Tagged: Kelly Marcel

Fifty Shades Of Grey

Summary:  Based on the popular series of novels by E.L. James Fifty Shades Of Grey is told by the perspective of Anastasia Steele (Dakota Johnson) a young college student whose life is changed forever when her housemate, Kate (Eloise Mumford) asks her to fill in for her and do an interview with the mysterious Christian Grey (Jamie Dornan).

To her surprise the virginal Anastasia feels a connection with Christian and while at first it seems they are about to enter a seemingly normal relationship things seem to be held by Christian refusing to give in to his feelings. Soon Anastasia discovers that Christian has a hidden side of his life, a side that excites her but a side that isn’t sure whether she wants to be part of or not.

Year: 2015

Australian Cinema Release Date: 12th February, 2015

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA

Director: Sam Taylor-Johnson

Screenwriter: Kelly Marcel, E.L. James (novel)

Cast: Andrew Airlie (Mr. Grey), Elliat Albrecht (Olivia), Bruce Dawson (Mr. Clayton), Anne Marie DeLuise (Dr. Greene), Jamie Dornan (Christian Grey), Jennifer Ehle (Carla), Emily Fonda (Martina), Luke Grimes (Elliott Grey), Marcia Gay Harden (Mrs. Grey), Dakota Johnson (Anastasia Steele), Anthony Konechny (Paul Clayton), Max Martini (Taylor), Eloise Mumford (Kate), Dylan Neal (Bob), Rita Ora (Mia Grey), Victor Rasuk (Jose), Callum Keith Rennie (Ray), Rachel Skarsten (Andrea)

Runtime: 125 mins

Classification: MA15+

 

OUR FIFTY SHADES OF GREY REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

David Griffiths:

Worst nightmare or most eagerly anticipated film of the year? There seems to be no middle ground with Fifty Shades Of Grey and that in turn has become a dangerous thing. Some movie markets around the world decided that this movie was so critic proof that they wouldn’t even run any Media Screenings of the film something that you can only wonder has led to some critics scratching their claws and belting this film into submission as only Christian Grey could. But this is a film that also raises another pretty serious question as well. Did critics go into the film wanting to bash it, because there is no way that this film has deserved the one and half star reviews that it has been picking up.

Let’s be honest Fifty Shades Of Grey is not a brilliant film, but it is an interesting film and director Sam Taylor-Johnson and screenwriter Kelly Marcel (who also wrote the brilliant Saving Mr. Banks) have done all they can to turn what is pretty much a trashy novel into something worthy of watching on the big screen.

Credit does need to be paid to Taylor-Johnson and Marcel as this could have very easily turned into the kind of film that would be frequented by men wearing rain-coats instead of becoming what it has – an intriguing film that although billed to be a sex romp has enough storyline with it to become a Notebook-esque film with whips and chains. The fact is though that Marcel realises early on that this film wouldn’t work if it were simply just bondage sex scene after bondage sex scene so she does something you feel that many screenwriters wouldn’t and brings a great deal of characterization into the film. In turn the audience find themselves embedded in this strange relationship and certainly wants to know what is going to happen next.

Marcel’s screenplay also takes this film into some dark areas, but not the ones that many have decided to throw at this film before they haven’t seen it. Fifty Shades Of Grey is never a film that glorifies rape, sexual abuse or domestic violence, instead it becomes the character study of a man damaged by sexual abuse himself and the impact that it has on his adult relationships. It also becomes a film that explores the sexual awakening of a young woman in a way that has been previously glimpsed at in films such as The Story Of O and Secretary. This character driven storyline and the strong almost suspense feeling generated by the ‘will they, won’t they’ aspect of the film certainly lifts the film above what many thought it would turn out to be.

The knives have also been out for Jamie Dornan whom many believe doesn’t really fit the role of Christian Grey. But really he isn’t as bad as many has said he has been. Sure he may not have the charisma of someone like a Ryan Gosling but watching this film soon makes you realise that neither does Grey. Grey isn’t a flamboyant Bruce Wayne like millionaire he’s more your brooding David Boreanaz style wealth monger and Dornan pulls that off fairly well.

The star here though is Dakota Johnson. The star on the rise who has previously had smaller roles in films like Need For Speed, The Social Network and 21 Jump Street really announces herself in a role that does actually test her as an actress. Johnson is called upon to deliver most of the nudity and she doesn’t flinch once while also delivering a performance that most young actresses in a romantic role would be more than happy with.

Strangely while Fifty Shades Of Grey has been savaged you get an eerie feeling after watching it that had this been a French film with subtitles and not based on books that have been labeled ‘Mummy porn’ than this would have been a film that many critics may have warned to for it’s risqué content. As a film though Fifty Shades Of Grey is serviceable, the characters are likable and the storyline intriguing. Plus the best way to show how is does work is that if you stick to the end there is a good chance you’ll want to know where the story ends up… so hopefully that make a sequel and don’t leave us dangling… from Grey’s roof.

Stars(3)

 

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5):  Stars(3)

 

IMDB Rating: Fifty Shades of Grey (2015) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment Fifty Shades Of Grey reviews: You can also read our Fifty Shades of Grey review on The Book The Film The T-Shirt.

Trailer:

Saving Mr Banks

Summary: When Walt Disney’s daughters begged him to make a movie of their favourite book, P.L. Travers’ “Mary Poppins,” he made them a promise that he didn’t realize would take 20 years to keep. In his quest to obtain the rights, Walt (Tom Hanks) comes up against a curmudgeonly, uncompromising writer (Emma Thompson) who has absolutely no intention of letting her beloved magical nanny get mauled by the Hollywood machinery. It is only when he reaches into his own childhood that Walt discovers the truth about the ghosts that haunt her, and together make one of the most endearing films in cinematic history..

Year: 2013

Australian Cinema Release Date: 26th December, 2013

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA, UK, Australia

Director: John Lee Hancock

Screenwriter: Kelly Marcel, Sue Smith

Cast: Michelle Arthur (Polly), Kathy Baker (Tommie), Melissa Bickerton (Mrs. Corry), Lily Bigham (Biddy), Claire Bocking (Nanny Claire), Annie Rose Buckley (Ginty), Kimberly D’Armond (Katie Nanna), Lynly Ehrlich (Mrs. DaGradi), Colin Farrell (Travers Goff), Paul Giamatti (Ralph), Rachel Griffiths (Aunt Ellie), Tom Hanks (Walt Disney), Kristopher Kyer (Dick Van Dyke), Andy McPhee (Mr. Belhatchett), B.J. Novak (Robert Sherman), Ginger Pauley (Joyce Sherman), Melanie Paxson (Dolly), Jason Schwartzman (Richard Sherman), Victoria Summer (Julie Andrews), Dendrie Taylor (Lillian Disney), Emma Thompson (P.L. Travers), Ronan Vibert (Diarmuid Russell), Thomas R. Waters (Andrew Dutton), Bradley Whitford (Don DaGradi), Ruth Wilson (Margaret Goff)

Runtime: 126 mins

Classification:PG

OUR SAVING MR. BANKS REVIEWS & RATINGS

Greg King: Stars(4.5)

Please check Greg’s review of ‘Saving Mr. Banks’ that is available on http://www.filmreviews.net.au/

David Griffiths:

Do you remember “Mary Poppins?” The all singing and dancing affair with Julie Andrews, Dick Van Dyke and some penguins thrown in for good measure. Well a film set during the making of the 1964 family favourite film “Mary Poppins”  doesn’t exactly have the allure of films such as “Hitchcock” or “Me And Orson Welles”, but don’t be put off because “Saving Mr. Banks” is a film that is pure cinematic masterpiece. While award wins may show that director John Lee Hancock’s last film, “The Blind Side,” was the better film that theory is without a doubt incorrect because “Saving Mr. Banks” is one of the finest films to have come out of Hollywood in a long time.

Many cinema lovers perhaps don’t realise that “Mary Poppins” almost didn’t happen. The fascinating script of “Saving Mr. Banks” chronicles as the reluctant Poppins creator P.L. Travers (Emma Thompson) reluctantly has to make the decision to travel to Los Angeles and talk with Walt Disney (Tom Hanks) about the possibility of her much loved character hitting the big screen.

The idea of Mary becoming an animated buddy for the likes of Mickey Mouse is just too much for Travers and she plans on travelling to L.A. and pretty much telling Disney where he can stick his project. However, money is now a problem for her and she finds herself holding off on saying no to Disney, instead she finds herself reluctantly bonding with her driver, Ralph (Paul Giamatti) and having to sit down with the ‘in-her-eyes-annoying’ Sherman brothers (B.J. Novak and Jason Schwartzmann) – the two men charged with the task of bringing music into Mary Poppins’ world.

At the same time the audience is shown the inspiration behind the Poppins’ book Travers’ relationship with her drunken but loving father Travers Goff (Colin Farrell) and the arrival of her Aunt Ellie (Rachel Griffiths) on the scene.

There is so much to love about Saving Mr. Banks.” Firstly the screenwriting team absolutely nail the characters involved. Those who were close to P.L. Travers and Walt Disney have seen this film and been surprised by just how realistic the characters are. Then there is of course the fact that those same screenwriters have almost brought a sense of suspense to the film. Once you become engrossed in the plot you simply forget that “Mary Poppins” did make the big screen and you find yourself waiting with baited breath as Travers and Disney battle over whether the film will be made.

The other part of “Saving Mr. Banks” that will stun its audience is the flashback sequences to outback Queensland. Not only does this section bring some real heartfelt moments to the film but the scenes allow cinemagoers to once again since the acting stylings of one Colin Farrell. Mr. Farrell has delivered some real dogs of films recently (anybody else see “Total Recall”?) so it’s good to see him embracing the role of Travers Goff and putting in a performance that is worthy of some award nominations.

Also joining Farrell with outstanding performances in “Saving Mr. Banks” are Emma Thompson and Tom Hanks. Thompson becomes the very-British Travers alarmingly well while Hanks puts in a surprising performance of Disney. Technically Hanks shares no physical resemblance to Disney at all but captures the spirit of the man in a way that is sure to garnish him more award glory. This performance on the back of his work in “Captain Phillips” just goes to show why Hanks is one of the better actors of the modern generations.

The words cinematic masterpiece shouldn’t be used lightly but that is exactly what “Saving Mr. Banks” is. This is a charming film that recaptures the magic of Hollywood.

Stars(5)

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5): Stars(4.5)

IMDB Rating:  Saving Mr. Banks (2013) on IMDb

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘Saving Mr. Banks′: Please check our Saving Mr. Banks review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep 63.

Trailer: