the son of an accountant, hoping to make it big on Wall Street as a stockbroker. Following the crash of 1987 Belfort reinvents himself with the help of Donnie Azoff (Jonah Hill) and close group of unscrupulous friends, starting brokerage firm Stratton Oakmont. Rapidly becoming wealthy beyond his wildest dreams, Belfort develops a hard-partying lifestyle that soon attracts the attention of federal government.

Year: 2014

Australian Cinema Release Date: 23rd January, 2014

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: Australia

Director: Martin Scorsese

Screenwriter: Terence Winter, Jordan Belfort (book)

Cast: Ashlie Atkinson (Rochelle Applebaum), Jon Bernthal (Brad), Loretta O. Booz (Wendy), P.J. Byrne (Nicky ‘Rugrat’ Koskoff), Chris Caldovino (Rocco #1), Katarina Cas (Chantalle), Aya Cash (Janet), Kyle Chandler (Agent Patrick Denham), Kenneth Choi (Chester Ming), Robert Clohessy (Nolan Drager), Shea Coleman (Skylar Belfort (14 months old)), Carla Corvo (Pam), Dan Daily (Honorary Raymond Samitz), Leonardo DiCaprio (Jordan Belfort), Bo Dietl (himself), Jean Dujardin (Jean Jacques Saurel), Christine Ebersole (Leah Belfort), Giselle Eisenberg (Skylar Belfort (4 Years Old)), Michael Engberg (Smith), Jon Favreau (Manny Riskin), Danny Flaherty (Zip), Marcus Antonio Gonzalez (Rocco #2), Ted Griffin (Agent Hughes), Jonah Hill (Donnie Azoff), Jake Hoffman (Steve Madden), Christina Jeffs (Venice), Spike Jonze (Dwayne), Dustin Kerns (Ben Jenner), Stephen Kunken (Jerry Fogel), Stephanie Kurtzuba (Kimmie Blezer), Aaron Lazar (Blair Hollingsworth), Ben Leasure (Brantley), Fran Lebowitz (Honorary Samantha Stogel), Joanna Lumley (Aunt Emma), J.C. MacKenzie (Lucas Soloman), Johnnie Mae (Violet), Rizwan Manji (Kalil), Matthew McConaughey (Mark Hanna), Madison McKinley (Heidi), Mackenzie Meehan (Hildy Azoff), Cristin Miliroti (Teresa Petrillo), Ron Nakahara (Rocky Aoki), Michael Nathanson (Barry Kleinman),  Sandra Nelson (Aliyah Farran), Dierdre Reimold (Nicole), Rob Reiner (Max Belfort), Margot Robbie (Naomi Lapaglia), Barry Rothbart (Peter DeBlasio), Brian Sacca (Robbie ‘Pinhead’ Feinberg), Jon Spinogatti (Nicholas the Butler), Ethan Suplee (Toby Welch), Natasha Newman Thomas (Danielle Harrison), Emily Tremaine (Cristy), Shea Whigham (Captain Ted Beecham), Joe Zaso (Bernardo), Henry Zebrowski (Alden ‘Sea Otter’ Kupferberg)

Runtime: 180 mins

Classification:R18+

OUR WOLF OF WALL STREET REVIEWS & RATINGS

Adam Ross: Stars(5)

Please check Adam’s The Wolf Of Wall Street review of that is available on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #65

 

Greg King: Stars(3.5)

Please check Greg’s The Wolf Of Wall Street review of that is available on www.filmreviews.net.au

Nick Gardener: Stars(3.5)

Please check Nick’s The Wolf Of Wall Street review that is available on Southern FM

David Griffiths:

First I do have to admit a real bias when I am reviewing The Wolf Of Wall Street – I am an avid Martin Scorsese film and also an avid Leonardo DiCaprio, yes I have been in heaven for the past few years while they are collaborated together on five films. And yes while films such as Shutter Island and The Departed would make my ‘Greatest Films Ever Made’ list, I am not biased enough to admit that these two have made some ordinary films together, especially The Aviator.

So where does The Wolf Of Wall Street fit on the Leonardo DiCaprio/Martin Scorsese scale. Well to be honest it is pretty bloody high up, because this is a good… no make that… great film. But to preface that I should say this film does go above and beyond to get its R18+ rating because Scorsese has pretty much made a film about a world of sleaze.

Under Scorsese’s wonderful direction DiCaprio plays Jordan Belfort, a young man who is introduced into the world of Wall Street finance by the ‘out there’ Mark Hanna (Matthew McCounaughey) who teaches Jordan the things he needs to succeed are cash, drugs and sex… and that you get them anyway you can.

