Tagged: Kevin McKidd

Disney+ announced today that Season 18 of the award-winning medical drama series, “Grey’s Anatomy”, will premiere exclusively on Disney+ under the Star banner, on October 20 in Australia.
 
Recipient of the 2007 Golden Globe® Award for Best Drama Television Series and nominated for multiple Emmys®, including Outstanding Drama Series, “Grey’s Anatomy” is considered one of the great television shows of our time. The high-intensity medical drama, now in its 18th season, follows Meredith Grey and the team of doctors at Grey Sloan Memorial who are faced with life-or-death decisions daily. They seek comfort from one another, and, at times, more than just friendship. Together they discover that neither medicine nor relationships can be defined in black and white.
 
“Grey’s Anatomy” stars Ellen Pompeo as Meredith Grey, Chandra Wilson as Miranda Bailey, James Pickens Jr. as Richard Webber, Kevin McKidd as Owen Hunt, Kim Raver as Teddy Altman, Camilla Luddington as Jo Wilson, Caterina Scorsone as Amelia Shepherd, Kelly McCreary as Maggie Pierce, Chris Carmack as Atticus “Link” Lincoln, Jake Borelli as Levi Schmitt, Richard Flood as Cormac Hayes and Anthony Hill as Winston Ndugu.
 
The series was created and is executive produced by Shonda Rhimes (“Scandal,” “How to Get Away with Murder,” “Station 19”). Betsy Beers (“Scandal,” “How to Get Away with Murder,” “Station 19”), Mark Gordon (“Saving Private Ryan”), Krista Vernoff (“Shameless”), Debbie Allen, Zoanne Clack and Meg Marinis are executive producers. “Grey’s Anatomy” is produced by ABC Signature, one of the Disney Television Studios.

Summary: After 20 years abroad, Mark Renton returns to Scotland and reunites with his old friends Sick Boy, Spud, and Begbie.

Year: 2017

Australian Cinema Release Date: 31st March 2017

Australian DVD Release Date: 14th June 2017

Country: United Kingdom

Director: Danny Boyle

Screenwriter: John Hodge, Irvine Welsh (novels)

Cast: John Bell (Spud aged 20), George Best (himself), Ewen Bremner (Spud), Robert Carlyle (Begbie/Begbie’s Father), Christopher Douglas (Chris The Oracle), Kyle Fitzpatrick (Fergus), Logan Gillies (Simon aged 9), Scott Greenan (Frank Jnr.), Aidan Haggarty (Spud aged 9), Hamish Haggerty (Young Renton), Charlie Hardie (Fergus aged 9), Shirley Henderson (Gail), Daniel Jackson (Young Begbie), John Kazek (Tom), Gordon Kennedy (Tulloch),  Elik Kish (Dozo), Devon Lamb (Baby Dawn), Lauren Lamb (Baby Dawn), Pauline Lynch (Lizzy), Thierry Mabonga (Security Officer Wilson), Kelly Macdonald (Diane),  James McElvar (Simon aged 20), Connor McIndoe (Renton aged 20), Ewan McGregor (Renton), Kevin McKidd (Tommy), Jonny Lee Miller (Simon), Christopher Mullen (Begbie aged 20), Anjela Nedyalkova (Veronika), Steven Robertson (Stoddart), Michael Shaw (Tommy aged 20), Ben Skelton (Renton aged 9), Daniel Smith (Begbie aged 9), Pauline Turner (June), Tom Urie (Big Bear), Bradley Welsh (Doyle), Irvine Welsh (Mikey Forrester), Elijah Wolf (Tommy aged 9)

Running Time: 117 mins

Classification: R

 

OUR T2 TRAINSPOTTING REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

Kyle McGrath’s T2 Trainspotting Review:

Over the last 10 years we’ve seen many “long time later” sequels. They’re often comedies which fall flat like Anchorman 2, Zoolander 2 or Bad Santa 2. Only earlier this week we had “XxX: The Return of Xander Cage” 12 years after the previous film in the franchise. These movies usually fail relying too much on decade old references or nostalgia alone. Rarely do we see long time later sequels to films which aren’t action or comedy which is a pity because I think it’s in these other stories where the passage of time could be much more relevant.

