Tagged: Brian F. Durkin

Summary: 
The saga of Michael Myers and Laurie Strode continues in the next thrilling chapter of the Halloween series.

Year: 2021

Cinema Release Dates:  28th October 2021 (Australia), 11th November 2021 (Thailand), 15th October 2021 (UK), 15th October 2021 (USA)

VOD Release Dates: TBA

Country: USA, UK

Director: David Gordon Green

Screenwriter: David Gordon Green, Danny McBride, Scott Teems

Cast: Airon Armstrong (The Shape – 1978), Dylan Arnold (Cameron Elam), Ross Bacon (Tivoli), Charlie Benton (Officer Richards), Haluk Bilginer (Dr. Ranbir Sartain), Nick Castle (The Shape), Lenny Clarke (Phil), Salem Collins (Christy), James Jude Courtney (The Shape), Jim Cummings (Pete McCabe), Jamie Lee Curtis (Laurie Strode), Charles Cyphers (Leigh Brackett), Omar J. Dorsey (Sherriff Baker), Brian F. Durkin (Deputy Graham), Judy Greer (Karen), Anthony Michael Hall (Tommy Doyle), Robert Lee Harvey (Tom F.F. Bentley), Tanya Jacobson (Tanya Jacobson), Tom Jones Jr. (Dr. Samuel Loomis), Jacob Keohane (Deputy Tobias), Nacy Kyes (Annie Brackett), Ryan Lewis (Deputy Sullivan), Robert Longstreet (Lonnie Elam), Scott MacArthur (Big John), Colin Mahan (Dr. Samuel Loomis (voice)), Thomas Mann (Young Hawkins), Andi Matichak (Allyson), Brian Mays (Brian The Bartender), Michael McDonald (Little John), Carmela McNeal (Vanessa), Tony Moran (Michael Myers), Jibrail Nantambu (Julian), Bob Odenkirk (Bob), Christian Michael Pates (Young Michael Myers), Will Patton (Officer Hawkins), Kyle Richards (Lindsay), Drew Schneid (Oscar), Michael Smallwood (Marcus), P.J. Soles (Lynda), Nancy Stephens (Marion), Diva Taylor (Sondra), J. Gaven Wilde (Dennis), Giselle Witt (Mindy)

Running Time: 105 mins

Classification: MA15+ (Australia), 18 (UK), R (USA)

OUR HALLOWEEN KILLS REVIEWS

David Griffiths’ Halloween Kills Review:

Why would anyone want to make a movie that fits into the universe of a timeless classic? I’ve thought about that a lot over the years, and even after hearing the excitement in producer Jason Blum’s voice when I interviewed him about the last Halloween film didn’t make it any clearer for me. Sure I get that excitement stemmed from the fact that Blum had always dreamt of making a Halloween but part of him must of wondered whether or not it would be worth the comments from the haters out there who were only too ready to troll once the film was released.

To Blum and director David Gordon Green’s (Stronger) credit the first film is this trilogy was probably the best Halloween film since Halloween H20 and it introduced the fan-base to a more modern and brutal take that was certainly not the re-make that so many haters out there were expecting.

Now comes the difficult second child in the trilogy and it is a bit of a double-edged sword. While Green ups and the violence and gore this time around to make it one of the most graphic and gruesome Halloween films it does suffer from what I call ‘second-film syndrome’ in that the ending of the film is so focussed on setting up things for the third film that it seems to forget that audiences deserve something decent to finish things this time around.

Halloween Kills starts where its predecessor ends. Laurie Strode (Jamie Lee Curtis – True Lies), her daughter Karen (Judy Greer – Ant-Man) and her grand-daughter Allyson (Andi Matichak – Orange Is The New Black) are being treated in hospital after luring Michael Myers into his fiery trap, however the trap failed and after Myers battles with the first responders he heads into town once again looking for his nemesis.

In town though everything has gone crazy. While Officer Hawkins (Will Patton – Armageddon) tries to not only hunt down Myers and restore calm to the town a group of vigilantes led by Tommy Doyle (Anthony Michael Hall – The Dark Knight) have decided that enough is enough and that the only way to end Myer’s murderous rampage is with some old-fashioned mob justice. The result is a catastrophic turn of events where nobody is safe.

There were so many things about Halloween Kills that I loved. Michael vs The First Responders is a classic Halloween moment that is going to be long remembered by fans of the series – it also may well be David Gordon Green’s legacy stamp on the franchise. I also loved the fact that instead of just introducing random characters that nobody has ever seen, or care about, into the battle with Michael that Green has gone back and chosen characters that have appeared in the franchise in the past to re-appear. That not only shows Green’s love of the material that his expanding on but also adds something a little special for true fans of the franchise.

That decision actually results in one of most memorable moments of the entire franchise as actor Anthony Michael Hall steals the show as Tommy Doyle. Hall’s performance mirrors what the town is going through – the anger, the determination and the hope that they can finally be rid of Michael once and for all. His performance here is something that Hall should be incredibly proud of.

I also loved the fact that the events of the film seem to mirror what has happened in recent American history. The vigilante group looking for justice and the mass panic at the hospital seemed to be ripped straight out of newspapers with what happened with the storming of the Capitol Building and some of the recent riots in the US. It is moments like that that make you realise that Green has been very capable with bringing this franchise into the modern day and you can’t help but wonder if he wasn’t making a sneaky comment about modern day American society with some of the scenes depicted throughout the film.

What I didn’t like though, aside from the limp ending, was that it felt like the film wasted the talents of Jamie Lee Curtis. While it would have been unbelievable to have her fit and spry after the events of the last film it did feel like she was wasted being bed-ridden for a majority of the film. At least if the believability of the film did need her in hospital then perhaps the film could have used the fact that she is a sitting, wounded duck waiting for the hunter better as a suspense mechanism.

Overall though Halloween Kills does work as a film though. There are some truly memorable scenes in the film that will be forever etched into horror folklore while the creative kills and extra gore make sure the film is above many of the sub-standard horror films out there on the market. Now all I can say is bring on the finale.

Dave’s rating Out Of 5

Average Subculture Rating:

Other Subculture Halloween Kills Reviews:

Nil

Trailer:

Summary: Gus Lobel (Clint Eastwood) has been one of the best scouts in baseball for decades, but, despite his efforts to hide it, age is starting to catch up with him. Nevertheless, Gus—who can tell a pitch just by the crack of the bat—refuses to be benched for what could be the final innings of his career.

He may not have a choice. The front office of the Atlanta Braves is starting to question his judgment, especially with the country’s hottest batting phenom on deck for the draft. The one person who might be able to help is also the one person Gus would never ask: his daughter, Mickey (Amy Adams), an associate at a high-powered Atlanta law firm whose drive and ambition has put her on the fast track to becoming partner. Mickey has never been close to her father, who was ill-equipped to be a single parent after the death of his wife. Even now, in the rare moments they share, he is too easily distracted by what Mickey assumes is his first love: the game.

Against her better judgment, and over Gus’s objections, Mickey joins him on his latest scouting trip to North Carolina, jeopardizing her own career to save his. Forced to spend time together for the first time in years, each makes new discoveries—revealing long-held truths about their past and present that could change their future.

Timberlake is Johnny Flanagan, a rival scout who has his sights on a career in the announcer’s booth…and has eyes for Mickey.

Year: 2012

Australian Cinema Release Date: 6th December, 2012

Australian DVD Release Date: N/A

Country: United States

Director: Robert Lorenz

Screenwriter: Randy Brown

Cast: Amy Adams (Mickey), Norma Alvarez (Grace Sanchez), Rus Blackwell ((Rick), Matt Bush (Danny), Karen Ceesay (Carol), Tom Dreeson (Rock), Brian F. Durkin (Matt Nelson), Clint Eastwood (Gus), Scott Eastwood (Billy Clark), Louis Fox (Lloyd), James Patrick Freetly (Todd), Jay Galloway (Ringo Sanchez), Jack Gilpin (Schwartz), John Goodman (Pete Klein), Bob Gunton (Watson), Clifton Guterman (Neil), Kevin Harrison (Young Gus), Peter Hermann (Greg), Ed Lauter (Max), Matthew Lillard (Phillip Sanderson), Joe Massingill (Bo Gentry), Seth Meriwether (Wilson), Ricky Muse (Jimmy), Robert Patrick (Vince), Chelcie Ross (Smitty), Bud Selig (himself), Tyler Silva (Carlos Sanchez), Raymond Anthony Thomas (Lucious), Justin Timberlake (Johnny), Julia Walters (Young Mickey), George Wyner (Rosenbloom)

Runtime: 111 mins

Classification: CTC

Dave Griffiths’s ‘Trouble With The Curve’ Review:

‘Trouble With The Curve’ desperately wants to be as good as ‘Moneyball’, yet at the same time wants to take a swipe at its main belief… that modern day baseball scouts can now be replaced by a computer. Sadly though the writer of ‘Trouble With The Curve’ hasn’t developed a script just as good, despite that though the film remains a good watch.

Gus Lobel (Clint Eastwood – Gran Torino, Million Dollar Baby) is one of the finest baseball scouts that America has ever had. His track record speaks for himself and he feels that he is safe in his job with the Atlanta Braves despite the fact that he is keeping a big secret – the fact that he is slowly losing his eyesight.

But when the likes of Phillip Sanderson (Matthew Lillard – Deep Dark Canyon, TV’S Criminal Minds) begin to put pressure on Gus’ immediate boss, Pete Klein (John Goodman – Flight, Argo) it seems that Gus’ days in his job may be numbered. Phillip keeps on saying that computers can now determine whether a player should be drafted or not and when Gus’ ideas on a rumoured number one picks seems to be different to everyone else’s it looks like Phillip may be right.

Despite the fact that Gus’ daughter, Mickey (Amy Adams – The Master, On The Road) feels that her father has neglected her over the years she travels to be with him when she learns about his failing eyesight. While the two scope the new recruit they are surprised to find help in the form of Johnny Flanagan (Justin Timberlake – In Time, Friends With Benefits), a player that Gus once scouted but was injured thanks to a mistake by team management.

The major weakness with ‘Trouble With The Curve’ is that screenwriter, Randy Brown has just made too many of the major storylines in the film too obvious to pick where they are going and then in similar fashion made the so called ‘evil’ characters such as Phillip so one dimensional that they just become the token bad guy… almost unbelievable.

But then on the other hand Brown gets a lot of things right. The secret that has caused tension between Gus and Mickey for so many years is brilliant (and certainly can’t be picked early on) while the fact that Brown has also written the scenes between Mickey and Johnny in such a way that the film has a romantic drama storyline rather than making it a stock standard romantic comedy also shows great skill.

Anyone expecting a huge acting effort from veteran Clint Eastwood shouldn’t get their hopes up, he simply plays the grumpy old man role that he has been doing so well over the past few years. Instead the winners here are Amy Adams and Justin Timberlake. Timberlake again shows why he deserves respect as an actor while Adams puts the past sin (known as ‘The Muppets’) behind her with a serviceable performance.

‘Trouble With The Curve’ is nowhere near as good as ‘Moneyball’ but is still a good watch and will be enjoyed my males and females alike even if they know nothing about baseball.

Other ‘Trouble With The Curve’ Reviews By Dave Griffiths: http://www.helium.com/items/2397762-trouble-with-the-curve-review

Rating: 3.5/5 Stars

IMDB Rating: Trouble with the Curve (2012) on IMDb