Tagged: Wayne Duvall

Summary:  Following the events at home, the Abbott family now face the terrors of the outside world. Forced to venture into the unknown, they realize the creatures that hunt by sound are not the only threats lurking beyond the sand path.

Year: 2021

Cinema Release Dates: 27th May 2021 (Australia), 24th June 2021 (Thailand), 3rd June 2021 (UK), 28th May 2021 (USA)

VOD Release Dates: TBA

Country: USA

Director: John Krasinski

Screenwriter: John Krasinski

Cast: Emily Blunt (Evelyn Abbott), Chad Corbi (Jim Chimney), Wayne Duvall (Roger), Djimon Hounsou (Man On Island), Noah Jupe (Marcus Abbott), John Krasinski (Lee Abbott), Scoot McNairy (Marina Man), Cillian Murphy (Emmett), Millicent Simmonds (Regan Abbott)

Running Time: 97 mins

Classification: M (Australia), 13 (Thailand), 15 (UK), PG-13 (USA)

OUR A QUIET PLACE PART II REVIEWS

David Griffiths’ A Quiet Place Part II Review:

Cinemas are back open and the movies are back with a BANG! There has been no ‘slow-opening’ when it comes to blockbusters being released with one of the most eagerly anticipated films of the year opening this week… after a delay of exactly a year (thanks Covid!!!).

Back in 2018 genre film fans were shocked when real-life husband and wife team John Krasinski (TV’S The Office) and Emily Blunt (Edge Of Tomorrow) brought their passion project, titled A Quiet Place, to the big screen. The film itself was a virtual cinematic masterpiece and fans begun asking for a sequel almost straight-away. Now that sequel has landed with A Quiet Place Part II and once again those fans are going to be enthralled.

Part II picks up exactly where the original film left off. The subsequent fire, thanks to the finale of Part 1, sees Evelyn Abbott (Blunt) and her kids, Regan (Millicent Simmonds – Wonderstruck) and Marcus (Noah Jupe – Honey Boy), seeking shelter elsewhere while the creatures still hunt them down whenever they make a noise.

They soon find shelter in an old mill alongside family friend, Emmett (Cillian Murphy – Inception), but when Regan finds a radio transmission on her father’s radio she becomes insistent that the group travel to where the feed is being transmitted from. She soon makes it known that if the others don’t follow her she is willing to go it alone.

It becomes very obvious early on with Part II that as a filmmaker Krasinki wanted to makes this film bigger and better than the original but without losing that ‘indie’ feel that was so obvious in the first film – and to his credit he manages to do that. The opening sequence which is a short prequel to the event is mind-blowing – brilliantly directed and still has a small town feel to it which makes it perfect fodder for those that love shows like Stranger Things.

From there though the film returns to the almost slower pace that made the first film so special. The film focuses on characterisation whether it be the audience being frustrated at behaviour of Marcus that often puts his family at risk or the emotional growth that we see from Regan this time around. The fact that the people behind the camera also had the sense to risk a large portion of this film being carried by young Millicent Simmonds pays off as well.

Simmonds is brilliant in this film and often steals scenes from her more experienced co-stars like Emily Blunt. She uses her deafness to her advantage in her portrayal of her character on screen and some of the film’s most important and memorable moments are played out with her alongside Cillian Murphy. Both Murphy and Simmonds are also made look even better by Krasinski and his cinematographer, Polly Morgan (Lucy In The Sky), who frequently give small nods to cult classics like Alien throughout the film.

The real key to A Quiet Place Part II working so well as a film though is the fact that Krasinski never allows this film to give in to the cheesiness that Hollywood so often feels like these films need. There are no tacky, throw-away lines placed into the film to try and get a cheap life and there are certainly none of those laughable jump scares that seem to litter horror and sci-fi films these days. It is obvious that Krasinski has learnt his craft by watching the films of the masters – directors like Spielberg, Carpenter and Scott, and thankfully for fans of the genre their work is mirrored in his.The Quiet Place Part II is better suited to those that have already seen the original film. While the flashback at the start of the film does do enough to give newcomers a bit of back-story once the film comes back to the current day there are things that happen that would only be understood by those who have seen the original. The great news is that for fans of the original this is a more than worthy watch and it reveals Millicent Simmonds as a future star in a role that is now truly memorable.

