Tagged: John Bell

Summary: After 20 years abroad, Mark Renton returns to Scotland and reunites with his old friends Sick Boy, Spud, and Begbie.

Year: 2017

Australian Cinema Release Date: 31st March 2017

Australian DVD Release Date: 14th June 2017

Country: United Kingdom

Director: Danny Boyle

Screenwriter: John Hodge, Irvine Welsh (novels)

Cast: John Bell (Spud aged 20), George Best (himself), Ewen Bremner (Spud), Robert Carlyle (Begbie/Begbie’s Father), Christopher Douglas (Chris The Oracle), Kyle Fitzpatrick (Fergus), Logan Gillies (Simon aged 9), Scott Greenan (Frank Jnr.), Aidan Haggarty (Spud aged 9), Hamish Haggerty (Young Renton), Charlie Hardie (Fergus aged 9), Shirley Henderson (Gail), Daniel Jackson (Young Begbie), John Kazek (Tom), Gordon Kennedy (Tulloch),  Elik Kish (Dozo), Devon Lamb (Baby Dawn), Lauren Lamb (Baby Dawn), Pauline Lynch (Lizzy), Thierry Mabonga (Security Officer Wilson), Kelly Macdonald (Diane),  James McElvar (Simon aged 20), Connor McIndoe (Renton aged 20), Ewan McGregor (Renton), Kevin McKidd (Tommy), Jonny Lee Miller (Simon), Christopher Mullen (Begbie aged 20), Anjela Nedyalkova (Veronika), Steven Robertson (Stoddart), Michael Shaw (Tommy aged 20), Ben Skelton (Renton aged 9), Daniel Smith (Begbie aged 9), Pauline Turner (June), Tom Urie (Big Bear), Bradley Welsh (Doyle), Irvine Welsh (Mikey Forrester), Elijah Wolf (Tommy aged 9)

Running Time: 117 mins

Classification: R

 

OUR T2 TRAINSPOTTING REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

Kyle McGrath’s T2 Trainspotting Review:

Over the last 10 years we’ve seen many “long time later” sequels. They’re often comedies which fall flat like Anchorman 2, Zoolander 2 or Bad Santa 2. Only earlier this week we had “XxX: The Return of Xander Cage” 12 years after the previous film in the franchise. These movies usually fail relying too much on decade old references or nostalgia alone. Rarely do we see long time later sequels to films which aren’t action or comedy which is a pity because I think it’s in these other stories where the passage of time could be much more relevant.