“T2: Trainspotting” is the 20 year later follow up to the 1996 cult hit Trainspotting. When we left Renton (Ewan McGregor) he had betrayed his so called friends Sick Boy (Johnny Lee Miller), Spud (Ewen Bremner) & the psychotic Begbie (Robert Carlyle). He had stollen the £16,000 they had just made from a drug deal he was forced into and aimed to finally remove himself from the environment which led to his heroin addiction and would consume him otherwise. Years later pushing 50 and with nowhere else to call home he has returned to make amends with his less psychotic friends and try to find some semblance of a life to live. Coincidentally Begbie has just escaped from prison and is looking to do the same, it’s only a matter of time before his 20 year grudge against Renton catches up to him.
It was several years after its release that I was finally able to watch the original Trainspotting, I do remember some of the controversy surrounding it however. It was inevitably seen by some as glamorising heroin addiction which was of course ridiculous while at the same time it wasn’t on the level of some anti-drug PSA. To me the film was more about the toxic environment which Renton inhabited than the addiction itself. The film’s most pitiful characters were those who were total slaves to their addiction while the most repulsive character in the entire story was undoubtedly Begbie who would never touch the stuff.
This new film again rather than focusing really at all on drug addiction deals more with themes of midlife crisis and a feeling of lack of achievement. The original movie (and I’ll be referring back to the original film a lot this sequel being so tied to it as it is) ended with Renton “choosing life” and possibly being able to lead a fulfilling life finally escaping the culture which was holding him down. T2 is more about the idea of what if he didn’t go on to great things? If he was middle aged and had nothing to show for it with 30-40 more years to live, what would he do with them. To say nothing of junkie Spud, pimp & blackmailing Sick Boy and the infamous Begbie dealing with similar mid life crises of their own.
It’s an interesting direction to take the story and coming back to see these characters who we remember from 2 decades ago in a completely different light really makes the movie. The movie is in a unique position to evoke legitimate feelings of nostalgia from the audience familiar with its predecessor. Something which similarly made Toy Story 3 so beloved, VERY different of a movie as that may be.
The film’s biggest problem however also stems from the time which has passed and the success of the original movie. Trainspotting really is a classic. It’s soundtrack was amazing and there was something just so real and organic about it. The actor’s chemistry with each other and Danny Boyle’s vision and style made it the cult classic it is today and was instrumental in skyrocketing almost everyone involved to stardom.
This film by comparison feels very Hollywood. It no longer has that same fresh feeling and generally seems far to much like a studio product. The comedy for example in the original was much more situational and natural, here it’s almost always: set up, punchline, pause for laughter. A bar fight between Sick Boy & Renton upon their reunion takes time out to pause and focus on an old man they’re fighting around who’s completely nonplused by the whole event. It’s a very “isn’t this funny?” moment.
Another would be Renton’s “choose life” monologue. In the original film it’s the opening and closing voice over from an omnipotent narrator. In this film it’s brought up awkwardly and somebody asks him to explain it over dinner. He then gives the same type of speech only in dialogue this time and not at one point does it feel like anything natural, made worse by the fact it’s obviously been redubbed by McGregor later on for whatever reason. These are just examples but it’s representative of how forced and scripted the whole thing felt at times.
I think like Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull the problem is even if you largely have the same crew working on your film. (Same actors, same writer, same director) the issue is that those people may be very different filmmakers than they were 20 years ago. Danny Boyle is a veteran filmmaker and Oscar winner now so the film doesn’t have that independent, rough feel of 2 decades ago.
The actors are another issue. While it seems pedantic it was hard to see them in the same believable light that I did in the first movie due to their immense success. They were unknowns in 1996, now Renton is Obi Wan Kenobi, Sick Boy stars on American television as Sherlock Holmes in Elementary and Begbie was a Bond villain. While the actors still have great chemistry it was hard to see it as believable that they’d had 20 years of doing nothing when in reality they’ve almost all had 20 years of incredible successful careers as actors perhaps with the exception of Ewen Bremner which is probably why he was most believable in the role.
Again I know “it’s called acting” but there’s a reason Mickey Rourke worked so well in The Wrestler, Eminem was amazing in 8 Mile or Michael Keaton was perfect casting for Birdman. Cast Tom Hanks in the role of an out of work actor and see how believable it is.
T2 Trainspotting is definitely better than almost every other long term sequel of recent memory and we’re not likely to see many other films like this. Sadly though it’s far from living up to being as iconic as the original film in any way and feels more like something which could have been a short movie rather than a feature film.  Still I think it’s a movie for fans alone as it doesn’t really have much going for it otherwise to make it stand up on its own.

