Tagged: Bob Balaban

Summary: 
A love letter to journalists set in an outpost of an American newspaper in a fictional twentieth century French city that brings to life a collection of stories published in “The French Dispatch Magazine”.

Year: 2021

Cinema Release Dates:  9th December 2021 (Australia), 22nd October 2021 (UK), 22nd October 2021 (USA)

VOD Release Dates: TBA

Country: USA, Germany

Director: Wes Anderson

Screenwriter: Wes Anderson

Cast: Mathieu Amalric (The Commissaire), Nicolas Avinee (Vittel), Bob Balaban (Uncle Nick), Mohamed Belhadjine (Mitch-Mitch), Adrien Brody (Julian Cadazio), Timothee Chalamet (Zeffirelli), Mauricette Coudivat (Maman), Willem Dafoe (Albert The Abacus), Cecile de France (Mrs B), Benicio del Toro (Moses Rosenthaler), Guillaume Gallienne (Mr. B), Winston Ait Hellal (Gigi), Tom Hudson (Mitch-Mitch (on stage)), Anjelica Huston (Narrator (voice)), Lyna Khoudri (Juliette), Alex Lawther (Morisot), Frances McDormand (Lucinda Krementz), Elisabeth Moss (Alumna), Bill Murray (Arthur Howitzer Jr.), Edward Norton (The Chauffeur), Steve Park (Nescaffier), Rodolphe Pauly (Patrolman Maupassant), Tony Revolori (Young Rosenthaler), Saoirse Ronan (Junkie/Showgirl #1), Jason Schwartzman (Hermes Jones), Lea Seydoux (Simone), Lois Smith (Upshur ‘Maw’ Clampette), Tilda Swinton (J.K.L. Berensen), Christoph Waltz (Paul Duval), Owen Wilson (Herbsaint Sazerac), Henry Winkler (Uncle Joe), Jeffrey Wright (Roebuck Wright)

Running Time: 107 mins

Classification: M (Australia), 15 (UK), R (USA)

OUR THE FRENCH DISPATCH REVIEWS

David Griffiths’ The French Dispatch Review:

There is always a funny reaction in film circles when you mention the name Wes Anderson. Either the person you are talking to will start to tell you that Anderson is a genius or they will nod and then say “yeah no thanks.”

Yes like a lot of classic things Anderson is an acquired taste and one that people either love and or hate. Myself? Well, I’m in the former category. I fell in love with the work of Mr. Anderson when I discovered The Darjeeling Limited. I loved its quirkiness, I loved how different it was and from then on I was hooked.

If though you are in the other camp then there is no way that you will ever be able to get into The French Dispatch, for me though this is one of the films of the year. Only Anderson could bring together stories like this and have the end result be something as special as this.

The film is pulled together by a fictional magazine known as The French Dispatch who is edited by the forthright but slightly crazy Arthur Howitzer Jnr (Bill Murray – Lost In Translation). He has pulled together a group of eccentric writers including the intrepid Lucinda Krementz (Frances McDormand – Fargo), J.K.L Berensen (Tilda Swinton – Snowpiercer), the cycling crazy Herbsaint Sazerac (Owen Wilson – Wedding Crashers), and food critic Roebuck Wright (Jeffrey Wright – Shaft).

The film itself is made up of the stories they are telling in their articles from a mysterious painter (Benicio Del Toro – Sicario) who is in love with his prison guard (Lea Seydoux – No Time To Die) through the story of opposing revolutionary leaders who are in love with each other.

That is where there are strengths and weaknesses with this film. The film comes together like a bunch of short films with a common theme, and like all short films, there are the good and bad.  The stories such as the one involving the artist and Owen Wilson’s fast-moving trip through a small town are brilliant but some of the others drag. The good news for audiences though is the good ones clearly outweigh the bad ones.

The stroke of Anderson’s genius is on show throughout the film. His quirky humor is always on show throughout the film and I’ll be quick to admit that I found myself laughing throughout the film. The brilliant thing is that humor comes in all forms – from witty one-liners through to visual humor. The best part though is that every joke lands and gets a laugh.

The other highlight for me was the fact that Anderson brings so many different kinds of filmmaking to the game with this film. From animation, through to fast-paced European comedy and then to classic black and white cinema, there isn’t anything Anderson isn’t willing to try and somehow he ends up being a master to them all.

Likewise always with an Anderson film the cast is a case of a who’s who of Hollywood. Actors like Willem Dafoe (The Card Counter) and Edward Norton (Motherless Brooklyn) turn up in a blink and you will miss them roles but it is the stars of this film that steal the show. Owen Wilson steals the show in his all too brief storyline while Benicio Del Toro shines playing an artistic killer trying to paint while locked away in prison.

As in normally the case with Anderson films it is Bill Murray that brings everything together. When it comes to Anderson’s work Murray is the ringmaster and the film his circus. He leads the way and it is obvious no other actor quite enjoys the quirkiness of Anderson’s work the way that Murray does. Having said that though this is an ensemble film where every actor is at the top of their game and the result is yet another classic Anderson film.

If you are not already a fan of Anderson’s work then this isn’t the film that is going to win you over. This film feels like it has been made for the Anderson tragic, it has his tropes all over it and once again the result is something magical. The film is slightly let down by the weaker ‘parts’ but for the most part this is an enjoyable ride.

Dave’s rating Out Of 5

Average Subculture Rating:

Other Subculture The French Dispatch Reviews:

Nil

Trailer:

Fading Gigolo

Summary: Murray (Woody Allen), a New York City bookstore owner, turns to high-class pimping in order to keep financially afloat in face of the imminent closure of his business.

To succeed at the world’s oldest profession, Murray needs a Don Juan. He appeals to his florist friend Fioravante (John Turturro) for assistance and before long, the oddball duo tear up Gotham, with Fioravante (who now goes by Virgil) shtupping eager clients the likes of legendary sexual icons Sharon Stone and Sofia Vergara. Murray’s plan seems fail safe until he introduces Avigal (Vanessa Paradis), a sheltered and lonely orthodox Jewish widow, to Virgil’s mix of clientele. As a deeper connection develops between Virgil and Avigal, Dovi (Liev Schreiber), a vigilant member of the neighborhood’s Jewish police who shares affection for Avigal, develops a fool-proof plan of his own.

Year: 2013

Australian Cinema Release Date: 1st May, 2014

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA

Director: John Turturro

Screenwriter: John Turturro

Cast: Woody Allen (Murray), Bob Balaban (Sol), Delphina Belle (Rhuki), Teddy Bergman (Yossi), Isaiah Clifton (Cyrus), Jade Dixon (Cee Cee), Dante Hoagland (Coco), Aubrey Joseph (Cefus), Ness Krell (Little Devorah), Vanessa Paradis (Avigal), Tonya Pinkins (Othella), Russell Posner (Malky), Liev Schreiber (Dovi), Sharon Stone (Dr. Parker), Ted Sutherland (Shmuel), M’Barka Ben Taleb (Mimou), Diego Turturro (Shimshon), John Turturro (Fioravante), Sofia Vergara (Selima)

Runtime: 90 mins

Classification: M

OUR FADING GIGOLO REVIEWS & RATINGS:

Greg King: You can check out Greg’s Fading Gigolo review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #77

Stars(3)

 

Nick Gardener: You can check out Nick’s Fading Gigolo review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #77

Stars(3)

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5): Stars(3)

IMDB Rating:  Fading Gigolo (2013) on IMDb

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘Fading Gigolo′: For our complete Fading Gigolo review please check The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #77.

Trailer:

Summary:Moonrise Kingdom is the new movie directed by two-time Academy Award-nominated filmmaker Wes Anderson. Set on an island off the coast of New England in the summer of 1965, Moonrise Kingdom tells the story of two 12-year olds who fall in love, make a secret pact, and run away together into the wilderness.

Year: 2012

Australian Cinema Release Date: 30th August, 2012

Australian DVD Release Date: 26th December, 2012

Country: United States

Director: Wes Anderson

Screenwriter: Wes Anderson, Roman Coppola

Cast: Bob Balaban (The Narrator), Marianna Bassham (Becky), Liz Callahan (Mrs. Billingsley), Rob H. Campbell (Deluca), Seamus Davey-Fitzpatrick (Roosevelt), Hugo DeAscentis (Edgar), James Demler (Noah), Tanner Flood (Murray Bishop), L.J. Foley (Izod), Chandler Frantz (Gadge), Jared Gilman (Sam), Kara Hayward (Suy), Lucas Hedges (Redford), Neal Huff (Jed), Harvey Keitel (Commander Pierce), Charlie Kilgore (Lazy Eye), Frances McDormand (Laura Bishop), Bill Murray (Walt Bishop), Tommy Nelson (Nickleby), Edward Norton (Scout Master Ward), Carolyn Pickman (Mrs. Lynn), Dakota Pimentel (Acolyte), Larry Pine (Mr. Billingsley), Jean-Michael Pion ((Ham), Wyatt Raliff (Rudy Bishop), Gabriel Rush (Skotak), Jake Ryan (Lionel Bishop), Jason Schwartzman (Cousin Ben), Andreas Sheikh (Panagle), Tilda Swinton (Social Services), Bruce Willis (Captain Sharp)

Runtime: 93 mins

Classification:PG

Dave Griffiths’s ‘Moonrise Kingdom’ Review:

If you aren’t a fan of director Wes Anderson’s (Fantastic Mr. Fox, The Darjeeling Limited) work then there really isn’t much of a point watching Moonrise Kingdom as it sees Mr. Anderson delve even further into his absurd brand of humor and it works remarkably well.

Set on a New England island in the 1960s Moonrise Kingdom focuses on orphan, Sam (Jared Gilman – newcomer) who organizes a brave escape from his scout troop, led by Scout Master Ward ( Edward Norton – The Bourne Legacy, Stone), so he can spend time with his to-be-girlfriend, Suzy (Kara Hayward – newcomer).

While Sam and Suzy believe they can create their own little piece of paradise they are soon being hunted down by the scouts who are after revenge, as well as local Police Officer Captain Sharp (Bruce Willis – Fire With Fire, The Expendables 2), Social Services (Tilda Swinton – We Need To Talk About Kevin, The Chronicles Of Narnia: The Voyage Of The Dawn Treader) and Suzy’s loopy parents Walt (Bill Murray – Passion Play, Fantastic Mr. Fox) and Laura Bishop (Frances McDormand – Madagascar 3: Europe’s Most Wanted, Transformers: Dark Of The Moon).

Anderson really doesn’t hold back with the comedy. Whether it be a fake looking lame explosion or some incredibly witty dialogue he knows how to get his audience to laugh and it works throughout the film. The fact that is script follows a young Romeo + Juliet style couple involved in their own tragic romance only makes the audience fall in love even more with film.

At time the deadpan nature of the acting does jar a little, but if you’re a fan of Wes Anderson’s work then it is something that you have come to get used to over the years. To his credit Anderson also takes some remarkably risks with Moonrise Kingdom, the fact that his two leads, Jared Gilman and Kara Hayward, are both newcomers and therefore unknown to cinema audiences was a big call that could have massively backfired, but as luck would have it both deliver amazing performances and instead announce themselves as stars of the future.

As usual Anderson does get the best out of his cast. Bruce Willis seems to relish the fact that he gets to play a role that does demand some real dramatic acting while Bill Murray and Frances McDormand lap up the opportunity to play up the comedy with some real out-there characters. But the real stars of the show here are Edward Norton who constantly has the audience in hysterics and Jason Schwartzman (TV’S Bored To Death & Sesame Street) who may only have limited screen time but certainly makes the best of it.

The humor of Moonrise Kingdom may not appeal to all, but if you think it may then this is a film that is guaranteed to make you laugh until you cry.

Other Subculture Media Reviews of Moonrise Kingdom: http://www.helium.com/items/2363846-movie-reviews-moonrise-kingdom-2012.

Rating: 3.5/5 Stars

IMDB Rating:Moonrise Kingdom (2012) on IMDb