Jordan’s first journey into Wall Street though doesn’t last after the crash of 1987 and soon Hanna disappears out of the picture and Jordan is left to resurrect himself, this time through a backyard operation that pretty much just sells worthless penny deals. But Jordan sees promise in that and soon he, and his new found buddy the loud Donnie Azoff (Jonah Hill), begin their new operation that has the sole aim of making them money.

Once Jordan is once again wealthy he again reaches Wall Street doing illegal deal after illegal deal while his weaknesses are still cash, drugs and sex… this time with his future wife, the beautiful Naomi Lapaglia (Margot Robbie). Everything is going well until a Federal Agent (played by Kyle Chandler) starts sniffing around Jordan and aims to bring him down.

With The Wolf Of Wall Street Scorsese is once again at the top of his game. He is cunning with the way that he tells this story – yes at times he glorifies the sick lifestyle that Jordan lives, but he also dramatically shows the downside of this lifestyle to the point where anybody watching the film would be an idiot to want to get involved in the finance world. At times Jordan appears to be a God, but that image is shattered when Scorsese allows the grime to reach the surface in shocking acts such as seeing Jordan punch his wife in the stomach. Those that criticize The Wolf Of Wall Street and point out that Scorsese is trying to glorify this film are on the wrong track completely because he is trying to do anything but that.

The critics that have pointed out that Scorsese goes back and reuses some of his old Goodfellas style are right, but always the inventor Scorsese also uses comedy to full affect in The Wolf Of Wall Street… perhaps to give his audience a rest from the onslaught, while he is also creative in the way that he allows Jordan to narrate this film, especially in the sense that Jordan seems to be able to pick and choose what he feels the audience will understand. He may be in his seventies but at least Scorsese is still a director willing to try new things.

Once again Scorsese also gets the best out of Leonardo DiCaprio. Just like he did in Django Unchained DiCaprio relishes the fact that he gets to play an unlikable character here and he is well deserved of all the awards he has been nominated for. But this isn’t just the DiCaprio show, oh no Matthew McConaughey steals the show with his brief performance, Kyle Chandler is once again smooth in his role while Jonah Hill provides more than just comedic relief showing that he is a genuine dramatic actor these days. However the person that deserves a big tick for The Wolf Of Wall Street is Australian actress Margot Robbie who shows that she is more than just a pretty face and delivers some intense acting during her sometimes vicious scenes with DiCaprio. Yes she well and truly deserves her ‘star on the rise’ label.

As previously mentioned The Wolf Of Wall Street is not a film that will be enjoyed by all. It is a powerful, and yes at times graphic film. It may be a little long (some of the scenes wouldn’t have suffered if the editor had been a bit more brutal) but this film once again shows why Martin Scorsese is a living legend when it comes to filmmaking.

Stars(4)  

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5): Stars(4)

IMDB Rating:  The Wolf of Wall Street (2013) on IMDb

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘The Wolf Of Wall Street′: Please check The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #65 for our full The Wolf Of Wall Street review.

Trailer:

The Big Wedding

Summary: To the amusement of their adult children and friends, long divorced couple Don and Ellie Griffin (De Niro and Keaton) are once again forced to play the happy couple for the sake of their adopted son’s wedding after his ultra conservative biological mother unexpectedly decides to fly halfway across the world to attend. With all of the wedding guests looking on, the Griffins are hilariously forced to confront their past, present and future – and hopefully avoid killing each other in the process.

Year: 2013

Australian Cinema Release Date: 2nd May, 2013

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA

Director: Justin Zackham

Screenwriter: Justin Zackham, Jean-Stephane Bron (original script), Karine Sudan (original script)

Cast: Ana Ayora (Nuria), Ben Barnes (Alejandro), Marc Blucas (Andrew), Kyle Bornheimer (Andrew), Christa Campbell (Kim), Robert De Niro (Don), Quincy Dunn-Baker (Kevin), Christine Ebersole (Muffin), Topher Grace (Jared), Katherine Heigl (Lyla), Diane Keaton (Ellie), Megan Ketch (Jane), Patricia Rae (Madonna), David Rasche (Barry), Susan Sarandon (Bebe), Amanda Seyfried (Missy), Robin Williams (Father Moinighan)

Runtime: 89 mins

Classification:MA15+

Dave Griffiths’s ‘The Big Wedding’ Review: Please check Dave’s review of ‘The Big Wedding’ that is available on the Helium Entertainment Channel.

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘TheBig Wedding′: Check Episode #30 of our The Good The Bad The Ugly Podcast for a more in-depth review of ‘The Big Wedding’.

Rating: 3/5

IMDB Rating:The Big Wedding (2013) on IMDb