Monthly Archives: September 2015

The Subjects

Australian filmmaker Robert Mond is back with his brand new film The Subjects which will become available on VOD on the 8th October.

The film which stars Pip Mushin, Spencer McLaren, Emily Wheaton, Charlotte Nicdao, Frank Magree, Paul O’Brien, Katharine Innes, Tosh Greenslade and Paul Henri is already getting some great reviews and is shaping up to be one film not to be missed.

Subculture Entertainment is pleased to be able to giveaway a double pass to a special screening of The Subjects in Sydney on October 7th. So if you are in Sydney and would like to see The Subjects simply hit us up on Facebook and tell us which Australian drama set in St Kilda did Spencer McLaren once star in.

That’s all it takes to enter our The Subjects giveaway.

The Pack

With the great new Australian horror film The Pack just being released by Eagle Entertainment on VOD and DVD Subculture Entertainment’s Dave Griffiths decided to catch up with leading man Jack Campbell to talk about what it was like working on the film, his favourite cult films and whether or not he could survice a canine attack.

You can listen to or download our The Pack – Jack Campbell interview right here.

Jennifer Kingwell Ninth Wave

It is the 30th anniversary of Kate Bush’s legendary Hounds Of Love album and Melbourne singer-songwriter Jennifer Kingwell has put together a special tribute called The Ninth Wave. Jennifer chats to Subculture Entertainment’s Dave Griffiths about her love for Kate Bush and what exactley fans can expect to see at The Ninth Wave.

You can listen to or download our Jennifer Kingwell interview right here.

 

The Ninth Wave

TICKETS ON SALE WEDNESDAY 16 SEPTEMBER at http://bit.ly/ninthwave
Venue: Howler, 7-11 Dawson St, Brunswick
Date & time: Thursday 29 October, doors at 8pm
Tix: $15 + BF from Moshtix at http://bit.ly/ninthwave

Victor Kennedy You Yangs

With Victor Kennedy You Yangs about to release a brand new single and album called Ride The Blizzard Subculture Entertainment’s Dave Griffiths decided to catch up with Victor Kennedy to find out how such an amazing single came into being.

You can listen to or download our Victor Kennedy interview right here.

Wes Snelling

With Comedy 4 Karma just around the corner Subculture Entertainment’s Dave Griffiths caught up with the MC of the night Wes Snelling.

You can listen to or download our Wes Snelling interview right here.

 

COMEDY FOR KARMA
Sammy J & Randy, Celia Pacquola, Tony Martin
MC Tina Del Twist
(one more act announced soon)
Pre-show live music from Melody Moon
Fundraising for Daylesford Dharma School
Friday 16th October
Daylesford Town Hall
76 Vincent St, Daylesford
Tickets $40 + booking fee
available now via www.dharmaschool.com.au
or on the door if not sold out
Doors open 7pm for 8pm start

For more information go to :
www.dharmaschool.com.au
www.facebook.com/DaylesfordDharmaSchool

Cut Snake

Summary: Set in Melbourne in the mid-1970s, Cut Snake tells the story of Sparra Farrell (Alex Russell), an ex-con in his twenties trying to make a life for himself in a new city. He has found honest work and becomes engaged to the beautiful Paula (Jessica De Gouw). But the prospect of his new life is challenged when the charismatic, dangerous Pommie (Sullivan Stapleton) tracks him down. Sparra finds himself drawn back into a world that he thought he had left behind.

Year: 2014

Australian Cinema Release Date: 24th September 2015

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: Australia

Director: Tony Ayres

Screenwriter: Blake Ayshford

Cast: Ricahrd Anastasios (Wayne), Syd Brisbane (Ben), Christopher Bunworth (Mr. McGrath), Jessica De Gouw (Paula), Luke Elliott (Bruce), Megan Holloway (Yvonne), Graham Jahne (Len), Catherine Larcey (May), Paul Moder (Carl), Robert Morgan (Duck), Alex Russell (Sparra Farrell), Jim Russell (Neil), Sullivan Stapleton (Pommie), Brett Swain (Boss), Rosie Traynor (Mrs. McGrath), Antonius Verlaan (Bear), Kerry Walker (Mrs. Farrell)

Runtime: 95 mins

Classification: MA15+

 

OUR CUT SNAKE REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

Greg King:

You can read Greg’s full Cut Snake review on www.filmreviews.net.au

 

 

 

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Nick Gardener:

 

You can hear Nick’s full Cut Snake review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #147

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stars(3.5)

 

 

 

 

 

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5):  Stars(3.5)

 

IMDB Rating: Cut Snake (2014) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment Cut Snake reviews: You can listen to our full Cut Snake  review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #147.

Trailer:

Sicario

Summary: When FBI Agent Kate Macer (Emily Blunt), her partner Reggie (Daniel Kaluuya) and her boss, Jennings (Victor Garber) accidentally uncover a Mexican drug cartel’s house of death Kate suddenly finds herself thrust into a brand new, very dangerous world.

With Jennings’ blessing Kate finds herself recruited to join a black-op mission led by special Agent Matt graver (Josh Brolin) and a Columbian operative known only as Alejandro (Benicio Del Toro). The mission soon sees Kate very much in the middle of the borderland drug war in a word where there seems to be no rules whether you are on the side of good or evil.

Year: 2015

Australian Cinema Release Date: 24th September 2015

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA

Director: Denis Villeneuve

Screenwriter: Taylor Sheridan

Cast: Edgar Arreola (Guillermo), Jon Bernthal (Ted), Emily Blunt (Kate Macer), Josh Brolin (Matt Graver), Julio Cedillo (Fausto Alarcon), Benicio Del Toro (Alejandro), Laurence Scott Deveraux (Alex Driver), Jeffrey Donovan (Steve Forsing), Victor Garber (Dave Jennings), David Garver (Bob Fisks), Maximiliano Hernandez (Silvio), Daniel Kaluuya (Reggie Wayne), Lora Martinez-Cunningham (Jacinta), Jesus Nevarez-Castillo (Eliseo), Hank Rogerson (Phil Coopers), Bernardo P. Saracino (Manuel Diaz), Boots Southerland (U.S. Marshall Keith), Adam Taylor (U.S. Marshall Kevin), Matthew Tompkins (Jessie Garza), Raoul Trujillo (Rafael), Kevin Wiggins (Burnett)

Runtime: 121 mins

Classification: M

 

OUR SICARIO REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

David Griffiths:

No I’m not chucking in my card to the Comic Book And Cult Film Lovers Association but one of the films I was most looking forward to this year was Sicario. Yes I am not too embarrassed to admit that the fact that a certain director is at the helm of a movie is sometimes enough to make me wanna see a film and that was certainly the case here. See to me Denis Villeneuve’s last film was a cinematic masterpiece. I can watch Prisoners over and over again and find something new that I like about each time, add that to the fact that Villeneuve was directing a borderland crime film starring Josh Brolin and yes Sicario had me at hello. My biggest fear for Sicario was that Hollywood would have claimed Villeneuve and that he would decide to rope in his grittiness and harshness, luckily that certainly isn’t the case here.

Many have labeled Sicario a blockbuster for this year, yet that title just doesn’t seem to fit comfortably with this film. This film is harsh, bloody harsh and it’s not hard to see that the popcorn set are going to struggle with the film’s brutal opening in with Kate finds a house that contains more dead bodies than your local morgue. And in typical Villeneuve fashion he doesn’t make it easy watch for its audience, no as he goes in for the close-up on a decaying man’s face you are well and truly aware of the fact that while he is making a Hollywood film he certainly hasn’t been claimed by Hollywood.

Visually Sicario is a blessing. Villeneuve along with DOP Roger Deakins have made this movie look like some kind of modern day western with it’s yellow tinge and cinematic aerial desert shots, and somehow that works wonders with Brolin and Del Toro cruising around like modern day Sherrifs seeking vengeance. Sadly though Sicario’s screenplay isn’t always as good as the visuals the audience are being treated to. Unlike Prisoners this film has some weak points that leave the audience shaking their head, nothing major but little moments like Kate picking up the Police Officer in the bar… isn’t it just too much coincidence that her partner would just happen to be good friends with the guy?

