Tagged: Jamie Lee Curtis

This is Laurie Strode’s last stand.

After 45 years, the most acclaimed, revered horror franchise in film history reaches its epic, terrifying conclusion as Laurie Strode faces off for the last time against the embodiment of evil, Michael Myers, in a final confrontation unlike any captured on-screen before. Only one of them will survive.

Icon Jamie Lee Curtis returns for the last time as Laurie Strode, horror’s first “final girl” and the role that launched Curtis’ career. Curtis has portrayed Laurie for more than four decades now, one of the longest actor-character pairings in cinema history. When the franchise relaunched in 2018, Halloween shattered box office records, becoming the franchise’s highest-grossing chapter and set a new record for the biggest opening weekend for a horror film starring a woman.

Four years after the events of last year’s Halloween Kills, Laurie is living with her granddaughter Allyson (Andi Matichak) and is finishing writing her memoir. Michael Myers hasn’t been seen since. Laurie, after allowing the specter of Michael to determine and drive her reality for decades, has decided to liberate herself from fear and rage and embrace life. But when a young man, Corey Cunningham (Rohan Campbell; The Hardy BoysVirgin River), is accused of killing a boy he was babysitting, it ignites a cascade of violence and terror that will force Laurie to finally confront the evil she can’t control, once and for all.

Halloween Ends co-stars returning cast Will Patton as Officer Frank Hawkins, Kyle Richards as Lindsey Wallace and James Jude Courtney as The Shape.

From the creative team that relaunched the franchise with 2018’s Halloween and Halloween Kills, the film is directed by David Gordon Green from a screenplay by Paul Brad Logan (Manglehorn), Chris Bernier (The Driver series), Danny McBride and David Gordon Green, based on characters created by John Carpenter and Debra Hill. Halloween Ends is produced by Malek Akkad, Jason Blum and Bill Block. The executive producers are John Carpenter, Jamie Lee Curtis, Danny McBride, David Gordon Green, Ryan Freimann, Ryan Turek, Andrew Golov, Thom Zadra and Christopher H. Warner.

Universal Pictures, Miramax and Blumhouse present a Malek Akkad production, in association with Rough House Pictures.

Summary:  An aging Chinese immigrant is swept up in an insane adventure, where she alone can save the world by exploring other universes connecting with the lives she could have led.

Year: 2022

Cinema Release Dates:  14th May 2022 (Australia), 12th May 2022 (Thailand), 13th May 2022 (UK), 25th March 2022 (USA)

VOD Release Dates: TBA

Country: USA

Director: Dan Kwan, Daniel Scheinert

Screenwriter: Dan Kwan, Daniel Scheinert

Cast: Jamie Lee Curits (Deirdre Beaubeirdre), James Hong (Gong Gong), Stephanie Hsu (Joy Wang/Jobu Tupaki), Tallie Medel (Becky Sregor), Ke Huy Quan (Waymond Wong), Harry Shum Jnr. (Chad), Biff Whiff (Rick), Michelle Yeoh (Evelyn Wang)

Running Time: 139 mins

Classification: MA15+ (Australia), G (Thailand), 15 (UK), 13 (USA)

OUR EVERYTHING EVERYWHERE ALL AT ONCE REVIEWS

David Griffiths’ Everything Everywhere All At Once Review:

There seems to be an element creeping through Hollywood where some filmmakers seem to think that a film needs a ‘weird’ element to try and set it apart from other films that are currently in cinemas. We saw it earlier this year with the film C’mon, C’mon where the filmmakers thought that filming it in black and white would perhaps compensate for the fact that the characters are slightly unlikable. Now comes perhaps an even bigger crime against cinema – Everything Everywhere All At Once – a film that has an original storyline, some great action pieces but is ultimately ruined by some scenes that are just too weird for the average cinema goer.

Directed by Dan Kwan and Daniel Scheinert (Swiss Army Man) the film centres around a family made up of strong but judgemental mother Evelyn (Michelle Yeoh – Tomorrow Never Dies), emotionally lost husband Waymond (Ke Huy Quan – The Goonies) and daughter Joy Wang (Stephanie Hsu – The Path) who feels that she is constantly judged by her mother.

The family at hand is a family in turmoil, not only is Joy becoming estranged from her mother and father, Waymond  is looking for a way out and the family Laundromat is coming under intense scrutiny from the taxation office.

With all of that happening  Evelyn soon finds out from a Waymond from a different dimension that there is an inter-dimensional war going on and that she is a very big part of it. As she becomes more involved in this inter-dimensional rift though she finds herself becoming a ‘wanted’ woman by the authorities in her own dimension.