“T2: Trainspotting” is the 20 year later follow up to the 1996 cult hit Trainspotting. When we left Renton (Ewan McGregor) he had betrayed his so called friends Sick Boy (Johnny Lee Miller), Spud (Ewen Bremner) & the psychotic Begbie (Robert Carlyle). He had stollen the £16,000 they had just made from a drug deal he was forced into and aimed to finally remove himself from the environment which led to his heroin addiction and would consume him otherwise. Years later pushing 50 and with nowhere else to call home he has returned to make amends with his less psychotic friends and try to find some semblance of a life to live. Coincidentally Begbie has just escaped from prison and is looking to do the same, it’s only a matter of time before his 20 year grudge against Renton catches up to him.
It was several years after its release that I was finally able to watch the original Trainspotting, I do remember some of the controversy surrounding it however. It was inevitably seen by some as glamorising heroin addiction which was of course ridiculous while at the same time it wasn’t on the level of some anti-drug PSA. To me the film was more about the toxic environment which Renton inhabited than the addiction itself. The film’s most pitiful characters were those who were total slaves to their addiction while the most repulsive character in the entire story was undoubtedly Begbie who would never touch the stuff.
This new film again rather than focusing really at all on drug addiction deals more with themes of midlife crisis and a feeling of lack of achievement. The original movie (and I’ll be referring back to the original film a lot this sequel being so tied to it as it is) ended with Renton “choosing life” and possibly being able to lead a fulfilling life finally escaping the culture which was holding him down. T2 is more about the idea of what if he didn’t go on to great things? If he was middle aged and had nothing to show for it with 30-40 more years to live, what would he do with them. To say nothing of junkie Spud, pimp & blackmailing Sick Boy and the infamous Begbie dealing with similar mid life crises of their own.
It’s an interesting direction to take the story and coming back to see these characters who we remember from 2 decades ago in a completely different light really makes the movie. The movie is in a unique position to evoke legitimate feelings of nostalgia from the audience familiar with its predecessor. Something which similarly made Toy Story 3 so beloved, VERY different of a movie as that may be.
The film’s biggest problem however also stems from the time which has passed and the success of the original movie. Trainspotting really is a classic. It’s soundtrack was amazing and there was something just so real and organic about it. The actor’s chemistry with each other and Danny Boyle’s vision and style made it the cult classic it is today and was instrumental in skyrocketing almost everyone involved to stardom.
This film by comparison feels very Hollywood. It no longer has that same fresh feeling and generally seems far to much like a studio product. The comedy for example in the original was much more situational and natural, here it’s almost always: set up, punchline, pause for laughter. A bar fight between Sick Boy & Renton upon their reunion takes time out to pause and focus on an old man they’re fighting around who’s completely nonplused by the whole event. It’s a very “isn’t this funny?” moment.
Another would be Renton’s “choose life” monologue. In the original film it’s the opening and closing voice over from an omnipotent narrator. In this film it’s brought up awkwardly and somebody asks him to explain it over dinner. He then gives the same type of speech only in dialogue this time and not at one point does it feel like anything natural, made worse by the fact it’s obviously been redubbed by McGregor later on for whatever reason. These are just examples but it’s representative of how forced and scripted the whole thing felt at times.
I think like Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull the problem is even if you largely have the same crew working on your film. (Same actors, same writer, same director) the issue is that those people may be very different filmmakers than they were 20 years ago. Danny Boyle is a veteran filmmaker and Oscar winner now so the film doesn’t have that independent, rough feel of 2 decades ago.
The actors are another issue. While it seems pedantic it was hard to see them in the same believable light that I did in the first movie due to their immense success. They were unknowns in 1996, now Renton is Obi Wan Kenobi, Sick Boy stars on American television as Sherlock Holmes in Elementary and Begbie was a Bond villain. While the actors still have great chemistry it was hard to see it as believable that they’d had 20 years of doing nothing when in reality they’ve almost all had 20 years of incredible successful careers as actors perhaps with the exception of Ewen Bremner which is probably why he was most believable in the role.
Again I know “it’s called acting” but there’s a reason Mickey Rourke worked so well in The Wrestler, Eminem was amazing in 8 Mile or Michael Keaton was perfect casting for Birdman. Cast Tom Hanks in the role of an out of work actor and see how believable it is.
T2 Trainspotting is definitely better than almost every other long term sequel of recent memory and we’re not likely to see many other films like this. Sadly though it’s far from living up to being as iconic as the original film in any way and feels more like something which could have been a short movie rather than a feature film.  Still I think it’s a movie for fans alone as it doesn’t really have much going for it otherwise to make it stand up on its own.

 

 

Average Subculture Rating:  

 

 

IMDB Rating:  T2 Trainspotting (2017) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment T2 Trainspotting Reviews: N/A

 

Trailer:

The Hobbit Battle Of Five Armies

Summary: Peter Jackson’s last foray into the world of Middle Earth begins with Lake-town under severe attack after Smaug (voiced by Benedict Cumberbatch) has left the Mountain and is looking for revenge. Bilbo (Martin Freeman) and co can do very little but watch as the attack occurs.

Meanwhile while others group together to rescue Gandalf (Ian McKellan), Bilbo is left stunned as the Mountain has a strange affect on Thorin (Richard Armitage) who seems to be going crazy as he insanely looks for the Heart Of The Mountain. His group grow increasingly worried as various armies march on the mountain to claim it and Thorin continues his search without honouring his debts or even bothering to help those who are trying to defend the Mountain.

Year: 2014

Australian Cinema Release Date: 26th December, 2014

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA, New Zealand

Director: Peter Jackson

Screenwriter: Philippa Boyens, Guillermo del Toro, Peter Jackson, Fran Walsh, J.R.R. Tolkien (novel)

Cast: Richard Armitage (Thorin), Erin Banks (Lobeila Sackville Baggins), Timothy Bartlett (Master Worrywort), John Bell (Bain), Manu Bennett (Azog), Nick Blake (Percy), Cate Blanchett (Galadriel), Orlando Bloom (Legolas), Jed Brophy (Nori), Adam Brown (Ori), John Callen (Oin), Billy Connolly (Dain), Benedict Cumberbatch (Smaug/Necromancer (voice)), Luke Evans (Bard), Martin Freeman (Bilbo Baggins), Stephen Fry (Master Of Laketown), Ryan Gage (Alfrid), Mark Hadlow (Dori), Peter Hambleton (Gloin), Miranda Harcourt (Olga), Ian Holm (Old Bilbo), Brian Hotter (Otho Sackville Baggins), Stephen Hunter (Bombur), Kelly Kilgour (Soury), William Kircher (Bifur), Martin Kwok (Ragash (voice)), Christopher Lee (Saruman), Evangeline Lilly (Tauriel), Simon London (Feren), Sylvester McCoy (Radagast), Ian McKellan (Gandalf), Thomasin McKenzie (Astrid), Graham McTavish (Dwalin), Mark Mitchinson (Braga), James Nesbitt (Bofur), Mary Nesbitt (Tilda), Peggy Nesbitt (Sigrid), Dean O’Gorman (Fili), Lee Pace (Thrandiul), Sarah Peirse (Hilda Bianca), Mikael Persbrandt (Beorn), Allan Smith (Ragash), Merv Smith (Tosser Grub), Conan Stevens (Keep Of The Dungeons), Ken Stott (Balin), John Tui (Bolg), Aidan Turner (Kili), Hugo Weaving (Elrond)

Runtime: 145 mins

Classification: M

 

OUR THE HOBBIT: THE BATTLE OF FIVE ARMIES REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

Adam RossYou can check out Adam’s The Hobbit: The Battle Of Five Armies review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #111.

Stars(3)

 

Greg KingYou can check out Greg’s The Hobbit: The Battle Of Five Armies review on www.filmreviews.net.au

Stars(2.5)

 

Nick GardenerYou can check out Nick’s The Hobbit: The Battle Of Five Armies review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #111.

Stars(3)

 

David Griffiths:

Peter Jackson’s Middle Earth six-peat is understandably a life-long ambition that he wanted to achieve. Outside of George Lucas and Star Wars it is arguable that no director in the history of cinema has ever shown so much dedication to a series of films. And let’s be honest while The Lord Of The Rings trilogy were a real feat in filmmaking The Hobbit series has rarely reached the same amazing peaks. The first film while serviceable at times seemed more like a documentary on a walking tours of New Zealand than it did as a huge mythical epic, while it was also plagued by the new technology Jackson brought to the film which had some cinema goers feeling like they were watching the film in fast forward.

What gave us hope that Jackson would be back to his best with The Hobbit: The Battle Of Five Armies was its predecessor, The Hobbit: The Desolation Of Smaug. Smaug was what everybody was expecting from this series, Jackson back to being able mix good characterisation with some very creative action, but sadly it seems that film is going to be the high mark of the series because Five Armies seems to be completely hit or miss.

The Hobbit: The Battle Of Five Armies is going to be a film that will be enjoyed if you like epic battles, but if you’re a serious movie buff there will still be things that seriously irk you about the film. The battle itself is lengthy but to be honest the directors of Game Of Thrones seem to have spoilt us so much over the past couple of seasons that even some of the action here seems to be a little disappointing on the big screen.

There are several moments during which the audience will be left completely scratching their heads. For example the scene in which Galadriel (Cate Blanchett), Saruman (Christopher Lee) and Elrond (Hugo Weaving) sweep in to save Gandalf not only contains some shockingly bad special effects that look like they may have been lifted from a 1980s straight-to-video nasty but also leaves you wondering that with the power of Elrond on show for all to see why he doesn’t then and go and help out with the battle?

Then to be honest there are some incredibly amazing moments in the film as well. Some of Legolas (Orlando Bloom) and Thorin’s fight scenes with Orcs on the ice-cap mountain do look extremely good, despite the fact that at times such as Legolas’ rock-jumping sequence the audience is left having to suspend their believability of what it is happening. Then Jackson also creates some very touching moments between characters that tug on the audience’s heart strings in a way that an epic action film like this shouldn’t be able to. The up-and-down nature of The Hobbit series seems to battle itself to no end in this finale of the franchise.

