Tagged: Bill Camp

Jason Bourne

Summary: Jason Bourne, now remembering who he truly is, tries to uncover hidden truths about his past.

Year: 2016

Australian Cinema Release Date: 28th July 2016

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA

Director: Paul Greengrass

Screenwriter: Paul Greengrass, Christopher Rouse, Robert Ludlam (characters)

Cast: Riz Ahmed (Aaron Kalloor), Bill Camp (Malcolm Smith), Vincent Cassel (Asset), Johnny Cicco (Bradley Samuels), Matt Damon (Jason Bourne), Ata Essandoh (Craig Jeffers), Ellie Fox (Officer Jones), Gregg Henry (Richard Webb), Tommy Lee Jones (CIA Director Robert Dewey), Vinzenz Kiefer (Christian Dassault), Stephen Kunken (Baumen), Scott Shepherd (Director NI Edwin Russell), Julia Stiles (Nicky Parsons), Alicia Vikander (Heather Lee)

Runtime: 123 mins

Classification: M

 

OUR JASON BOURNE REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

David Griffiths:

It’s the film that hardcore Jason Bourne fans thought they would never see but yes Jason Bourne is back on the big screen. After ‘The Bourne Ultimatum’ Matt Damon was quoted a number of times that he would never play the role again, even Universal seemed sure of it as they reworked the franchise with a new character that was given to Jeremy Renner to play. But it seems when you listen to a quote, listen to it properly because what Damon said was that he would never do another Bourne film unless Paul Greengrass (‘Captain Phillips’) was in the director’s chair. When Greengrass is back and so is Damon!!!

The film begins with Jason Bourne (Matt Damon – ‘Good Will Hunting’) staying out of sight in Europe and surviving on the money that he makes as he goes around competing in various underground fighting tournaments. He is forced out of hiding though when his former ally Nicky Parsons (Julia Stiles – ‘Save The Last Dance’) hacks into the CIA’s computer network and makes some alarming discoveries about the real identity behind Jason Bourne and how his father was involved.

The hack alerts young CIA agent Heather Lee (Alicia Vikander – Ex-Machina) to what is happening and soon she finds herself working with CIA Director Robert Dewey (Tommy Lee Jones – ‘Men In Black’) to bring Bourne in. Together they bring in a brutal agent named only as Asset (Vincent Cassel – ‘Black Swan’) to put Bourne down while also trying to work out how to best deal with Social Media empire boss Aaron Kalloor (Riz Ahmed – ‘Nightcrawler’) who is threatening to expose the relationship between his social media platform and the CIA.

There is little doubt that Paul Greengrass’ latest entry into the Bourne franchise is pretty sleek but how does it hold up in the modern film environment? To be brutally honest I’ve never really seen Bourne as an elite franchise. While yes the films always look and they have shown that Matt Damon is a more than capable action star, they just don’t do enough to make themselves ‘different’ enough to really impress me. While franchises like ‘Fast & The Furious’ do whatever they can to make each film bigger and better the ‘Bourne’ franchise seems to just chug along doing the same thing each time, without doing much to change the formula along the way.

One of my criticisms levelled at this franchise in the past has been the fact that these films ride a dangerous path. The plots are never intense enough to make you marvel at the screenwriting while the action sequences are normally nothing any different to what we have seen before. Here it is obvious that they have tried to overcome these issues as the screenplay does have a bit more ‘meat’ to it while the car chase through Las Vegas resembles something of a sequence that may stick in some cinema goers minds for at least a few weeks… even though it still isn’t something as spectacular as dropping a car from a plane or jumping cars between high rise in Dubai.

What truly is remarkable here though is Greengrass’ attempt to re-capture the riots that have plagued Greece over the past few years. These sequences are absolutely brilliant and work amazingly well as a back-drop as Asset works feverishly to hunt down Parsons and Bourne. It is with sequences like these that Greengrass comes to the fore, and here he recaptures the same type of suspense that he wowed audiences with throughout ‘Captain Phillips.’ In a lot of ways these scenes are a lot better than the clichéd car chase that serves as a finale here and it will be the main thing that sticks in mind for a while to come.

We do see a vast improvement in the screenplay here as well. While characters like Asset may still be a walking cliché the sub-plot that looks at the CIA being in bed with a social media platform does raise questions such as ‘should the Government spy on us in order to keep us safe?’ while the screenplay also paints a very murky picture to what the audience should expect from Heather Lee. So often action films like this feel the need to show the audience who is good and who is bad without any grey at all. But with Lee the audience is left constantly wondering where her alliance sits. Is the just another lapdog for Dewey or does she have a soft spot for Bourne? It’s actually a relief to find a character in this genre that has the audience constantly questioning their thoughts on said character… and Bourne’s reaction to her at the end is what makes this film’s finale work despite the disappointment of the car chase.

Being written that way makes Heather a dream for a young actress to play and here Alicia Vikander doesn’t disappoint. She really is one of those actresses that just seems to shine no matter what role is thrown at her. Her recent performances in ‘Testament Of Youth’ and ‘The Danish Girl’ show what she is capable of in brilliant films, while here she follows what is written for and plays Heather as a cold, almost emotionless agent who never lets her true feelings known to anyone. While she’s not exactly working with a great script she certainly makes something of it. To her credit she holds her own as she acts alongside Tommy Lee Jones who just breezes through as the ‘bad guy’ while Matt Damon once again shows that he can still hold his own with any action star going around.

While ‘Jason Bourne’ doesn’t exactly set the world on fire or bring anything new to the action genre it is a serviceable film that certainly won’t bore its audience. Greengrass manages to make the film visually attractive but you are left wanting a big action sequence that just never eventuates (‘Star Trek Beyond’ it ain’t), still the film does more than enough to be considered ‘a thinking person’s action film.’
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Adam Ross

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Average Subculture Rating (out of 5):   Stars(3.5)

 

IMDB Rating:  Jason Bourne (2016) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment Jason Bourne reviews: Nil.

 

Trailer:

Midnight Special

Summary: A father named Roy (Michael Shannon) goes on the run with his son, Alton (Jaeden Lieberher), after the boy’s special powers attracts the attention of a cult who believes he delivers messages from God and also the CIA.

Year: 2016

Australian Cinema Release Date: 21st April 2016

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: United States

Director: Jeff Nichols

Screenwriter: Jeff Nichols

Cast: Lynn Berry (herself), Sean Bridgers (Fredrick), Kerry Cahill (Linda), Bill Camp (Doak), Adam Driver (Sevier), Kirsten Dunst (Sarah Tomlin), Joel Edgerton (Lucas), Lucy Faust (Caroline), Sharon Garrison (Jane Adams), Dana Gourrier (Sharon Davison), Nancy Grace (herself), Scott Haze (Levi), David Jensen (Elden), Allison King (Hannah), Sharon Landry (Merrianne), Jaeden Lieberher (Alton Meyer), Michael Shannon (Roy), Sam Shepard (Calvin Meyer), Paul Sparks (Agent Miller)

Runtime: 112 mins

Classification: M

 

OUR MIDNIGHT SPECIAL REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

David Griffiths:

Jeff Nichols has really announced himself as one of the best modern day filmmakers over the past few years. To be honest Nichols is yet to make a bad film, and his features which have included Shotgun Stories, Take Shelter and Mud have been gems that have regularly made my Top Ten films lists of the years they were released. Hell, I would go as far as to say that Mud is right up there as one of the best modern day films made. For that reason alone when I heard that his new film, Midnight Special, was a dark edged sci-fi that just happened to star two of my favourite actors, Michael Shannon and Joel Edgerton, I was just as excited as I was about the release of Captain America: Civil War or Batman vs Superman.

Midnight Special begins with Roy (Michael Shannon – Man Of Steel) on the run from the law after he and his childhood friend Lucas (Joel Edgerton – The Gift) snatched his son Alton (Jaeden Lieberher – St. Vincent) from a cult where it is expected that Alton and his supernatural gifts will continue to be the cult’s bridge between themselves and God.

But as Roy and Lucas rush to get Alton first of all to his mother, Sarah (Kirsten Dunst – Melancholia), and then to the co-ordinates that he has been sent, the journey is made dangerous by the fact that they are pursued by henchmen sent by cult leader, Calvin Meyer (Sam Shepherd – Mud) and law enforcement agencies led by Sevier (Adam Driver – Star Wars: The Force Awakens). Then there is the fact that Alton’s supernatural powers seem to be changing all the time, sometimes with catastrophic results.

There is no doubt that Midnight Special is going to frustrate some audience members. The film begins with an amazing opening as Nichols has the courage not to let the audience be able to figure out too much. In fact for the first 20-30 minutes you are led to believe that Alton has been kidnapped and you have absolutely no idea who Lucas is. The film keeps you completely in the dark to key information and that just adds to the suspense as you try to piece everything together like a jigsaw puzzle. That works remarkable well for the beginning of the film but what is annoying is when Nichols decides to do the same thing with the ending the film. There are so many unanswered questions in the end that it almost drives you crazy. In fact there are so many things left open that this is the one time I wouldn’t be angry if they decided to make a sequel to the film just to finish it off.

For the most part though Midnight Special works sensationally well.  The way the film drifts from the cult storyline to a road-thriller shows that Nichols has the maturity to be a filmmaker that doesn’t shy away from throwing all the traditional filmmaking styles right out the window to get his story across. The fact that Nichols also manages to mix tropes from road trip and thriller movies into a film that ends up being a sci-fi also shows why he is one of the most exciting filmmakers of the modern generation.

Nichols’ well written screenplay also allows his cast to shine. As you would expect Edgerton and Shannon at their usual brilliant best while the film also allows Kirsten Dunst to remind audiences that she is still an actress who can really deliver when she is given the right material to work with. The script also lets Adam Driver show those who have been critical since his performance in Star Wars: The Force Awakens just how good he has always been in the indie filmmaking society. But the star here is clearly Jaeden Lieberther who like he did in the Bill Murray film St. Vincent shows the world how is destined to become one of the finest actors Hollywood has ever seen.

Midnight Special is the kind of film that has the potential to frustrate cinema goers who like a simple linear story, but if you like your sci-fi a little left of centre then you are going to adore this film. In fact this is the kind of movie that you’ll go to see and then urge your friends to see because you’ve loved it so much. Sure Midnight Special is not as good as Nichols’ previous films but it is still well worth a look.

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Greg King:

You can hear Greg King’s full Midnight Special review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #173.

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Nick Gardener:

You can hear Nick Gardener’s full Midnight Special review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #173.

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Average Subculture Rating (out of 5):  Stars(3)

 

IMDB Rating: Midnight Special (2016) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment Midnight Special reviews: You can also listen to our full Midnight Special review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #173.

Trailer:

Lincoln

Summary: Steven Spielberg directs two-time Academy Award® winner Daniel Day-Lewis in LINCOLN, a revealing drama that focuses on the 16th President’s tumultuous final months in office. In a nation divided by war and the strong winds of change, Lincoln pursues a course of action designed to end the war, unite the country and abolish slavery. With the moral courage and fierce determination to succeed, his choices during this critical moment will change the fate of generations to come.

Year: 2013

Australian Cinema Release Date: 31st January, 2013

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA

Director: Steven Spielberg

Screenwriter: Tony Kushner, Doris Kearns Goodwin (book)

Cast: Don Henderson Baker (Walter Appleton), Jim Batchelder (Howard Guillefoyle), Thomas K. Belgrey (Arthur Bentleigh), John Bellemer (Faust), Christopher Boyer (General Robert E. Lee), Leon Addison Brown (Harold Green), Bill Camp (Mr. Jolly), Joseph Carlson (Jospeh Marstern), Christopher Cartmill (Leonard Grover), David Costabile (James Ashley), Joseph Cross (John Hay), Daniel Day-Lewis (Abraham Lincoln), Joe Dellinger (Nelson Merrick), Colman Domingo (Private Harold Green), Adam Driver (Samuel Beckwith), Mary Dunleavy (Marguerite), Wayne Duvall (Senator Bluff Wade), Ralph D. Edlow (Leo), Chase Edmunds (Willie Lincoln), James ‘Ike’ Eichling (William Dennison), Sally Field (Mary Todd Lincoln), Ford Flannagan (Tom Pendel), Todd Fletcher (Walter H. Washburn), Walton Goggins (Clay Hawkins), Michael Goodwin (Chilton A. Elliott), Joseph Gordon-Levitt (Robert Lincoln), Dave Hager (Captain Nathan Saunders), Jackie Early Haley (Alexander Stephens), Jared Harris (Ulysses S. Grant), John Hawkes (Robert Latham), Stephen Henderson (William Slade), Grainger Hines (Gideon Welles), Hal Holbrook (Preston Blair), Jamie Horton (Giles Stuart), Gregory Hosaflook (John F. McKenzie), John Hutton (Senator Charles Summer), Gregory Itzen (Judge John A. Campbell), Byron Jennings (Montgomery Blair), Ted Johnson (John Ellis), Tommy Lee Jones (Thaddeus Stevens), William Kaffenberger (John A. Casson), Michael Stanton Kennedy (Hiram Price), Joe Kerkes (Andrew E. Finck), Clarence Key (Brigadier General Seth Williams), Charles Kinney (Myer Strauss), Ken Lambert (Augustus Benjamin), John Lescault (Gustavus Fox), C. Brandon Marshall (Rufus Warren), Elizabeth Marvel (Mrs. Jolly), Dakin Matthews (John Usher), Edward McDonald (Daniel G. Stuart), Bruce McGill (Edwin Stanton), Boris McGiver (Alexander Coffroth), Gulliver McGrath (Tad Lincoln), Gannon McHale (Aaron Haddam), Peter McRobbie (George Pendleton), S. Epatha Merkerson (Lydia Smith), John Moon (Edwin LeClerk), Tim Blake Nelson (Richard Schell), Kevin Lawrence O’Donnell (Charles Hanson), David Oyelowo (Corporal Ira Clark), Matthew Pabo (Lee Pace (Fernando Wood), Robert Peters (Jacob Graylor), Bill Raymond (Schuyler Colfax), Gloria Reuben (Elizabeth Keckley), Michael Ruff (Harold Hollister), Robert Ruffin (Major Thompson Eckert), Raynor Scheine (Josiah S. ‘Beanpole’ Burton), Drew Sease (David Homer Bates), Robert Shepherd (Dr. Joseph K. Barnes),  Michael Shiflett (Senator R.M.T. Hunter), Walt Smith (William Fessenden), James Spader (W.N. Bilbo), Stephen Spinella (Asa Vintner Lettor), David Straithairn (William Seward), Jeremy Strong (John Nicolay), Michael Stuhlbarg (George Yeaman), Richard Topol (James Speed), Asa-Luke Twocrow (Ely Parker), Larry Van Hoose (Avon Hanready), Richard Warner (Homer Benson), David Warshofsky (William Hutton), Christopher Evan Welch (Edward McPherson), Armistead Wellford (Nehemiah Cleary), Charmaine White (Minerva), Julie White (Elizabeth Blair Lee), Scott Wichman (Charles Benjamin)

Runtime: 153 mins

Classification:M

Dave Griffiths’s ‘Lincoln’ Review: 

Director Steven Spielberg (War Horse, The Adventures Of Tintin) is not normally known for his dialogue filled dramas, sure he loves to incorporate themes into his films but normally those films are also full of well-shot action sequences. But ‘Lincoln’ is a little different, ‘Lincoln’ sees Spielberg delve into a historic dialogue driven film that may be enjoyable to watch but certainly could have used a little bit more action.

Taken from a novel by Doris Kearns Goodwin ‘Lincoln’ sees President Abraham Lincoln (Daniel Day-Lewis – Nine, There Will Be Blood) ruling over a country that is self-destructing amidst a horrendous Civil War. Determined to see the Way bring some good to the country Lincoln decides that it is time to change the 13th Amendment and see slavery abolished.

But in order to do that Lincoln has to go against the suggestions of his right-hand man, William Seaward (David Strathairn – The Bourne Legacy, No God No Master) and begin to lobby other congress members (such as Clay Hawkins (Walton Goggins – Officer Down, Django Unchained)) so they will change their stance on slavery in The South.

Aside from that Lincoln also faces crisis on the family front with his wife Mary Todd Lincoln (Sally Field – The Amazing Spider-Man, TV’S Brothers & Sisters) struggling mentally after the loss of their child and his eldest son Robert Lincoln (Joseph Gordon-Levitt – Looper, The Dark Knight Rises) determined to be able to fight in the Way even if it means going against his father’s wishes.

The fact that Spielberg has gone for a full dialogue and drama onslaught does have it pros and cons. While it gives actor Daniel Day-Lewis the opportunity to pull off one of Hollywood’s best ever performances it also holds back the film. It becomes painfully obvious that screenwriter Tony Kushner comes from a theatre background when you realise that despite the film is set during the Civil War you hear more actors talking about the war then what you see of footage from it… it’s almost like Kushner has forgotten that in film it is okay to spend a little bit of cash and actually film something rather than just talk about.

Spielberg seems to also surprisingly under use some of his cast members. While Walton Goggins gets to showcase the acting ability that made him such a big hit on ‘The Shield’ and Tommy Lee Jones puts in one of his finest efforts for years, poor Joseph Gordon-Levitt is horribly under used for an actor of his talents while Sally Field is horribly miscast as Mary Todd Lincoln.

If you enjoy historically accurate dramatic films then you will enjoy ‘Lincoln’ but if you enjoy films with a little bit of action then this certainly isn’t the film for you.

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘Lincoln′: Check Episode #19 of our The Good The Bad The Ugly Podcast for a more in-depth review of ‘Lincoln’. Dave’s other review of ‘Lincoln’ can be found on the Helium Entertainment Channel

Rating: 3/5

IMDB Rating:Lincoln (2012) on IMDb

Compliance

Summary:  On a particularly busy day at a suburban fast food restaurant, high-strung manager Sandra (Ann Dowd) receives a phone call from a police officer reporting that a young employee, Becky (Dreama Walker), has stolen money from a customer. Commencing an investigation, Sandra follows instructions from the policeman no matter how invasive they become. Director Craig Zobel (Great World of Sound) explores a riveting true story in which the line between legality and reason is blurred by the best of intentions. Delving into the complex psychology of real-life events, Zobel shows that truth really is stranger than fiction.

Year: 2013

Australian Cinema Release Date: 17th January, 2013

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA

Director: Craig Zobel

Screenwriter: Craig Zobel

Cast: Michael Abbott Jnr. (Officer Jimmy Palmer), Ashlie Atkinson (Marti), Desmin Borges (Officer Morris), Bill Camp (Van), Ann Dowd (Sandra), Philip Ettinger Kevin), Amelie Fowler (Brie), Pat Healy (Officer Daniels), Nikiya Mathis (Connie), James McCaffrey (Detective Neals), Stephen Payne (Harold), Ralph Rodriguez (Julio), Matt Skibiak (Robert Gilmour), Dreama Walker (Becky)

Runtime: 90 mins

Classification:M

Dave Griffiths’s ‘Compliance’ Review: 

When cinema goers at the Melbourne International Film Festival walk out of a film you know it’s a hardcore watch, after all people that attend a festival like that are serious movie fans not just families cruising in to watch a film while they munch on some popcorn.

The thing about ‘Compliance’ is it might be a confronting watch that won’t be everybody’s cup-of-tea but it is still a well written and brilliantly acted crime drama/thriller that the serious cinema goer is going to be really impressed with.

Based on actual events ‘Compliance’ sees fast food restaurant manager Sandra (Ann Dowd – The Discoverers, Bachelorette) under intense stress. It is a busy Friday night, her restaurant is understaffed and one of her inept staff members left the freezer ajar the night before meaning they are fast running out of ingredients for a lot of their menu.

In the middle of it all Sandra takes a phone call. A call from a man identifying himself as Officer Daniels (Pat Healy – The Innkeepers, When You Find Me) who claims that he is currently investigating a report that a staff member called Becky (Drema Walker – Vamperifica, The Kitchen) has stolen money from a customer. He orders Sandra to conduct a strip-search on her and as the night goes on Daniels also incorporates other staff members including Kevin (Philip Ettinger – Sleepwalk With Me, Brooklyn Brothers Beat The Best) and Marti (Ashlie Atkinson – He’s Way More Famous Than You, TV’S 30 Rock), as well as Sandra’s fiancee Van (Bill Camp – Lincoln, Lawless) into his perverse game. Each person completely obeys Daniels orders and the degrading experience eventually turns into Becky being sexually assaulted.

What makes ‘Compliance’ such a gripping watch is the fact that director/screenwriter Craig Zobel (Great World Of Sound) has done his job extremely well. Both the screenplay and style of the film are so naturalistic that it feels like you are a fly-on-the-wall rather than someone watching a film. To his credit however Zobel never glorifies any of the things that are occurring on the screen

At times the audience may find themselves thinking ‘would anybody really fall for this prank’ or ‘has Zobel exaggerated what really happened’, but perhaps the most scary thing is that the prank at hand was used 70 times in real life and people fell for it each time, you can’t really criticise Zobel when he is just following what really happened.

The naturalistic style of the film also carries over to the performances of the lead actors. Ann Dowd is brilliant as the flustered Sandra while Dreama Walker really announces herself as a young actress with a lot of talent.

However, the actor that really stands out is Pat Healy who gets to be ‘Compliance’s’ bad Guy. He plays the evil ‘Officer Daniels’ with eerie realism and is certainly an actor to watch in the future. ‘Officer Daniels’ is easily one of the evilest characters to ever grace the screen and Pat Healy pulls off the role with ease.

‘Compliance’ is at times a hard watch, but it is also one of the best written films that you are likely to see this year.

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘Compliance′: Check Episode #16 of our The Good The Bad The Ugly Podcast for a more in-depth review of ‘Compliance’. Dave’s other review of ‘Compliance’ can be found on the Helium Entertainment Channel

Rating: 4/5

IMDB Rating: Compliance (2012) on IMDb