 

 

Average Subculture Rating:  

 

 

IMDB Rating:  T2 Trainspotting (2017) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment T2 Trainspotting Reviews: N/A

 

Trailer:

Summary:

Pixar Animation Studios, the creator of Toy Story 3, whisks you away on an astonishing adventure to an ancient land full of mystery and tradition. Bursting with heart, unforgettable characters and Pixars signature humor, Brave is a rousing, gorgeously animated good time, raves Peter Travers of Rolling Stone.Take a heroic journey with Merida, a skilled archer and headstrong daughter of King Fergus and Queen Elinor. Determined to carve her own path in life, Merida defi es an age-old custom sacred to the unruly and uproarious lords of the land. When Meridas actions inadvertently unleash chaos in the kingdom, she must harness all of her skills and resources including her clever and mischievous triplet brothers to undo a beastly curse before its too late, and discover the meaning of true bravery.

Year: 2012

Australian Cinema Release Date: 21st June, 2012

Australian DVD Release Date: 21th November, 2012

Country: United States

Director: Mark Andrews, Brenda Chapman, Steve Purcell

Screenwriter: Mark Andrews, Brenda Chapman, Irene Mecchi, Steve Purcell

Cast: Peigi Barker (Young Merida (voice)), Robbie Coltrane (Lord Dingwall (voice)), Billy Connolly (Fergus (voice)), Steven Cree (Young Macintosh (voice)), Craig Ferguson (Lord Macintosh (voice)), Eilidh Fraser (Maudie (voice)), Sally Kinghorn (Maudie (voice)), Kelly Macdonald (Merida (voice)), Kevin McKidd (Lord MacGuffin/Young MacGuffin (voice)), Callum O’Neil (Wee Dingwell (voice)), Steve Purcell (The Crow (voice)), John Ratzenberger (Gordon (voice)), Emma Thompson (Elinor (voice)), Julie Walters (The Witch (voice))

Runtime: 100 mins

Classification:PG

Dave Griffiths’s ‘Brave’ Review:

Okay sit down and strap yourself in because I’m about to say something that may be a shock to some people. Brave is one of the best animated films of all time. It doesn’t take rocket science to come to that conclusion because this is one film that simply doesn’t do anything wrong.

Disney Pixar answers their critics who recently slammed the company for never creating strong female characters by revealing Merida (voiced by Kelly Macdonald – Harry Potter & The Deathly Hallows Part 2, TV’S Boardwalk Empire), one of the strongest female characters to grace our screens in a long, long time.

While Merida’s mother, Queen Elinor (Emma Thompson – Men In Black 3, Harry Potter & The Deathly Hallows Part 2) wants Merida to be a good Princess and marry one of the Kingdom’s eligible batchelors her father, King Fergus (Billy Connolly – The Ballad Of Nessie, Gullivar’s Travels) encourages to follow her dreams and become a warrior.

Angry that it seems her mother will get her way Merida meets a witch (Julie Walters – Harry Potter & The Deathly Hallows Part 2, Gnomeo & Juliet) and asks her to do a spell that will change everything… the only problem is that happens in a way that becomes life-threatening.

One of the standouts with Brave is the fabulous work put in by the film’s directors, Mark Andrews (Violet, One Man Band) and Brenda Chapman (The Prince Of Egypt). Aided by spectacular feats of animation these talented directors bring a look and feel to this film that most animated films would be envious of. The detail in the shots taken in the forest are amazing, you can even see the lines on each of the leaves.

Another brave decision by the filmmakers that really pays off is the fact that they went with Scottish actress Kelly Macdonald (who most people would remember from Trainspotting) to voice Merida. Most producers would have lined up Hollywood’s latest starlet and just asked her to put on a Scottish accent, but in the case of Brave you feel that would have been something that really wouldn’t have worked.

With a brilliant script and some of the best animation work that you are ever likely to see Brave is one film that will be enjoyed by both kids and adults alike.

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘Brave’: http://www.helium.com/items/2336831-movie-reviews-brave-2012.

Rating: 5/5 Stars

IMDB Rating: Brave (2012) on IMDb