What we have with Everything Everywhere All At Once is a film that shows that even the most creative storyline can be totally destroyed by some simple stupid mistakes. The original premise of this film is great – a family internally tearing themselves apart with a sci-fi fantasy element that is as creative as anything we ever saw with The Matrix but sadly once this film begins to delve into areas of people having to insert items into their butts and a dimension of people with weird sausage hands the film jumps the shark in a way that almost makes it unwatchable.

How such creative filmmakers can fall into such a juvenile trap is almost incomprehensible. Early on the film contains such heart as it explores deep topics such a daughter feeling that she has been rejected by her parents through to a husband that is convinced that his marriage is over. The fact that Kwan and Scheinert can mix topics as deep as those with great looking fight sequences shows pure class – that is why it is so disappointing that the film ultimately becomes a farce beyond stupidity.

The shining lights in this film are the actors. Michelle Yeoh leads from the front with a brilliant performance that one again sees her mix heartfelt scenes with her family with well-choreographed but natural looking fight scenes. She is well supported by Ke Quy Huan who is called upon to play a range of different Waymonds and does an exceptional job with each. Last but not least is Stephanie Hsu who announces herself as a star of the future in a role that sees her deliver some of the more heart-wrenching moments of the film.

Everything Everywhere All At Once should serve as a warning to all filmmakers out there. You can the best idea that anyone has ever had for a film but you can let yourself down by going just that little bit obscure. Once again A24 show as a company that their films are either spectacularly brilliant or ruin themselves with unwatchable weirdness.

Dave’s rating Out Of 5

Average Subculture Rating:

Other Subculture Everything Everywhere All A Once Reviews:

You can read our review of Everything Everywhere All At Once that appeared in The Phuket News right here – https://www.thephuketnews.com/everything-everywhere-all-at-once-%E2%80%92-or-not-84162.php

Trailer:

The film is described as a hilarious and big-hearted sci-fi action adventure about an exhausted Chinese American woman (Yeoh) who can’t seem to finish her taxes.
 
EVERYTHING EVERYWHERE ALL AT ONCE is directed by Daniel Kwan and Daniel Scheinert and stars Michael Yeoh, Stephanie Hsu, Ke Huy Quan, James Hong, Jenny Slate, Harry Shum Jr.
and Jamie Lee Curtis.
 
EVERYTHING EVERYWHERE ALL AT ONCE coming to Australian cinemas in 2022.

Minutes after Laurie Strode (Curtis) her daughter Karen (Judy Greer) and granddaughter Allyson (Andi Matichak) left masked monster Michael Myers caged and burning in Laurie’s basement, Laurie is rushed to the hospital with life threatening injuries, believing she finally killed her lifelong tormentor.

But when Michael manages to free himself from Laurie’s trap, his ritual bloodbath resumes. As Laurie fights her pain and prepares to defend herself against him, she inspires all of Haddonfield to rise up against their unstoppable monster.

The Strode women join a group of other survivors of Michael’s first rampage who decide to take matters into their own hands, forming a vigilante mob that sets out to hunt Michael down, once and for all.

Evil dies tonight.

In 2018, David Gordon Green’s Halloween, starring icon Jamie Lee Curtis,killed at the box office, earning more than $250 million worldwide, becoming the highest-grossing chapter in the four-decade franchise and setting a new record for the biggest opening weekend in history for a horror film starring a woman.

And the Halloween night when Michael Myers returned isn’t over yet. 

Minutes after Laurie Strode (Curtis), her daughter Karen (Judy Greer) and granddaughter Allyson (Andi Matichak) left masked monster Michael Myers caged and burning in Laurie’s basement, Laurie is rushed to the hospital with life-threatening injuries, believing she finally killed her lifelong tormentor.

But when Michael manages to free himself from Laurie’s trap, his ritual bloodbath resumes. As Laurie fights her pain and prepares to defend herself against him, she inspires all of Haddonfield to rise up against their unstoppable monster.

The Strode women join a group of other survivors of Michael’s first rampage who decide to take matters into their own hands, forming a vigilante mob that sets out to hunt Michael down, once and for all.

Evil dies tonight.

Universal Pictures, Miramax, Blumhouse Productions and Trancas International Films present Halloween Kills, co-starring Will Patton as Officer Frank Hawkins, Thomas Mann (Kong: Skull Island) and Anthony Michael Hall (The Dark Knight).

From the returning filmmaking team responsible for the 2018 global phenomenon, Halloween Kills is written by Scott Teems (SundanceTV’s Rectify) and Danny McBride and David Gordon Green based on characters created by John Carpenter and Debra Hill. The film is directed by David Gordon Green and produced by Malek Akkad, Jason Blum and Bill Block. The executive producers are John Carpenter, Jamie Lee Curtis, Danny McBride, David Gordon Green and Ryan Freimann.