Tagged: Bokeem Woodbine

Summary: Peter Parker balances his life as an ordinary high school student in Queens with his superhero alter-ego Spider-Man, and finds himself on the trail of a new menace prowling the skies of New York City.

Year: 2017

Australian Cinema Release Date: 7th July 2017

Australian DVD Release Date: 18th October 2017

Country: United States

Director: Jon Watts

Screenwriter: John Francis Daley, Christopher Ford, Jonathan Goldstein, Chris McKenna, Erik Sommers, Jon Watts, Steve Ditko (original comic book), Jack Kirby (original comic book), Stan Lee (original comic book), Joe Simon (original comic book)

Cast: Isabella Amara (Sally), Tunde Adebimpe (Mr. Cobbwell), Abraham Attah (Abe), Michael Barbieri (Charles), Jacob Batalon (Ned), Garcelle Beauvais (Doris Toomes), Christopher Berry (Randy), Hannibal Buress (Coach Wilson), Michael Chernus (Phineas Mason/The Tinkerer), Kenneth Choi (Principal Morita), Kerry Condon (Friday (voice)), Jennifer Connolly (Karen/Suit Lady (voice)), Tyne Daley (Anne Marie Hoag), Ethan Dizon (Tiny), Robert Downey Jnr. (Iron Man/Tony Stark), Tiffany Espensen (Cindy), Chris Evans (Steve Rogers/Captain America), Jon Favreau (Happy Hogan), Donald Glover (Aaron Davis), Laura Harrier (Liz), Tom Holland (Peter Parker/Spider-Man), Michael Keaton (Adrian Toomes/Vulture), Stan Lee (Gary), Jorge Lendeborg Jr. (Jason), Selenis Leyva (Ms. Warren), Hemke Madera (Mr. Delmar), Michael Mando (Mac Gargan), Logan Marshall-Green (Jackson Brice/Shocker #1),Nitin Nohria (Dean Crimson), Gwenyth Paltrow (Pepper Potts), John Penick (Mr. Hapgood), Tony Revolori (Flash), Angourie Rice (Betty), Martin Starr (Mr. Harrington), Marisa Tomei (May Parker), J.J. Totah (Seymour), Gary Weeks (Agent Foster), Bokeem Woodbine (Herman Schultz/Shocker #2), Zendaya (Michelle)

Runtime: 133 mins

Classification: PG

 

OUR SPIDER-MAN: HOMECOMING REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

Kyle McGrath’s Spider-Man: Homecoming Review:

Spider-Man: Homecoming follows the title character and his alter ego Peter Parker on his early steps of becoming the hero he yearns to be.  After being enlisted by Tony Stark/Iron Man to assist in Captain America: Civil War (2016) Peter Parker is dropped off home, given a shiny new Spider-Man costume and pretty much told “don’t call us, we’ll call you”. Ambitious to prove himself worthy of being an Avenger he sets out to fight crime wherever he can while also struggling with the pitfalls of being an otherwise normal high school kid. His enthusiasm may soon gets the better of him when he discovers an underground operation in dealing weapons made from the stolen technology leftover from previous Avengers battles.

The elephant in the room with Spider-Man Homecoming is that this is the 3rd big screen incarnation of Spider-Man since 2002. This time the web crawler officially being a part of the Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU). The previous films each had their ups and downs but the general consensus seems to be that Sam Raimi’s Spider-Man films were better with Tobey Maguire making a better Peter Parker whereas The Amazing Spider-Man films found a better Spider-Man performance in Andrew Garfield with some other fan preferences such as Gwen Stacy as a love interest rather than skipping straight to Mary Jane Watson and mechanical web-shooters rather than organic (a distinction I never cared about).

Spider-Man Homecoming brings some new interesting things to the table while some others feel weaker. I believe Tom Holland walks the line quite well and works quite well as the younger less experienced and still in high school Peter Parker/Spider-Man.

Otherwise the films visuals and musical score felt a little generic never coming close to standing out as well as Sam Raimi and Danny Elfman did all the way back in 2002. Speaking of which the CGI of Homecoming itself looks not much better after 15 years of technological progress, often characters looking like something from a computer game or the transition between CGI to live action, such as Michael Keaton’s character leaving his “Vulture” wingsuit, appears quite jarring. Most of these large CGI sequences seem to take place at night too, it could have just been poor lighting in my cinema but it was extremely dark and felt like a possible shortcut with CGI usually looking more real with less lighting.

The film’s story itself reminded me of Kick-Ass be it without the style or comedy of Matthew Vaughn & Mark Millar with Peter trying to be a “friendly neighbourhood Spider-Man”. I found this to be an interesting new take on the character and something we’ve not yet seen in the MCU: a small time loser hero trying to do his thing in the shadow of giants like Thor, The Hulk or Captain America.

With any reboot certain changes had to be made so that the filmmakers aren’t just making the same film again. Flash Thompson Esther than being a stereotypical jock bully and symbol of everything Peter wished he could be is now a weedy little prick. The once elderly aunt May is now “hot aunt May” as the characters like to remind us and the less said about the new “MJ” the better.

Other major changes are that this is not another origin story. Rather picking up in the middle of Peter’s journey of self discovery as a super hero. An issue here is that while films like Tim Burton’s Batman or even the MCU’s The Incredible Hulk showed you don’t NEED to do an origin story to introduce your hero, you still do need to introduce them and Homecoming really does not. The feeling is that Spider-Man’s powers and back story don’t need to be given much thought because they’ve been done to death already. Well too bad. This is potentially people’s FIRST Spider-Man film and outside influences shouldn’t play any part in it. Not giving a proper set up because everyone should already know is like not introducing Harry Potter correctly in the film adaptation of Philosophers Stone because “well everyone’s read the book right?”

Peter’s character development this time comes more from his desire to prove himself than his feelings of guilt over his indirect involvement in his uncle’s death like before. This was an interesting change but to be honest the time Peter spends in this naive phase goes on way too long and most of the film seems to be him rescuing people from disasters he himself caused or his selfishly helping people in the first place only because he seeks glory and to be considered one of The Avengers. This would be like if Bruce Wayne in Batman Begins stayed in “scared angry man with a gun mode” until nearly the end of the film.

I think Peter himself is obsessed so much with the Avengers as a symptom of this film being obsessed with being considered part of the MCU. Again it’s an interesting way to approach at first but the Avengers just overshadow EVERYTHING in this film. Even the film’s title itself seems to more reference a “return home to the MCU” than anything in the film itself. The very first thing you see is a child’s drawing of them and the very last thing you’ll see is a post credits cameo from one of them and rarely 10 minutes will go by without some reference to them. Spider-Man’s motivation revolves around them, the film’s antagonist revolves around them and Tony Stark while barely making much of an appearance in the film is still focused on more than Michael Keaton as The Vulture leading to him feeling like a lackluster villain. Don’t get me wrong I’m glad he didn’t just want to turn the whole city into birds using a gas or something but when his entire scheme is spending 8 years stealing Avengers related tech, turning it into odd weapons and selling it out of the back of a van to random street thugs under bridges I have to ask “who cares?”.

The worst part of this is that the movie barely feels like it stars Spider-Man at all. Even his suit is some sort of Tony Stark designed super tech nonsense which only manages to downplay the ACTUAL superpowers Peter is supposed to have. Effectively he’s a super strong, super agile kid in a suit with a bunch of gadgets. It may as well also be what allows him to walk up walls as it does everything else for him!

If the film can’t go 10 minutes without an Avengers reference it also can’t seem to go 30 seconds without making a funny. In some kind of spray ‘n pray approach to comedy Homecoming is so afraid of being seen as taking itself too seriously that it hardly ever allows a scene to end without some gag tacked on just for the sake of it. Comedy relief only really works if you allow tension to build in the first place and when there are multiple gags happening it just drives a truck through the middle of a scene that’s designed to have you on the edge of your seat. Then when the big heavy scenes come along such as Michael Keaton trying to be intimidating they just don’t work. The film hasn’t earned that response from the audience because any other time it came close to a similar tone someone immediately then had to slip on a banana peel.

Spider-Man Homecoming unfortunately doesn’t hold a candle to Sam Raimi’s 2002 film. It’s lacking as an introduction to this new Spider-Man and feels too focused on latching on to the hugely popular MCU films to be comfortable in telling its own story and too eager to make its audience laugh to build any drama for its underdeveloped characters. As an addition to the mountain of superhero films it’s entertaining enough and different enough to warrant a viewing but not interesting enough to be very memorable.

 

 

Average Subculture Rating:  

 

 

IMDB Rating:  Spider-Man: Homecoming (2017) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment Spider-Man: Homecoming Reviews: N/A

 

Trailer:

Riddick

Summary: Left for dead on a sun-scorched planet, Riddick finds himself up against an alien race of predators.

Year: 2013

Australian Cinema Release Date: 12th September, 2013

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA, UK

Director: David Twohy

Screenwriter: David Twohy, Jim Wheat (characters), Ken Wheat (characters)

Cast: Andreas Apergis (Krone), Dave Bautista (Diaz), Noah Danby (Nunez), Vin Diesel (Riddick), Nolan Gerard Funk (Luna), Danny Blanco Hall (Falco), Lani Minella (Aereon VO), Jordi Molla (Santana), Matt Nable (Boss Johns), Neil Napier (Rubio), Conrad Pla (Vargas), Kate Sackhoff (Dahl), Raoul Trujillo (Lockspur), Karl Urban (Vaako), Bokeem Woodbine (Moss)

Runtime: 118 mins

Classification:MA15+

OUR REVIEWS/RATINGS OF ‘RIDDICK’:

Greg King: Stars(2.5)

Please check Greg’s review of ‘Riddick’ that is available on www.filmreviews.com.au

Nick Gardener: Stars(2)

Please check Nick’s review of ‘Riddick’ that is available on the Southern FM website.

Adam Ross: Stars(4)

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5): Stars(2.5)

IMDB Rating:  Riddick (2013) on IMDb

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘Riddick′: Please check The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep 49 for our in-depth review of ‘Riddick.’

Trailer:

The Host

Summary: The Host is a riveting story about the survival of love and the human spirit in a time of war. Our world has been invaded by an unseen enemy. Humans become hosts for these invaders, their minds taken over while their bodies remain intact. Most of humanity has succumbed.

Year: 2013

Australian Cinema Release Date: 28th March, 2013

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA

Director: Andrew Niccol

Screenwriter: Andrew Niccol, Stephanie Meyer (novel)

Cast: Jake Abel (Ian O’Shea), Tailinh Agoyo (Seeker Robin), Phil Austin (Seeker Waverley), Marcus Lyle Brown (Healer Ford), Chandler Canterbury (Jamie), Stacey Carino (Seeker Dawn), Evan Cleaver (Seeker Pavo), Jalen Coleman (Soul Nafisa), Stephen Conroy (Seeker Sands), J.D. Evermore (Trevor Stryder), Frances Fisher (Maggie), Andrea Frankle (Healer Skye), Raedeen Greer (Lily), Lee Hardee (Aaron), Mustafa Harris (Brandt), Boyd Holbrook (Kyle), David House (Seeker Summers), William Hurt (Jeb), Max Irons (Jared Howe), Shyaam Karra (Soul Anshu), Diane Kruger (The Seeker), Scott Lawrence (Doc), Jhil McEntyre (Soul Lake), Tatanka Means (Seeker Hawke), Jaylen Moore (Seeker Song), Yohance Myles (Seeker Nova), Michael L. Parker (Seeker Wolfe), Shawn Carter Peterson (Wes), Stephen Rider (Seeker Reed), Rachel Roberts (Soul Fleur), Saoirse Ronan (Melanie/Wanda), Alex Russell (Seeker Burns), Eric Schultz (Seeker Zephyr), Ruby Lou Smith (Soul Pearle), Brent Wendell Williams (Soul Winters), John Wilmot (Soul Raines), Bokeem Woodbine (Nate)

Runtime: 125 mins

Classification:M

Dave Griffiths’s ‘The Host’ Review: Please check Dave’s review of ‘The Host’ that is available on the Helium Entertainment Channel.

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘The Host′: Check Episode #26 of our The Good The Bad The Ugly Podcast for a more in-depth review of ‘The Host’.

Rating: 2/5

IMDB Rating:The Host (2013) on IMDb

Summary:A factory worker, Douglas Quaid, begins to suspect that he is a spy after visiting Rekall – a company that provides its clients with implanted fake memories of a life they would like to have led – goes wrong and he finds himself on the run.

Year: 2012

Australian Cinema Release Date: 23rd August, 2012

Australian DVD Release Date: 20th December, 2012

Country: United States/Canada

Director: Len Wiseman

Screenwriter: Mark Bomback, Philip K. Dick (short story), Dan O’Bannon, Jon Povil, Ronald Shusett, Kurt Wimmer

Cast: Kate Beckinsale (Lori Quaid), Jessica Biel (Melina), Emily Chang (Newscaster Lien Nguyen), John Cho (McClane), Bryan Cranston (Cohaagen), Colin Farrell (Douglas Quaid/Carl Hauser), Will Yun Lee (Marek), Bill Nighy (Matthias), Simon Sinn (Murray), Dylan Smith (Hammond), Bokeem Woodbine (Harry)

Runtime: 113 mins

Classification:M

Dave Griffiths’s ‘Total Recall’ Review:

It seems most sci-fi fans are worried that the 2012 remake of Total Recall will be nothing like the original because it doesn’t have Arnie. Perhaps what they should be more worried about is the fact that the remake doesn’t seem to have a soul. Changes are most cinema goers will be won over by its sleek production design but if they dig a little further they’ll soon realise that this film has as much heart as the Tinman.

Total Recall is set in the future at a time when the Earth only has two countries fit for habitat, The Colony (Australia) and The United Federation of Britain. The two ‘colonies’ are on the brink of war with each other with Chancellor Cohaagen (Bryan Cranston – Rock Of Ages, TV’S Breaking Bad) from the UFB claiming that Matthias (Bill Nighy – Wrath Of The Titans, The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel) from the Colony is a terrorist hell-bent on destruction. In the middle of the disagreement are people such as Douglas Quaid (Colin Farrell – Fright Night, Horrible Bosses) a factory worker who travels from the Colony through the Earth to the UFB for work each day.

Quaid’s mundane life with his wife Lori (Kate Beckinsale – Underworld: Awakening, Contraband) soon gets a jolt of it’s own however as he tries to find some meaning for his life by going to a place called Rekall (despite advice from his best friend Harry (Bokeem Woodbine – Letting Go, TV’S Southland) not to), a centre that provides memories for a cost. Quaid’s attempt soon sees him being accused of being a spy and then being hunted down by his wife while being helped by the mysterious freedom-fighter Melina (Jessica Biel – The Tall Man, New Years Eve).

Director Len Wiseman (Die Hard 4.0, Underworld: Evolution) does a great job making this film look good. He goes for the similar always raining, always dreary look that he did so well with the Underworld franchise. He also directs the fight scenes in the same Underworld style, Kate Beckinsale’s groin take-down of Colin Farrell is a ripper, but it does feel that Wiseman is the only one lifting his weight.

The production design team seem to have been doing a lot of DVD watching because they have ‘borrowed’ a stack of things from Star Wars: The Phantom Menace, Blade Runner and The Fifth Element while the quite large script writing team did no service to Philip K. Dick’s short story at all. Instead of having the audience in suspense over whether the events that are occurring on screen are really happening or are just part of Douglas’s Rekall experience the script literally screams “THIS IS REALLY HAPPENING, YES IT IS!!!” while Lori may be set up as a top notch cop but most of the time throughout the film she seems inept at her job and seems to mutter ‘shit’ hell of a lot.

The poor actors really had very little to work with at all. Beckinsale’s talents are completely wasted while poor Jessica Biel’s character of Melina had no characterization whatsoever, despite the fact she is one of the film’s most important characters. The only member of the cast to get anything out of Total Recall at all was Colin Farrell who at last got the opportunity to remind the world that he is an action hero who is capable of delivering dramatic lines… sadly cheesy ones seem to outnumber his dramatic ones here though.

Total Recall does win you over with its great visuals but the fact it has no substance will most likely mean you won’t be watching it over and over.

Other Subculture Media Reviews of Total Recall: http://www.helium.com/items/2366190-movie-reviews-total-recall-2012.

Rating: 2.5/5 Stars

IMDB Rating:Total Recall (2012) on IMDb