Dave’s rating Out Of 5

Kyle McGrath’s A Quiet Place Part II Review:

A Quiet Place was the 2018 surprise hit film directed by John Krasinski and starring himself and real world wife Emily Blunt as Lee & Evelyn Abbott, parents to Regan and Marcus played by Millicent Simmonds and Noah Jupe. Largely set a year and a half after strange brutal monsters have wiped out most of humanity by attacking anything which makes a sound. The film followed the Abbotts as they try to make a literal quiet life for themselves on their farm in this new world of terror as they expect the birth of a new child. One day a series of events lead to the family being stalked by at least one of these creatures (there are 3 in the area), during which Evelyn gives birth, Lee is killed and Regan, a deaf teenager, discovers that the hearing aid her father made for her while it doesnt help her hearing emits such a frequency that weakens the monsters impervious shell allowing for the family to finally take down the creature with aide of a shotgun. The film ends with a cliffhanger as 2 more monsters race to investigate the explosive sound.

A Quiet Place part 2 picks up directly after these events,  besides a flashback, where Evelyn, her 2 children and newborn infant are forced to flee their farm in search of aide and a new place to call home. They quickly come into contact with Emmett (Cillian Murphy) a neighbour with his own tragic story and former friend of the Abbotts in the old world. Upon hearing a radio broadcast the survivors set out to see if they can reach the source and if with Regan’s earpiece they might be able to honour her father Lee by providing some sort of larger scale fight back against these, until now, seemingly unbeatable monsters.

A Quiet Place was a movie that i personally didnt enjoy nearly as much as many others did. I found it to be a film with quite an interesting premise and being set in a world where characters had to remain as silent as possible I was really interested to see how it played out. Unfortunately while the movie featured a talented cast of actors, impressive special effects and effective jump scares the writing and world building I found somewhat lacking & hurt the believability of the film.

The thing which bothered me most watching the movie was that while I found John Krasinski had done an amazing job in taking a horror story of such an odd nature with little to no spoken dialogue and making it work extremely well, the film by its very nature almost encouraged the audience to think “why dont they do this, why dont they do that”. Some of this second guessing is inevitable with a genre film such as this but here was a movie with great actors, looked amazing and incredibly was never boring despite such long and silent moments when one could argue not much was happening. However I have to assume that most of the audience would like me be thinking about what they would find themselves doing in a situation such as the Abbotts found themselves in and this is just sitting in the audience for 90 minutes, rhe Abbotts have been living in this world for a year and a half and we see the story opens with the death of one of their children. If we the audience can think “maybe they should be living near that waterfall which provides cover for sound” maybe the Abbotts should have thought of these things as well. If I would carry around an egg timer or, hell, even a rock just to throw to the side to privide some sort of distraction for these blind creatures who hunt by sound maybe Lee Abbott should be as well.

It was an interesting movie and I was impressed that it made for such a unique cinema going experience where the audience feels the need to keep as quiet as possible like say a deep sea movie would encourage us to hold our breath. Some parts of the film I quite liked such as the family having a deaf daughter and knowing sign language, rather than this being a ridiculous coincidence I saw it as a reason that the Abbotts have survived so long, they already knew how to communicate with each other silently. But as the plot contrivances and holes began to pile up I couldn’t find ways to explain them all away.

A Quiet Place 2 however I found to be a different case. A lot more is happening here with much of the film surprisingly not focusing as much on Emily Blunt’s character but on Regan and Emmett as they go on a quest of there own to reach what they hope will be a settlement and more survivors. The question is would they be people worth saving.

Despite the original film’s cliche’d “she cocks the shotgun and it cuts to credits” apparent sequel bait ending I can 100% believe that John Krasinski is being honest when saying that they never intended to make a sequel. Reason being is remember those 2 monsters that were racing to destroy whatever had made that shotgun blast? Well they both disappeared from existence which makes watching this movie as some sort of double feature quite humorous indeed as an immediate threat is set up only to be instantly forgotten about. Having the remaining Abbotts quickly dispatch 2 monsters in the film’s opening when a single creature had stalked them the entire previous movie may have nerfed the central threat of the series a little but still Kathy Bates’ character from Misery would be pissed at such inconsistency.

A lot of this movie is put on the shoulders of both Cillian Murphy and especially Millicent Simmonds. Simmonds as Regan trying to do what her father would have done and Murphy as Emmett a man who has lost everything, including possibly his mind, needing to protect his dead friend’s daughter both provided incredible performances which more than carry the film. Cillian Murphy is one of the most talented actors of his generation and fits well into his role giving us a character we’re not sure if we can trust or not.

Emily Blunt somewhat falls to the side in this film which is a pity but while the last film’s theme of protecting one’s children suited her having a much more substantial role, this film’s theme of children growing up and leaving the nest means it wouldnt have worked here. On that note in fact I was somewhat disappointed that the character of Marcus and Evelyn’s roles in the latter half of the film had been exchanced. Not to give anything away but this movie features a scene that makes the previous films stepping on a nail look preferable. The result is that Marcus is forced to stay mostly in one location taking care of a newborn while Evelyn goes in search of medical supplies. I couldnt help but think both their actions could have been swapped around with Evelyn being in the unfavorable position of having both her son and daughter out in the wild with her unable to do anything to help them. Especially considering that Marcus’ character arc in this film, not to mention the whole “leaving the nest” theme, would have fit better had he been the one forced by circumstances to be the protector rather than the one being protected.

The film has plenty more going on in it this time than in the last film. The characters moving from one location to another rather than the entire film being set in one fortified location also avoids the issues I had with world building in the previous movie. The characters act in a more believable way as they are thrust into dangerous situatuons that occur naturally rather than preventable situations they should have prepared for.

As the narratives split to 3 different focal points throughout the story it must be said that a credible job is done to seemlessly jump from one storyline to another without awkwardness or lapses in tone. As tension builds with Marcus exploring his surroundings and not knowing what he will find or what will jump out at him it also is gearing up with Regan and Emmett on their quest.

Once again the movie makes for an incredibly tense cinema going experience. It really goes to show Krasinski’s ability as a director that he can have 100s of people sitting in a room deathly silent on the edge of their seats too afraid to be the one to disturb the quiet by crinkling a bag of crisps and woe betide anyone who forgot to put their phones on silent as they’ll earn the scorn of an entire cinema moreso than usual.

Rarely do I find myself enjoying a sequel as much or more than the original and even more rarely do I find myself such a fan of a sequel to a film I didnt really care for. A Quiet Place Part 2 like Happy Death Day 2U is one of those freak occurrences. I was surprised when this movie got pushed so far forward from its initial 2020 release date with no question of an on demand release. However with its small and talented cast directed with an impressive eye for tension and jump scares this is a genre film the likes of which deserves to be seen on the big screen as much as any huge blockbuster. The interesting premise of the original film is still going strong here and I’m interested to see where the franchise could go from here.

Kyle’s rating Out Of 5:

Lee Griffiths’s A Quiet Place Part II Review:

Lee’s rating Out Of 5:

Average Subculture Rating:

IMDB Rating:

A Quiet Place Part II (2020) on IMDb

Other Subculture A Quiet Place Part II Reviews:

Nil.

Trailer:

Summary: Two women face off as a deadly game called The Hunt goes completly off track.

Year: 2020

Australian Cinema Release Date: TBA

Thailand Cinema Release Date: 12th August 2020

Australian VOD Release Date: 9th April 2020

Country: USA

Director: Craig Zobel

Screenwriter: Nick Cuse, Damon Lindelof

Cast: Hannah Alline (Flight Attendant/Not Stewardess/Kelly), Usmine Ally (Crisis Mike), Alexander Babara (Bojan), Walter Babington (Bandana Man), Ike Barinholtz (Staten Island), Christopher Berry (Target), Reed Birney (Pop), Macon Blair (Fauxnvoy), Steve Coulter (The Doctor), Sylvia Grace Crim (Dead Sexy), Wayne Duvall (Don), Ariel Eliaz (Dino), Betty Gilpin (Crystal), Glenn Howerton (Richard), Jason Kirkpatrick (Rannnndeeee), Jim Klock (Captain O’Hara), J.C. MacKenzie (Paul), Amy Madigan (Ma), Steve Mokate (Sgt. Dale), Kate Nowlin (Big Red), Vince Pisani (Peter), Emma Roberts (Yoga Pants), Sturgill Simpson (Vanilla Nice), Charlie Slaughter (Young Crystal), Ethan Suplee ((Shut The F**k Up) Gary), Hilary Swank (Athena), Dean J. West (Martin), Teri Wyble (Liberty), Tadasay Young (Nicole)

Running Time: 90 mins

Classification: MA15+ (Australia), 18 (Thailand)

 

 

OUR THE HUNT MONSTER REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

Dave Griffiths’ The Hunt Review:

In a year where people have learnt to embrace films in ways that they haven’t previously the one genre that seems to have topped all others has been the horror genre. While The Wretched topped the US Box Office just before the lockdown Leigh Whannell’s The Invisible Man found itself scoring five star reviews from some of the world’s top film journalists.

While those two results seemed to surprise fans of the genre the film they were eagerly anticipating was director Craig Zobel’s (Compliance) The Hunt. The excitement around the release was hardly surprising – Zobel’s post-apocalyptic thriller Z For Zachariah is one of the most under-rated films of the last decade while The Hunt was the latest film to come out of Blumhouse stable, a production company who rarely produce a dud.

The film itself is basically an adult version of The Hunger Games with some extra quirk thrown in for good measure. The opening scenes of The Hunt pretty much The Hunger Games but do quickly establish that characters like Crystal (Betty Gilpin – Stuber) are involved in a deadly game that has been set up by the mysterious Athena (Hilary Swank – Million Dollar Baby) But what exactly is the game that Crystal has found herself in? And why the hell has Athena set something up some vicious and cruel?

Those are the questions that the audience are asked to explore, but to be honest the road to getting those answers is un-original and at times plain boring. While the screenwriting team of Nick Cuse (Watchmen) and Damon Lindelof (Lost) try to give the film its own originality with some quirky Kevin Smith style black humour it does nothing to lift any interest in the film’s plot at all.

While the idea of losing characters on mass and at a whim throughout the early stages of the film may have made the script look like a horror film with a difference it just doesn’t work on the screen. Introducing characters and then having them killed or disappearing straight away makes it nearly impossible for the audience to get a vested interest in the film. It is also does nothing but waste the talents of quality performers like Emma Roberts (We’re The Millers).

While the film does gain a little bit of traction when it becomes a battle between Crystal and Athena even that comes to a crashing end with a lacklustre finale that any decent horror fan will have seen close a film a million times previously. To be honest that little battle royale comes a little bit too late for the interest of the audience as well. The film’s inability to engage its audience early on really does mean that you never really care for Crystal the way you should and again there are a lot of scenes throughout the film that are just too similar to other recent films like Peppermint.

The only winner out of this film is the star Betty Gilpin. While everyone falls around her her performance as Crystal is enough to at times back you forget the clichés that is holding the film back. She brilliantly delivers whatever is thrown at her – action, gore and black comedy. Her scenes with Hillary Swank are at times the only things making the film watchable and for that Gilpin deserves a lot of credit.

The Hunt never really lives up to the hype that came before it. Fans of genuine horror will give it a wide berth after just one viewing while it’s quirkiness and gore is probably enough to put off the casual cinema goer. If you’re looking for a decent gorey, catch-me-if-you-can horror then bypass The Hunt and try to find a way to watch Tony D’Aquino’s The Furies instead.

 

The Hunt is rated 18. It is available on a number of streaming services and will open in select Thai cinemas on August 12th.

 

 

 

 

 

Average Subculture Rating:

 

 

IMDB Rating:

The Hunt (2020) on IMDb

Other Subculture Entertainment The Hunt Reviews:

Nil.

 

Trailer:

 

Summary: American security guard Richard Jewell saves thousands of lives from an exploding bomb at the 1996 Olympics, but is vilified by journalists and the press who falsely reported that he was a terrorist.

Year: 2019

Australian Cinema Release Date: 13th February 2020

Thailand Cinema Release Date: TBA

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: United States

Director: Clint Eastwood

Screenwriter: Billy Ray, Marie Brenner (article), Kent Alexander (book), Kevin Salwen (book)

Cast: Muhammed Ali (himself – archive footage), Ronnie Allen (Kenny Rogers), David An (Ken), Nina Arianda (Nadya Light), Matthew Atchley (FBI Agent Doug Wall), John Atwood (Mr Brenner), Kathy Bates (Bobi Jewell), Jonathan Bergman (Jerrod Braden), Kellan Boyle (Lonny), Brian Brightman (Zoeller), Tom Brokaw (himself – archive footage), Bill Clinton (himself – archive footage), Alex Collins (Max Green – APD), David de Vries (John Walter), Wayne Duvall (Richard Rackleff), Luke Georgecink (Rob), Ian Gomez (Dan Bennet), Will Gonzalez (Agent Rosario), Charles Green (Dr. W. Ray Cleere), Garon Grigsby (Bryant Gumbel), Jon Hamm (Tom Shaw), Paul Walter Hauser (Richard Jewell), Alan Heckner (Bill Miller – GBI), Izzy Herbert (Mariah Braden), Dylan Kussman (Bruce Hughes), Kelly Collins Lintz (Mrs. Braden), Eric Mendenhall (Eric Rudolph), Niko Nicotera (Dave Dutchess), Michael Otis (Mr. Braden), Desmond Phillips (Mike Silver – APD), Mike Pniewski (Brandon Walker), Grant Roberts (Will Jones – APD), Sam Rockwell (Watson Bryant), David Shae (Ron Martz), Billy Slaughter (Tim Barker),Aaron Strand (Joe Nobody), Robert Treveiler (Patrick Williams),  Olivia Wilde (Kathy Scruggs), Mike Wilson (Forsythe), Olaolu Winfunke (Eli Gradestone)

Running Time: 131 mins

Classification: M (Australia)

 

 

OUR RICHARD JEWELL REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

Dave Griffiths Review

Richard Jewell! It should have been a simple true crime story but somewhere in this crazy universe that we call modern times it became one of the most controversial films of 2019. From journalists questioning the validity of the story surrounding the films main protagonist through to director Clint Eastwood’s political alignment being brought into the arguments against the movie; it seemed everybody had an opinion on the film before it even hit cinema screens.

The result was some people staunchly taking a stance against the film while many others had their curiosity peaked and went to see it in order to discover which side of the argument was on the ball. Whatever the reasons were behind people going to see Richard Jewell the end game was they saw one of the most powerful films of the year – a film that once again reminded us why Eastwood is one of the best directors in modern cinema.

Here Eastwood teams up with Oscar nominated screenwriter Billy Ray to tell the story of Richard Jewell a man who discovered that one newspaper article can turn from hero to villain in just a few paragraphs. Jewell (played by Paul Walter Hauser) was an over-ambitious security working at the 1996 Atlanta Olympics. While on duty one night at an Olympic concert he discovered a suspicious bag and quickly identified it as a bomb. Before the bomb could be disarmed it exploded killing some of the nearby concert goers while injuring many others.

At first Jewell was labelled hero – a man whose actions saved the lives of many of the people that had already been evacuated. That all changed a few days later though when journalist Kathy Scruggs (Olivia Wilde) published a story leaking the information that Jewell was the FBI’s main suspect. The result was a media circus and flurry of hatred aimed Jewell and his distressed mother (Kathy Bates) while the only person willing to defend them and their rights was under-prepared lawyer Watson Bryant (Sam Rockwell).

Over the past few years Eastwood has perfected a film-making style that sees him bring a sense of realism to the screen that at times makes the audience feel like they are watching a documentary. While with The 15:17 To Paris he used real soldiers rather than actors with Richard Jewell Eastwood enhances the suspense of Ray’s script to the point where you soon find yourself wondering whether or not Jewell is guilty or innocent despite having seen the night play out for us.

Eastwood allows the film to explore every aspect of the story at hand. He shows us why Jewell became a person of interest for the FBI while also showing us the desperation that led to Scruggs breaking the story in the first place. More importantly Eastwood also bears all about Jewell himself even revealing things like the fact that Jewell while working as a college security guard illegally pulling over speeding drivers while ‘posing’ as a Police Officer. To say this is a warts and all portrayal of all the characters involved is an understatement.

Suspense aside what lifts Richard Jewell to the highest echelon of modern day cinema are the performances of its cast. Every scene between Hauser and Rockwell is sheer brilliance. Rockwell matches his stunning performances in classic films like The Way Way Back and Moon and again shows why he is an under-rated great. But here even he is over-shadowed by the performances of Hauser and Bates whose portrayals of people pushed to the emotional limit is at times harrowing to watch.

The true power of Richard Jewell though is the fact that this is one movie that leaves you never being able to look at the media in the same light again. While people may have been critical of the film being made they miss the point that Eatwood and Ray are trying to make as filmmakers – always try to find out the truth about what you are watching. Richard Jewell is a modern day, suspenseful thriller that will stay with the viewer for a long time to come.

 

 

 

 

Kyle McGrath’s Review

 

 

 

Average Subculture Rating:

 

 

 

IMDB Rating: 
Richard Jewell (2019) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment Richard Jewell Reviews: N/A

Trailer:

Home Run Showdown

Summary: Two little league teams take on their coaches sibling rivalry, and end up doing battle in a place the baseball world never expected it: in the outfield of the Home Run Derby.

Year: 2013

Australian Cinema Release Date: 23rd May, 2013

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA

Director: Oz Scott

Screenwriter: John Bella, Tim Cavanaugh

Cast: Brandon Balog (Tanker), Barry Bostwick (Big Al), Derek Brandon (Ryan), Dean Cain (Rico), Darren Daulton (Harrington), Wayne Duvall (Simpson), Carlos Faison (Coach Jeff), Annabeth Gish (Michelle), Jesse Harper (Sal), Emma-Lee Hess (Fassi), Kyle Kirk (Lori), Stephanie Koenig (Aunt Joey Moore), Matthew Lillard (Joey), Jordan March (Bobby DeLuca), Harold Martin (himself), Kaleigh Ryan (Felicia Lee), Joshua Saba (Dave), Cristina V. Sasso (Coach Joules), Gary Sheffield (Gonzo), Connor Wise (Carter Ford), Dimitri Young (Tank Turpino)

Runtime: 90 mins

Classification:PG

SUBCULTURE MEDIA/THE GOOD THE BAD THE UGLY FILM SHOW REVIEWS/RATINGS OF ‘HOME RUN SHOWDOWN’:

There are no reviews available for this title.

IMDB Rating:Home Run Showdown (2012) on IMDb

Trailer: 

Lincoln

Summary: Steven Spielberg directs two-time Academy Award® winner Daniel Day-Lewis in LINCOLN, a revealing drama that focuses on the 16th President’s tumultuous final months in office. In a nation divided by war and the strong winds of change, Lincoln pursues a course of action designed to end the war, unite the country and abolish slavery. With the moral courage and fierce determination to succeed, his choices during this critical moment will change the fate of generations to come.

Year: 2013

Australian Cinema Release Date: 31st January, 2013

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA

Director: Steven Spielberg

Screenwriter: Tony Kushner, Doris Kearns Goodwin (book)

Cast: Don Henderson Baker (Walter Appleton), Jim Batchelder (Howard Guillefoyle), Thomas K. Belgrey (Arthur Bentleigh), John Bellemer (Faust), Christopher Boyer (General Robert E. Lee), Leon Addison Brown (Harold Green), Bill Camp (Mr. Jolly), Joseph Carlson (Jospeh Marstern), Christopher Cartmill (Leonard Grover), David Costabile (James Ashley), Joseph Cross (John Hay), Daniel Day-Lewis (Abraham Lincoln), Joe Dellinger (Nelson Merrick), Colman Domingo (Private Harold Green), Adam Driver (Samuel Beckwith), Mary Dunleavy (Marguerite), Wayne Duvall (Senator Bluff Wade), Ralph D. Edlow (Leo), Chase Edmunds (Willie Lincoln), James ‘Ike’ Eichling (William Dennison), Sally Field (Mary Todd Lincoln), Ford Flannagan (Tom Pendel), Todd Fletcher (Walter H. Washburn), Walton Goggins (Clay Hawkins), Michael Goodwin (Chilton A. Elliott), Joseph Gordon-Levitt (Robert Lincoln), Dave Hager (Captain Nathan Saunders), Jackie Early Haley (Alexander Stephens), Jared Harris (Ulysses S. Grant), John Hawkes (Robert Latham), Stephen Henderson (William Slade), Grainger Hines (Gideon Welles), Hal Holbrook (Preston Blair), Jamie Horton (Giles Stuart), Gregory Hosaflook (John F. McKenzie), John Hutton (Senator Charles Summer), Gregory Itzen (Judge John A. Campbell), Byron Jennings (Montgomery Blair), Ted Johnson (John Ellis), Tommy Lee Jones (Thaddeus Stevens), William Kaffenberger (John A. Casson), Michael Stanton Kennedy (Hiram Price), Joe Kerkes (Andrew E. Finck), Clarence Key (Brigadier General Seth Williams), Charles Kinney (Myer Strauss), Ken Lambert (Augustus Benjamin), John Lescault (Gustavus Fox), C. Brandon Marshall (Rufus Warren), Elizabeth Marvel (Mrs. Jolly), Dakin Matthews (John Usher), Edward McDonald (Daniel G. Stuart), Bruce McGill (Edwin Stanton), Boris McGiver (Alexander Coffroth), Gulliver McGrath (Tad Lincoln), Gannon McHale (Aaron Haddam), Peter McRobbie (George Pendleton), S. Epatha Merkerson (Lydia Smith), John Moon (Edwin LeClerk), Tim Blake Nelson (Richard Schell), Kevin Lawrence O’Donnell (Charles Hanson), David Oyelowo (Corporal Ira Clark), Matthew Pabo (Lee Pace (Fernando Wood), Robert Peters (Jacob Graylor), Bill Raymond (Schuyler Colfax), Gloria Reuben (Elizabeth Keckley), Michael Ruff (Harold Hollister), Robert Ruffin (Major Thompson Eckert), Raynor Scheine (Josiah S. ‘Beanpole’ Burton), Drew Sease (David Homer Bates), Robert Shepherd (Dr. Joseph K. Barnes),  Michael Shiflett (Senator R.M.T. Hunter), Walt Smith (William Fessenden), James Spader (W.N. Bilbo), Stephen Spinella (Asa Vintner Lettor), David Straithairn (William Seward), Jeremy Strong (John Nicolay), Michael Stuhlbarg (George Yeaman), Richard Topol (James Speed), Asa-Luke Twocrow (Ely Parker), Larry Van Hoose (Avon Hanready), Richard Warner (Homer Benson), David Warshofsky (William Hutton), Christopher Evan Welch (Edward McPherson), Armistead Wellford (Nehemiah Cleary), Charmaine White (Minerva), Julie White (Elizabeth Blair Lee), Scott Wichman (Charles Benjamin)

Runtime: 153 mins

Classification:M

Dave Griffiths’s ‘Lincoln’ Review: 

Director Steven Spielberg (War Horse, The Adventures Of Tintin) is not normally known for his dialogue filled dramas, sure he loves to incorporate themes into his films but normally those films are also full of well-shot action sequences. But ‘Lincoln’ is a little different, ‘Lincoln’ sees Spielberg delve into a historic dialogue driven film that may be enjoyable to watch but certainly could have used a little bit more action.

Taken from a novel by Doris Kearns Goodwin ‘Lincoln’ sees President Abraham Lincoln (Daniel Day-Lewis – Nine, There Will Be Blood) ruling over a country that is self-destructing amidst a horrendous Civil War. Determined to see the Way bring some good to the country Lincoln decides that it is time to change the 13th Amendment and see slavery abolished.

But in order to do that Lincoln has to go against the suggestions of his right-hand man, William Seaward (David Strathairn – The Bourne Legacy, No God No Master) and begin to lobby other congress members (such as Clay Hawkins (Walton Goggins – Officer Down, Django Unchained)) so they will change their stance on slavery in The South.

Aside from that Lincoln also faces crisis on the family front with his wife Mary Todd Lincoln (Sally Field – The Amazing Spider-Man, TV’S Brothers & Sisters) struggling mentally after the loss of their child and his eldest son Robert Lincoln (Joseph Gordon-Levitt – Looper, The Dark Knight Rises) determined to be able to fight in the Way even if it means going against his father’s wishes.

The fact that Spielberg has gone for a full dialogue and drama onslaught does have it pros and cons. While it gives actor Daniel Day-Lewis the opportunity to pull off one of Hollywood’s best ever performances it also holds back the film. It becomes painfully obvious that screenwriter Tony Kushner comes from a theatre background when you realise that despite the film is set during the Civil War you hear more actors talking about the war then what you see of footage from it… it’s almost like Kushner has forgotten that in film it is okay to spend a little bit of cash and actually film something rather than just talk about.

Spielberg seems to also surprisingly under use some of his cast members. While Walton Goggins gets to showcase the acting ability that made him such a big hit on ‘The Shield’ and Tommy Lee Jones puts in one of his finest efforts for years, poor Joseph Gordon-Levitt is horribly under used for an actor of his talents while Sally Field is horribly miscast as Mary Todd Lincoln.

If you enjoy historically accurate dramatic films then you will enjoy ‘Lincoln’ but if you enjoy films with a little bit of action then this certainly isn’t the film for you.

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘Lincoln′: Check Episode #19 of our The Good The Bad The Ugly Podcast for a more in-depth review of ‘Lincoln’. Dave’s other review of ‘Lincoln’ can be found on the Helium Entertainment Channel

Rating: 3/5

IMDB Rating:Lincoln (2012) on IMDb