Still there are powerful moments in Sicario, moments that are so powerful that they will stick in your mind for ages. From the fact that this is a very much anti-Mexican tourism video as Villeneuve takes you past bodies hanging from Mexican border-town overpasses to suspenseful scenes such as the border battle which will have any cinema lover watching with baited breath. Then there is the magnificent finale with Del Toro and a dining table… I’m not going to say anything else but that as I don’t want to spoil the film… but hell it is one of the most suspenseful scenes you are going to see in cinema for a long, long time. Adding to the suspense all throughout this film is the pounding soundtrack that simply becomes a character upon itself.

Now you may have heard some people criticize Emily Blunt’s acting performance in Sicario. Don’t believe it. She puts in a great effort and those complaining about her performance are simply looking for something that doesn’t need to be there. Kate is not Lara Croft in a Police uniform. She’s a very innocent but good at her job cop normally used to dealing with hostage situations who suddenly finds herself thrown into a world she just doesn’t understand. Anyone that goes into this film expecting Blunt to be the gun-ho character she was in Edge Of Tomorrow is going to be disappointed, it’s just not what Kate is.

Then there is Brolin and Del Toro who knock their performances out of the park. Brolin is gruff and rough as you expect him to be and is well backed up by Del Toro who has an air of mystery about him from the moment he first appears on the screen here. Some of the Del Toro’s performances have been a little questionable recently (no I still have not recovered from that scene with him, Diaz and a windshield in The Counselor) but here he bounces back with a brutal performance and for once he doesn’t over act his way through it. He’s just on song.

If you’re a fan of Denis Villeneuve’s past films you are certainly not going to be disappointed by Sicario. It is brutal, rough and in-your-face, just the way a crime thriller should be. Brolin and Del Toro bring their A-Games and this is one film that is a must see for 2015.

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Adam Ross:

You can hear Adam’s full Sicario review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #147

 

 

 

Stars(4)

 

 

 

 

Greg King:

You can read Greg’s full Sicario review on www.filmreviews.net.au

 

 

 

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Nick Gardener:

 

You can hear Nick’s full Sicario review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #147

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stars(4)

 

 

 

 

 

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5):  Stars(4)

 

IMDB Rating: Sicario (2015) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment Sicario reviews: You can listen to our full Sicario  review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #147. You can also read our Sicario review on The Book The Film The T-Shirt.

Trailer:

London Road

Summary: Based on actual events London Road looks at the reactions of local residents in a quiet street named London Road in Ipswich whose peaceful neighborhood was at first disturbed by the arrival of prostitutes deciding to sell their trade in their street and then the craziness and fear that resulted after a serial killer murdered five of the woman.

With a script that has dialogue that comes straight from the interviews conducted with the residents over a three year period London Road explores how everyday people such as a taxi driver named Mark (Tom Hardy) and local residents like Dodge (Paul Thornley) and Julie (Olivia Colman) cope with the resulting media and Police circus.

Year: 2015

Australian Cinema Release Date: 24th September 2015

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: UK

Director: Rufus Norris

Screenwriter: Alecky Blythe

Cast: Angela Bain (Kath), Rae Baker (Anglia Newsreader), Jason Barnett (Chris Eakin), Gillian Bevan (Colette McBeth), Clare Burt (Jan), Steve Carroll (Tony – Kerb Crawler), Olivia Colman (Julie), Rosealie Craig (Kelly McCormack), Calvin Demba (Alec), Anita Dobson (June), James Doherty (Seb), Kate Fleetwood (Vicky), Hal Fowler (David Crabtree), Michael Fox (Nightclub Bill), Richard Frame (Jason Photographer), Jenny Galloway (Margaret), Jonathan Glew (Steve Cameraman), Amy Griffiths (Sarah), Anna Hale (Jessica), Tom Hardy (Taxi Driver Mark), Linzi Hateley (Helen), Janet Henfrey (Ivy), Rose Hilal (Hayley), Paul Hilton (Tim), Nick Holder (Ron), Ruby Holder (Stephanie), Philip Howard (Bob), Sean Kinglsey (Alan), Mark Lockyer (Grahame Cooper), Helen Lymbery (Stella), Barry McCarthy (Harry), Jayne McKenna (Imelda), Claire Moore (Counciller Carole), Michael Shaeffer (Simon Newton), Mark Sheals (Wayne), Nicola Sloane (Rosemary), Frank Stone (George – Kerb Crawler), Paul Thornley (Dodge), Morgan Walters (Graeme), Howard Ward (Terry), Duncan Wiseby (Gordon)

Runtime: 91 mins

Classification: M

 

OUR LONDON ROAD REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

David Griffiths:

London Road is not an easy film to talk about because to be brutally honest this is a film that is going to divide cinemagoers like no other film this year. On the one hand London Road is a breath of fresh air in the cinema, a type of film that we haven’t really seen before. But then on the other hand all the things that make it so different are also the things that are going to make this film appeal to a very small audience indeed.

For those not in the know London Road is based on the popular National Theatre production that had critics and audiences raving. Now the name National Theatre shouldn’t be foreign to cinema lovers any more. Over the past few years the theatre company have reached out into cinemas with countless productions that have featured some of cinemas’ biggest names – Danny Boyle directed Jonny Lee Miller and Benedict Cumberbatch in Frankenstein, Kenneth Branagh directed Macbeth and Gillian Anderson starred in A Streetcar Named Desire. With these productions filling cinemas worldwide it is very little wonder that the National Theatre have decided to look at other ways to bring their work to the cinema and the result is London Road, a film that is produced by them, stars most of their actors and is directed by Rufus Norris, a Tony nominated theatre director who has had a few films reach the cinemas over the years as well.

Now this is where things get tricky for London Road. The idea of creating a modern day musical about a spate of prostitute murders is so different to anything we have ever seen before that it is actually something that is worth watching. At times the film does really draw you in but the alternative style of musical theatre that makes up the score never really allows its audience to comfortably forget the fact they are watching a musical. The key to a good musical films – things like Sweeney Todd, Moulin Rouge or Rock Of Ages – is to make the audience forget that most of the dialogue is being delivered in song, but here the fact that the songs often contain the one piece of dialogue used over and over again, and the fact that in trying to make this film feel natural they haven’t selected the best singers in the world means that for the entire film you are conscious of the fact that you are watching a musical.

On the plus side though London Road is different enough that it does draw you in. You genuinely feel sorry for the innocent members of the public that through no fault of their own got swept up in this Ipswich Ripper case and at times the directional hand of Rufus Norris does creatively show things such as how scared young girls were scared to walk down the street or were judging every man they meet. Moments like a radio station capitalizing on the murders by running a promotion giving away personal alarms for women are memorable but the most powerful part of this film is when you start to hear the stories of some of the prostitutes who worked in London Road at the time and the effect that the murders had on them.

Aside from those moments the other thing that works for London Road is the fact that there will be one or two characters that each audience member will warm to and you find yourselves really wanting to go on the journey with them. Dodge played by Paul Thornley is one such character and he is one of the more interesting characters. Unfairly you sometimes wonder if he is the killer because of his appearance and seemingly unhealthy obsession with the prostitutes early on the film, and as a result characters like this become a lot more interesting then people like Mark who you know have only been added to the film to get a big name actor like Tom Hardy into the film. While these appearances are a little unnecessary we do learn rather quickly that it’s a good thing that Nolan didn’t want Hardy to portray a musical version of Bain.

London Road is a film that is only going to be lapped up by a very small clique of audience members. Its musical stylings are a little too alternative for you traditional musical lovers while the film is too musical for lovers of alternative cinema. It’s quite a pickle the film finds itself in, but the core problem is that the filmmakers didn’t seem to realise that audiences are a lot more open to alternative theatre than alternative film. Still London Road is worth a look if you like your cinema on the quirky side and it certainly shouldn’t be described as a bad film.
 

 

Stars(3)

 

 

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5):  Stars(3)

 

IMDB Rating: London Road (2015) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment London Road reviews: You can listen to our full London Road  review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #147. You can also read our London Roadi review on The Book The Film The T-Shirt.

Trailer: