Tagged: Steven Soderbergh

 

To celebrate the 40th anniversary of the Oscar-winning Vietnam cult war epic this July, STUDIOCANAL will release a special, never-before-seen cut restored with breathtaking realism by Coppola himself to the highest and finest audio and visual standards, for a truly visceral cinema experience.

Forty years after its original release, audiences will get the chance to experience Apocalypse Now Final Cut, a never-before-seen and newly restored cut of Coppola’s spectacular cinematic masterpiece in a way which the director believes looks better than it has ever looked and sounds better than it has ever sounded. STUDIOCANAL and Coppola are “thrilled beyond measure to present the best version of the film to the world”, with special theatrical screenings planned across UK, Germany and Australia.

Restored from the original negative for the first time ever, Apocalypse Now Final Cut is Coppola’s most complete version of his multi-awarded classic -a haunting journey into madness that fascinated generations of movie lovers and now feels even more monumentally alive than ever before.

Apocalypse Now was nominated for 8 Academy Awards® (including Best Picture) and won 2 Academy Award® for Best Cinematography and Best Sound, 2 BAFTAs for Best Direction and Best Supporting Actor and the Palme d’Or in Cannes. Starring Academy Award® winner Marlon Brando (1972, Best Actor, The Godfather), Academy Award® winner Robert Duvall(1983, Best Actor, Tender Mercies), Golden Globe® winner Martin Sheen (2001, Best Actor – TV Series, “The West Wing”), Academy Award® nominee Dennis Hopper (1986, Best Supporting Actor, Hoosiers)Academy Award® nominee Laurence Fishburne (1993, Best Actor, What’s Love Got to Do with It), and Academy Award® nominee Harrison Ford (1985, Best Actor, Witness), the film follows Army Captain Willard (Martin Sheen), a troubled man sent on a dangerous and mesmerizing odyssey into Cambodia to assassinate a renegade American colonel named Kurtz (Marlon Brando), who has succumbed to the horrors of war and barricaded himself in a remote outpost.

The best visual and sound technologies have been used to present Coppola’s true vision of the film: one that delivers deep, visceral visual and auditory impact. “The audience will be able to see, hear and feel this film how I always hoped it could be—from the first ‘bang’ to the final whimper” said the film-maker.

 This is the first time the original negative has ever been scanned and over 11 months and 2,700 hours were spent on cleaning and restoring the film’s 300,173 frames.

 The Apocalypse Now Final Cut restoration has been brought to life through ultra-vivid picture quality with Dolby Vision®, delivering spectacular colours never before seen on a screen, with highlights that are up to 40 times brighter, and blacks that are 10 times darker.

Apocalypse Now Final Cut has been mixed in Dolby Atmos® to offer a truly immersive sound experience and it has been enhanced Meyer Sound Laboratories’ newly developed Sensual Sound™, a technology engineered to output audio below the limits of human hearing.

The film premiered in Tribeca on April 28th and will get a special theatrical run for its 40th anniversary of the film in AUSTRALIA on JULY  25, 2019.

The theatrical screenings will include a video introduction by Francis Ford Coppola, and selected screenings will also feature a Q&A between Coppola and Steven Soderbergh, filmed at the 2019 Tribeca Film Festival.

Russell Crowe

At the moment, award season buzz is centering largely around the magnificent performances of Matthew McConaughey and Jared Leto in “Dallas Buyers Club.” The two men’s performances have reminded a lot of film journalists at how well some actors have depicted gay characters on screen over the years, so let’s take a look at some of the actors who played gay characters not only well, but tastefully and with respect.

Russell Crowe: Yes, it may come as a complete surprise to many, but the great Russell Croweonce played a homosexual character on the big screen. It was before Crowe was making Hollywood blockbusters like “Gladiator,” so people can be excused if they haven’t heard of the film, but it was in an Australian film called “The Sum Of Us.” If you haven’t seen it, then you may certainly want to hunt it down and give it a watch because directors Geoff Burton and Kevin Dowling did a pretty decent job. The film itself has Crowe play Jeff Mitchell a young gay man searching for Mr. Right. His search brings him closer to his father, Harry Mitchell (Jack Thompson), who is now in the look for Miss Right. Touching, yet entertaining, the film is just a true romantic drama.

Ian Somerhalder: Long before he was playing vampire Damon Salvatore in “The Vampire Diaries,” Ian Somerhalder appeared in the very underrated flick “The Rules Of Attraction.” The flick was closely linked to “American Psycho,” was directed by Roger Avary and never really received the recognition it deserved as its alternative style of film-making made it an absolute gem. Somerhalder played Paul Denton, a young gay college student, who was disillusioned with the ‘queens’ around him and finds himself falling in love with the troubled and nasty Sean Bateman (James Van Der Beek) who was accidentally breaking hearts right across the campus.

Heath Ledger and Jake Gyllenhaal: How could anybody put together a list of actors who have played gay characters without mentioning Jake Gyllenhaal and the late Heath Ledger? When Ang Lee first put together “Brokeback Mountain,” even he admitted he wasn’t sure how the film would be received, after all was there a market for a film about a gay relationship between two cowboys? He need not have worried as the film went on to record 100 award wins worldwide, including three Oscars. It also earned Oscar nominations for Michelle Williams and the two male leads Heath Ledger and Jake Gyllenhaal. Ledger and Gyllenhaal put in brilliant performances as they played Jack Twist and Ennis Del Mar, two young cowboys involved in a passionate yet troubled relationship.

Michael Douglas and Matt Damon: When it was first announced that Michael Douglas would be playing Liberace and Matt Damon his boyfriend, Scott Thorson, the film world scoffed. In fact, they more than scoffed because the roles both seemed so out of character for both actors that many thought the film would just not work and it was pretty much decided that “Behind The Candelabra” was going to become a car-wreck of a film. People should never have doubted the creative mind of director Steven Soderbergh because he brought out the best in both actors, so much so that film critic Adam Ross was quoted on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show as saying “Douglas was so far into character it looked like he wanted to jump Damon between takes.” So good were Douglas and Damon’s performances that both have had their names mentioned during awards season.

Sean Penn: Another actor who ended up becoming an award winner while playing a gay character was Sean Penn. Penn picked up the Best Actor Academy Award in 2009 when he appeared in Gus Van Sant’s film “Milk” in the title role – playing gay activist Harvey Milk. His fellow co-star Josh Brolin also picked up the Best Supporting Actor Academy Award for playing Dan White in the film that had critics ecstatic upon its release.

Tom Hanks: The great Tom Hanks also picked up an Oscar for playing a gay character when back in 1993. He played Andrew Beckett, a lawyer suffering from AIDS in the “Philadelphia.” The film not only educated the world on how hard it is for somebody infected with AIDS, but also dealt a valuable lesson about homophobia as Beckett is forced to work with a homophobic lawyer named Joe Miller (Denzel Washington). The film may be over 20 years now, but if you have never seen “Philadelphia” then it is certainly worth taking a look at.

With so many actors winning awards over the years for playing gay characters then it may seem like Mr. McConaughey and Mr. Leto might be in a good position as we all head into Awards season.

The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show

Recently the hosts of ‘The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show’ came up with their favourite directors here’s who is made their lists.

ADAM ROSS’ LIST

David Fincher

  • Anthony Minghella
  • Shane Meadows
  • Todd Field
  • Bobby Farrelly
  • Peter Farrelly
  • Andrew Dominik
  • Clint Eastwood
  • Rian Johnson
  • John Hillcoat
  • Alfonso Cuaron
  • Steven Spielberg
  • Paul Greengrass
  • Ben Affleck
  • Adam McKay
  • Steve McQueen
  • Ang Lee
  • Matthew Vaughn
  • Christopher Nolan
  • Joe Carnahan
  • Derek Cianfrance
  • Todd Solondz
  • Paul Verhoeven
  • John McTiernan
  • Kathryn Bigelow
  • Peter Weir
  • Michael Mann
  • Sam Mendes
  • Robert Zemeckis
  • Ron Howard
  • Terrence Malick
  • Brian De Palma
  • Alexander Payne
  • Sam Raimi
  • David Cronenberg
  • Ridley Scott
  • Paul Thomas Anderson
  • Darren Aronofsky
  • James Cameron
  • Martin Scorsese
  • David Fincher

 

DAVID GRIFFITHS’ LIST

Steven Soderbergh

  • Rob Zombie
  • Alkinos Tsilimidos
  • Ben Affleck
  • Lars von Trier
  • Danny Boyle
  • Steven Soderbergh
  • Woody Allen
  • Martin Scorsese
  • Larry Clark
  • Gus Van Sant
  • Kelly Reichardt
  • Christopher Nolan
  • Rian Johnson
  • Joss Whedon
  • Kevin Williamson
  • Kevin Smith

 

GREG KING

Quentin Tarantino

  • Alfred Hitchcock
  • Sam Peckinpah
  • Stanley Kubrick
  • Christopher Nolan
  • David Fincher
  • Ridley Scott
  • Tony Scott
  • Woody Allen
  • James Cameron
  • Ben Affleck
  • Quentin Tarrantino
  • Clint Eastwood
  • Martin Scorsese
  • Steven Spielberg

 

NICK GARDENER’S LIST

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  • Steven Spielberg
  • James Cameron
  • Ridley Scott
  • Christopher Nolan
  • Errol Morris
  • Ben Affleck
  • Mike Leigh
  • Ang Lee
  • Richard Linklater
  • John Ford
  • Paul Thomas Anderson
  • Roman Palanski
  • Quinten Tarantino
  • David Fincher
  • Peter Weir
  • David Lynch
  • Francis Coppolla
  • Orson Welles
  • Martin Scorsese
  • Stanley Kubrick
  • Woody Allen
  • Alfred Hitchcock

Behind The Candelabra

Summary: Before Elvis, before Elton John, Madonna and Lady Gaga, there was Liberace: virtuoso pianist, outrageous entertainer and flamboyant star of stage and television. A name synonymous with showmanship, extravagance and candelabras, he was a world-renowned performer with a flair that endeared him to his audiences and created a loyal fan base spanning his 40-year career. Liberace lived lavishly and embraced a lifestyle of excess both on and off stage. In summer 1977, handsome young stranger Scott Thorson walked into his dressing room and, despite their age difference and seemingly different worlds, the two embarked on a secretive five-year love affair. Behind the Candelabra takes a behind-the-scenes look at their tempestuous relationship – from their first meeting backstage at the Las Vegas Hilton to their bitter and public break-up.

Year: 2013

Australian Cinema Release Date: 25th July, 2013

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA

Director: Steven Soderbergh

Screenwriter: Richard LaGravenese, Scott Thorson (book), Alex Thorleifson (book)

Cast: Harvey J. Alperin (Joel Strote), Pat Asanti (George Liberace), Dan Aykroyd (Seymour Heller), Scott Bakula (Bob Black), Garrett M. Brown (Joe Carracappa), Barbara Brownell (Angie Liberace), Jerry Clarke (Dr. Ronald Daniels), Charlotte Crossley (June), Matt Damon (Scott Thorson), Michael Douglas (Liberace), Nikea Gamby-Turner (Dorothy), Boyd Holbrook (Cary James), Cheyenne Jackson (Billy Leatherwood), Nicky Katt (Mr. Y), Casey Kramer (Dora Liberace), Deborah Lacey (Gladys), Kristin Lindquist (Billy), Rob Lowe (Dr. Jack Startz), Jane Morris (Rose Carracappa), Mick O’Malley (Tracy Schnelker), Tom Papa (Ray Arnett), Bruce Ramsay (Carlucci), Debbie Reynolds (Frances Liberace), Susan Todd (Sue), Kiff VandenHeuvel (Wayne), Eric Zuckerman (Lou)

Runtime: 119 mins

Classification:M

SUBCULTURE MEDIA/THE GOOD THE BAD THE UGLY FILM SHOW REVIEWS/RATINGS OF ‘BEHIND THE CANDELABRA’:

Greg King: Stars(4)

Please check Greg’s review of ‘Behind The Candelabra’ that is available on www.filmreviews.net.au

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5): Stars(4)

IMDB Rating:  Behind the Candelabra (2013) on IMDb

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘Behind The Candelabra′: Please check Episode #42 of The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show for more reviews of ‘Man Of Steel’.

Trailer:

Side Effects

Summary: Side Effects is a provocative thriller about Emily and Martin (Rooney Mara and Channing Tatum), a successful New York couple whose world unravels when a new drug prescribed by Emily’s psychiatrist (Jude Law) – intended to treat anxiety – has unexpected side effects.

Year: 2013

Australian Cinema Release Date: 28th February, 2013

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA

Director: Steven Soderbergh

Screenwriter: Scott Z. Burns

Cast: Sasha Bardey (Dr. Peter Joubert), David Costabile (Carl), Victor Cruz (NYPD Officer Beahan), J. Claude Deering (Zach), Susan Gross (Susan), Mamie Gummer (Kayla), Russell G. Jones (Jeffrey Childs), Timothy Klein (Transporting Officer Klein), Jude Law (Dr. Jonathan Banks), Rooney Mara (Emily Taylor), Mitchell Michalisyzn (Ezra Banks), Michelle Vergara Moore (Joan), Vinessa Shaw (Diedre Banks), Channing Tatum (Martin Taylor), Vladimi Verssailles (Augustin), Catherine Zeta-Jones (Dr. Victoria Siebert)

Runtime: 106 mins

Classification:MA15+

Dave Griffiths’s ‘Side Effects’ Review: 

Director Steve Soderbergh (‘Magic Mike’, ‘Haywire’) has been pretty vocal about the fact that his latest release ‘Side Effects’ will be his final feature film and that he will now turn to a career in television. It seems an abrupt ending for a person that has been one of the most prolific filmmakers of the last decade, and if ‘Side Effects’ is to be his last film it will be a real shame as it is one of the very few average films he has released during his career.

‘Side Effects’ sees Emily Taylor (Rooney Mara – ‘Ain’t Them Bodies Saints’, ‘The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo) is struggling with life, it seems that her constant battle with depression has once again returned and she is also not coping with the fact that her husband Martin (Channing Tatum – ‘Magic Mike’, ’21 Jump Street’) has been released from prison after serving a term for insider trading.

After a suicide attempt in an underground car park Emily is referred to Dr. Jonathan Banks (Jude Law – ‘Rise Of The Guardians’, ‘Anna Karenina’) who tries to help the young woman get her life back on track. Determined to help her he seeks out her old doctor, Dr. Victoria Siebert (Catherine Zeta-Jones – ‘Broken City’, ‘Playing For Keeps) who suggests that he try some of the new medications that are on the market. It soon begins to look like Emily is on the road to recovery but that soon ends when it seems the side effects of one of the drugs results in her murdering Martin.

As a film ‘Side Effects’ is likely to frustrate a lot of it’s audience. While the closing credits are rolling you are likely to find yourself thinking ‘that was a pretty decent crime film’, but when you start to really think about it later on you find yourself pulling apart the plot and you soon realise that the ‘crime element’ of the story falls into place way too easily and that it is highly unbelievable. In fact after much though you’ll realise that ‘Side Effects’ is pretty much just an extended (and rather poor) episode of ‘Law & Order’.

It is a real surprise that Steven Soderbergh has realised such a slack thriller. In the past Soderbergh has released suspenseful action films such as ‘Haywire’ while even his more experimental films like ‘The Girlfriend Experience’ have had a real edge to them… something that ‘Side Effects’ certainly doesn’t have, hence it’s television movie feel.

In another surpise for a Soderbergh film the performances of most of the cast are bland to say the least. Rooney Mara really had the chance to step-up and deliver a powerful performance but she doesn’t, while it seems that Catherine Zeta-Jones and Channing Tatum simply breezed their way through their roles without really trying. The only person who seems to make an effort is Jude Law who is a lot better than what he was in ‘Anna Karenina’.

‘Side Effects’ is a real disappointment, it may entertain you while you are in the cinema but you are guaranteed to think ill of it once you’ve had a chance to really think about it.

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘Side Effects′: Check Episode #22 of our The Good The Bad The Ugly Podcast for a more in-depth review of ‘Side Effects’. Dave Griffiths also has another review of ‘Side Effects’ available on the Helium Entertainment Channel.

Rating: 3/5

IMDB Rating: Side Effects (2013) on IMDb

Summary: Set in the world of male strippers, Magic Mike is directed by Steven Soderbergh and stars Channing Tatum in a story inspired by his real life. The film follows Mike as he takes a young dancer called The Kid under his wing and schools him in the fine arts of partying, picking up women, and making easy money.

Year: 2012

Australian Cinema Release Date: 26th July, 2012

Australian DVD Release Date: 26th November, 2012

Country: United States

Director: Steven Soderbergh

Screenwriter: Reid Corolin

Cast: Daria Badanina (Stephanie), Matt Bomer (Ken), Reid Carolin (Paul), Erica Day (Carla), Kate Easton (Liz), Caitlin Gerard (Kim), Cody Horn (Brooke), Eric Ian (Eric), Gabriel Iglesias (Tobias), Micaela Johnson (Portia), James Martin Kelly (Sal), Riley Keough (Nora), Melissa LeEllen (Sarah), Joe Manganiello (Big Dick Richie), Matthew McConaughey (Dallas), Olivia Munn (Joanna), Kevin Nash (Tarzan), Alex Pettyfer (Adam), Michael Roark (Ryan), Adam Rodriguez (Tito), George A. Sack (George), Channing Tatum (Magic Mike), Jennifer Thompson (Penelope), Denise Vasi (Ruby)

Runtime: 110 mins

Classification: MA+

Dave Griffiths’s ‘Magic Mike’ Review:

Magic Mike became a whipping boy before it even reached the cinema. There wasn’t a comedian or even film-lover who wasn’t cracking jokes about how bad a film that tells the story of Channing Tatum’s life was going to be. But one man has saved this film from becoming a complete joke, that man is director Steven Soderbergh (Haywire, Contagion). With Magic Mike Soderbergh once again shows that no matter what the topic he can make a film look good.

As previously mentioned Magic Mike is a semi-autobiographical look at Channing Tatum’s (21 Jump Street, The Vow) time spent as a stripper. Here Tatum plays Magic Mike the lead star of Dallas’s (Matthew McConaughey – Mud, The Paperboy) crew of strippers that are quickly raking in the big bucks for him.

After meeting him on a worksite Mike introduces Adam (Alex Pettyfer – In Time, Beastly) to the crew and soon he too finds success. But as the dark side of stripping raises his head and Mike finds himself attracted to Adam’s sister, Brooke (Cody Horn – Occupant, Violet & Daisy), Mike wonders if it’s time to start a new career path.

There is no point saying Magic Mike is a terrific film, it’s not as it has some major flaws, but it is still a lot better than the train-wreck many predicted it would be. Soderbegh uses his alternative style of filmmaking to achieve the best effect out of the sometimes dramatic storyline but still the film falters as it relies too heavily on dance scenes to move the story along, and then frustratingly seems to hold back when the storyline begins to delve into some of the more gritty elements.

For example Dallas is set up as a somewhat dangerous guy. There is a brilliant scene where he confronts Mike about his intentions yet when called upon to do so the threats seem to go nowhere which seems completely out of line with Dallas’ character. Likewise the drug-side of the storyline is just skirted on when it really should have been a main focus.

The one thing you can’t fault Magic Mike for however is the acting. Channing Tatum finally steps up and shows that he does have some acting talent to go along with his dancing ability while Cody Horn shows that she is certainly an actress to watch in the future. But the star of Magic Mike is Matthew McConaughey who puts in a blinding dramatic performance (and shows that he is well ripped for a 40-year-old) that shows as a character actor he is certainly back in the game.

Magic Mike isn’t as cheesy as some would have expected. It’s a good watch that you feel could have been even better.

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘Magic Mike’: http://www.helium.com/items/2353007-movie-reviews-magic-mike-2012.

Rating: 3/5 Stars

IMDB Rating: Magic Mike (2012) on IMDb