With such a huge ensemble cast gathering together for this final film, it’s understandable that some actors don’t get the screen they deserve. As previously mentioned actors like Hugo Weaving and Cate Blanchett have their skills completely underused while Billy Connolly seems to only turn up for the comedic effect of playing Dain. The big winners out of The Hobbit: The Battle Of Five Armies are Orlando Bloom, who on the back of his performance in Smaug should have done enough to remind Hollywood producers that he is always a pretty decent actor in big blockbusters, Martin Freeman and Richard Armitage. Freeman has become a really easy actor to warm to throughout the series while Armitage who was mainly a television actor before this series of films has really revealed himself to be a seriously good character actor who should have a huge career ahead of him.

It is sad that Jackson’s Middle Earth saga has come to a close, it is even sadder that it has had to happen with such a mediocre film, especially when you take into consideration the lofty heights set by The Lord Of The Rings trilogy. That may well be something that comes to haunt Jackson’s career from here on in as it is just too easy to compare anything he makes now back to a series that really changed the cinema landscape. The best hope that The Battle Of Five Armies has is that it is like Unexpected Journey and begins to grow on you the more times that you watch it.

Stars(3)

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5):  Stars(3)

 

IMDB Rating: The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies (2014) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment The Hobbit: The Battle Of Five Army reviews: For our full The Hobbit: The Battle Of Five Armies review make sure you check out The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #111. You can also read our review on The Book The Film The T-Shirt.

Trailer:

Wrath Of The Titans

Summary: Perseus braves the treacherous underworld to rescue his father, Zeus, captured by his son, Ares, and brother Hades who unleash the ancient Titans upon the world.

Year: 2012

Australian Cinema Release Date: 29th March, 2012

Australian DVD Release Date: 21st August, 2012

Country: USA, Spain

Director: Jonathan Liebesman

Screenwriter: Dan Mazeau, David Johnson, Greg Berlanti (story), Beverley Cross (1981 screenplay)

Cast: John Bell (Helius), Kathryn Carpenter (Athena), Sinead Cusack (Clea), Freddy Drabble (Apollo), Ralph Fiennes (Hades), Lamberto Guerra (Timon), Jorge Guimera (Theodulus), Danny Huston (Poseidon), Lily James (Korrina), Toby Kebbell (Agenor), Asier Macazaga (Theron), Alejandro Naranjo (Mantius), Liam Neeson (Zeus), Bill Nighy (Hephaestus), Rosamund Pike (Andromeda), Edgar Ramirez (Ares), Daniel Galindo Rojas (Eustachius), Sam Worthington (Perseus)

Runtime: 99 mins

Classification:M

 OUR WRATH OF THE TITANS REVIEWS & RATINGS

Adam Ross: Stars(2)

Please check Adam’s Wrath of The Titans review of that is available on The Crat

Greg King: Stars(1.5)

Please check Greg’s Wrath of The Titans review of that is available on www.filmreviews.net.au

David Griffiths:

Dave’s review from Entertainment Scene 360

Wrath Of The Titans is very much a ‘guilty pleasure’ film. There isn’t much substance in the actual storyline and the acting standard is far from what you would describe as great, yet alone likely to ever warrant the attention of awards or nominations, yet there is something strangely alluring and enjoyable about a film that is set to become an action favourite.

If you haven’t seen Clash Of The Titans it is highly recommended you give it a watch before you sit down to watch Wrath Of The Titans as the screenwriters haven’t given great detail in setting up characterisation. In fact if you can’t remember what happened, or the status of the relationship, between Perseus (Sam Worthington) and Zeus (Liam Neeson) then you certainly need to do a Clash Of The Titans refresher because while it is mentioned a couple of times this time around (and is an important part of the story) it is never fully explained.

This time around sees Perseus trying to forget about his heritage and events of the past by living as a humble fisherman in a small village while protecting his son. It’s not only Persues’ life that has completely changed, the whole world has. No longer do regular citizens turn to the Gods in prayer or sacrifice and as a result all the Gods, even the mighty Zeus, have weakened in power.

The world is turned even darker when Zeus’s sons Ares (Edgar Ramirez) and Hades (Ralph Fiennes) join forces in a bid to release a sinister force. It is then up to Perseus to reluctantly team up with Agenor (Toby Kebbell) and Andromeda (Rosamund Pike) and try to stop the force from destroying the Earth.

Much of the fact that the film stands up is thanks to director, Jonathan Liebesman. Liebesman proved with World Invasion: Battle L.A. that he can turn an ordinary action script to a good looking flashy film on the big screen, and with Wrath Of The Titans he certainly does that. He manages to let the audience forget that there is a weak (at best) storyline and very little characterization by blowing their socks off with some amazing action sequences that for once actually allows you to keep track of who-is-who during ‘busy’ action sequences.

People planning on seeing Wrath Of The Titans in Imax 3D should be warned that some of the action scenes don’t work so well in this format. Often, the vision on the screen becomes blurred which is both annoying and distracting when you are trying to keep track of what is happening.

It is good that Liebesman brings his A-game to the film because many other people involved certainly don’t. The usually good Liam Neeson breezes his way through the film (being tied up for most of the film certainly doesn’t help his acting range), while even Sam Worthington who has proved his worth in countless Australian films as well as Hollywood blockbusters such as Man On A Ledge and Avatar seems to just cruise his way through Wrath Of The Titans. He doesn’t even bother hiding  his Australian accent which sounds extremely out of place as he roams around Ancient Greece.

Wrath Of The Titans certainly isn’t a great film. Its storyline and acting seriously lets it down but if you enjoy big blockbusters that are non-stop action you’ll still find yourself in movie nirvana.

 

Dave’s review from Buzz Magazine

Stone me, shoot me, hang me even, but I have to admit that Wrath Of The Titans did entertain me. Yes there were a more than a few things wrong with it, especially if you are watching the IMAX conversion, but I was entertained for the entire film, which I’m pretty sure was the film’s aim.

Wrath Of The Titans picks up with Perseus (Sam Worthington – Man On A Ledge, The Dark Fields) trying to put his past and heritage behind him and work as a humble fisherman while protecting his son. However, around him the world is in shambles, the Gods are almost forgotten to the point where even the once mighty Zeus (Liam Neeson – The Grey, Unknown) has been weakened due to the lack of prayer.

But then things turn ever darker when Zeus is taken captive by his son, Ares (Edgar Ramirez – Saluda Al Diablo De Mi Parte, Carlos) and brother, Hades (Ralph Fiennes – Harry Potter & The Deathly Hallows Part 2, Coriolanus) as they attempt to release a sinister force.

Perseus then realises that in order to make the world a safe place for his son he will have to reluctantly team up with Agenor (Toby Kebbell – War Horse, The Veteran) and Andromeda (Rosamund Pike – Devil You Know, The Big Year) to stop the evil plan from destroying the world.

The thing that makes Wrath Of The Titans so damn enjoyable is that director, Jonathan Liebesman (Battle L.A., The Killing Room) knows how to shoot action scenes that make the audience go wow, and with a film like Wrath Of The Titans that is all you really want. I’m willing to overlook a somewhat weak script, the fact that at times the IMAX conversion is very blurry and even the fact that Perseus has an Australian accent so thick it would make Crocodile Dundee flush because at the end of the day I wanted this film to entertain me and it did that to a T.

I can’t stress highly enough though that this isn’t a film to see at IMAX. If anything did distract me from the brilliant action sequences it was the fact that in 3D at IMAX something of them look very blurry indeed, in fact it looked the same with the glasses on or off.

When its comes to casting the guys behind Wrath Of The Titans got it right. Worthington’s accent may become annoying at times, but the guy can act and looks good when fighting his away across ancient Greece. The only annoying thing is that it seems Liam Neeson is wasted in a role that seems him strapped to giant rocks for nearly three quarters of the film.

Wrath Of The Titans delivers exactly what you expect from an action film. A basic storyline, limited acting performances and scenes that will blow you out of your seat. A visual nirvana for action films.

Stars(3)

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5): Stars(2)

IMDB Rating: Wrath of the Titans (2012) on IMDb

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘Wrath Of The Titans′: Nil.

Trailer: