Tagged: Juliette Binoche

The Wait

Summary: A mother unexpectedly meets her son’s fiancée at a villa in Sicily and gets to know her as she waits for her son to arrive.

Year: 2015

Australian Cinema Release Date: 30th June 2016

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: Italy, France

Director: Piero Messina

Screenwriter: Giacomo Bendotti, Ilaria Macchia, Andrea Paolo Massara, Piero Messina, Luigi Pirandello (play)

Cast: Giovanni Anzaldo (Giuseppe), Juliette Binoche (Anna), Giorgio Colangeli (Pietro), Lou de Laage (Jeanna), Domenico Diele (Girogio), Antonio Folletto (Paolo), Corinna Locastro (Rosa)

Runtime: 110 mins

Classification: M

 

OUR THE WAIT REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

David Griffiths:

The first thing that hits you about ‘The Wait’ is that it is visually spectacular. The opening scene sees Massina take a leaf out of Australian filmmaker Jim Stamatakos’ playbook as he shows the audience a very visual look of mourners paying respects at Guiseppe’s funeral. This style of filmmaking is continued throughout the film as Massina will suddenly focus on things such as a piece of stitching hanging from a chair, that most other directors would completely miss. As a result some audience members will say that ‘The Wait’ drags along… but I dare to differ.

Massina’s style of filmmaking only makes this film even more suspenseful. As the film goes along the audience will find themselves waiting for Jeanne to pick up on a clue that Guiseppe is dead or eagerly wait for Anna to breakdown and finally bury the charade. At times during the film you even find yourself wondering whether or not Guisippe is dead… is his mother simply trying to hid the fact that he doesn’t want to see Jeanne. There is also the fact that this style of slow , drawn out filmmaking also matches the long, hot days that the characters are enduring.

Aside from the obvious suspense surrounding whether or not Anna will tell Jeanne what has happened or not the audience also find themselves drawn into a number of subplots including one that particularly suspenseful walk through the Italian countryside where you are left wondering whether or not the naive Jeanne is about to be attacked by two men she has just befriended at the lake. In a piece of cinematic brilliance Massina allows the whole thing to play out with looks between the characters and doesn’t rely on dialogue to raise the suspense.

In a lot of ways Massina’s style of filmmaking is very anti-Hollywood. He doesn’t spell everything out for his audience, instead he will have long scenes of no dialogue between the characters as they discover something new or are showing emotion or he’ll let the story move along through voice mails… but in an artistic way. The one thing I never found though was that ‘The Wait’ bored me. No matter how long a silent scene went for Massina’s amazing way he captured the visuals kept me totally intrigued to the screen. Even watching a fire-fighting helicopter pick up water from a lake seems strangely poetic when brought to the audience by Massina and his cinematographer, Francesco Di Giacomo (‘The Eternal City’)

As usual Juliette Binoche shines in an artistic film. She relishes on scenes where she has no dialogue and is forced to let her emotions be shown with looks and expressions… to be honest if you loved her in ‘The Clouds Of Sils Maria’ then you are going to be equally impressed here. She is also well supported by young Lou de Laage who announces herself as an actress that is set to take European cinema by storm. With her beautiful looks and brilliant acting skills… the world is hers.

To me ‘The Wait’ is a beautifully shot Italian film that makes me eagerly await for Piero Messina’s next film. His style his visually impressive and he can tell a story in a way that very few filmmakers can. ‘The Wait’ might be slow at times, but it is certainly far from a disappointment.

 

Stars(4)

 

 

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5):  Stars(4)

 

IMDB Rating:  The Wait (2015) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment The Wait reviews: You can also listen to our full The Wait review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #183.

Trailer:

Clouds Of Sils Maria

Summary: At the peak of her international career, Maria Enders (Binoche) is asked to return to the play that made her career. This time taking on the role of an older woman driven to suicide, rather than the young starlet, the performance within this films performance is reflective of her own life, with a new young starlet moving into the role she once possessed, in both the play and reality.

Year: 2014

Australian Cinema Release Date: 7th May, 2015

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: France, Switzerland, Germany, USA, Belgium

Director: Olivier Assayas

Screenwriter: Olivier Assayas

Cast: Juliette Binoche (Maria Enders), Brady Corbet (Piers Roaldson), Lars Eidinger (Klaus Diesterweg), Johnny Flynn (Christopher Giles), Chloe Grace Moretz (Jo-Ann Ellis), Bene Peverelli (Berndt), Aljoscha Stadelmann (Urs Kobler), Kristen Stewart (Valentine), Angela Winkler (Rosa Melchior), Hanns Zischler (Henryk Wald)

Runtime: 115 mins

Classification: M

 

OUR CLOUDS OF SILS MARIA REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

Greg King:

You can hear Greg’s full Clouds Of Sils Maria review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #128

 

Stars(2.5)

 

 

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5):  Stars(2.5)

 

IMDB Rating: Clouds of Sils Maria (2014) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment Clouds Of Sils Maria reviews: You will also be able to hear our Clouds Of Sils Maria review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #128.

Trailer:

Infinitely Polar Bear

Thanks to Icon Distribution we have some very special giveaways to celebrate the release of Infinitely Polar Bear in cinemas this week

One lucky winner will receive a pass to see Infinitely Polar Bear (starring Mark Ruffalo and Zoe Saldana) in cinemas as well as an Icon Family DVD Pack that contains Dan In Real Life (Steve Carell,  Juliette Binoche), Last Chance Harvey (Dustin Hoffman, Emma Thompson), The Burning Plain (Charlize Theron, Kim Basinger, Jennifer Lawrence, John Corbett) and The Beaver (Mel Gibson, Jodie Foster).

A further nine people win passes to see Infitely Polar Bear in cinemas.

For your chance to win in our Infinitely Polar Bear giveaway simply listen to The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #123 to see how to win.

Godzilla

Summary: The world’s most famous monster is pitted against malevolent creatures who, bolstered by humanity’s scientific arrogance, threaten our very existence.

Year: 2014

Australian Cinema Release Date: 15th May, 2014

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA, Japan

Director: Gareth Edwards

Screenwriter: Max Borenstein, Dave Callaham (story)

Cast: CJ Adams (Young Ford), Juliette Binoche (Sandra Brody), Carson Bolde (Sam Brody), Garry Chalk (Stan Walsh), Bryan Cranston (Joe Brody), Jake Cunanan (Akio), James D. Dever (Captain Freeman), Catherine Lough Haggquist (PO #1 Martinez), Sally Hawkins (Vivienne Graham), Richard T. Jones (Captain Russell Hampton), Hiro Kanagawa (Hayato), Eric Keenleyside (Boyd), Anthony Konechny (Thach), Brian Markinson (Whelan), Gardiner Millar (Fitzgerald), Elizabeth Olsen (Elle Brody), Ty Olsson (Jainway), Victor Rasuk (Sergeant Tre Morales), Patrick Sabongui (Lieutenant Commander Marcus Waltz), Al Sapienza (Huddleston), David Strathairn (Admiral William Stenz), Aaron Taylor-Johnson (Ford Brody), Ken Watanabe (Dr. Ichiro Serizawa), Ken Yamamura (Takashi)

Runtime: 123 mins

Classification: M

OUR GODZILLA REVIEWS & RATINGS:

Adam Ross: You can check out Adam’s Godzilla review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #79

Stars(3)

 

Nick Gardener: You can check out Nick’s Godzilla review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #79

Stars(3)

David Griffiths:

Fans of Godzilla films want and deserve a good Godzilla film, after all the poor suffering souls have nothing but a bad taste in their mouth after the 1998 Matthew Broderick led disaster. Well now comes the 2014 update and on the surface it seems that in a rare oddity Hollywood has finally picked the right director to be at the helm of a major project. Anyone that can remember just how good Monsters was will attest to the fact that Gareth Edwards knows how to make a damn fine ‘monster flick.’

This time around we find Joe Brody (Bryan Cranston – Get A Job, Cold Comes The Night) alarmed at the seismic activity going on around the Japanese nuclear power plant where he works. To his surprise nobody seems to take him seriously and the result is a catastrophe that results in the death of many other workers including his wife.

Flash-forward to fifteen years later and Joe’s son Ford (Aaron Taylor-Johnson – Kick-Ass 2, Anna Karenina) is now a bomb expert in the military. He is also married to emergency room nurse, Elle (Elizabeth Olsen – Oldboy, In Secret) and has a young son that his military service takes him away from far to often. It is therefore understandable that he is frustrated when on a rare time at home he receives a call from Japanese authorities informing him that Joe has been arrested entering into a quarantined zone.

After bailing his father out Ford learns that his father believes that the authorities are keeping something secret inside the ‘zone’ and he wants to get inside to find his old data and to see what is going on. Reluctantly Ford follows his father and soon learns that experts, including Vivienne Graham (Sally Hawkins – The Double, Blue Jasmine) and Dr. Ichiro Serizawa (Ken Watanabe – Unforgiven, Inception) have been keeping a very large secret that is about to unleash itself onto the world.

It is easy to see Edwards’ handy work all over Godzilla. His monster sequences are well worth the price of admission, especially the ‘monster fights’ and at times he isn’t afraid to pull the focus away from these battles to show what the humans such as Ford are doing at that time. However while these sequences do look impressive as a whole Godzilla is held back from becoming a great film because of several reasons.

One of the major flaws of Godzilla is the characterisation. While you hardly go into a ‘monster flick’ expecting an epic back story for each character it is disappointing to find that a lot of the characters here in Godzilla are dangerously one dimensional. For example Dr. Serizawa is one of the more interesting characters although very little is learnt about him, then there is the massive under use of Elle, which results in the crime of seeing an award winning actress like Elizabeth Olsen become little more than scenery as she simple watches monsters go by with her mouth open like a Laughing Clown. The lack of characterization causes a problem later on in the film when the audience begins to realise that they really don’t care whether some characters survive the slaughter or not.

Of course though one of the most important things for a film like Godzilla however is what do the monsters actually look? Well Godzilla himself looks fine, Edwards’ team has actually done a pretty good throw back to the Godzilla of old. The same however cannot be said for the other Kaiju monsters that appear in the film, call me an old-fogey but somehow they seem just a little bit too metallic and robotic like for me. Their look makes them look very fake while on the other hand Godzilla’s natural look makes it almost believable that such creatures do live somewhere out there under the sea.

The decent storyline however does allow some of the actors to show their worth though. Bryan Cranston is given some moments to show his dramatic range, a welcome relief after the teaser footage they showed us a couple of months ago made it look like he might have been going for a comedic portrayal of his character, while Aaron Taylor-Johnson pulls on a serious face and actually shows that he may have what it takes to become an action hero in the future. As previously mentioned though some of the cast – especially Elizabeth Olsen and Ken Watanabe – are completely wasted in their one dimensional roles.

Godzilla is certainly far from a bad film. The good storyline and decent action sequences make it a worthy watch and Gareth Edwards should be congratulated for that, but sadly some elements of the script will still leave some serious film lovers wanting more.

 

Stars(3)

 

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5): Stars(3)

IMDB Rating:  Godzilla (2014) on IMDb

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘Godzilla′: Nil

Trailer:

Summary:Riding across Manhattan in a stretch limo in order to get a haircut, a 28-year-old billionaire asset manager s day devolves into an odyssey with a cast of characters that start to tear his world apart.

Year: 2012

Australian Cinema Release Date: 2nd August, 2012

Australian DVD Release Date: 19th December, 2012

Country: Canada/France/Portugal/Italy

Director: David Cronenberg

Screenwriter: David Cronenberg, David DeLillo (novel)

Cast: Mathieu Amalric (Andre Petrescu), Abdul Ayoola (Ibrahim Hamadou), Bob Bainborough (Dr. Ingram), Jay Baruchel (Shiner), Juliette Binoche (Didi Fancher), Kevin Durand (Torval), Sarah Gadon (Elise Shifrin), Paul Giamatti (Benno Levin), Gouchy Boy (Kosmo Thomas), Emily Hampshire (Jane Melman), K’Naan (Brutha Fez), Zeljiko Kecojevic (Danko), Patricia McKenzie (Kendra Hays), Samantha Morton (Vija Kinsky), Philip Nozuka (Michael Chin), Robert Pattinson (Eric Packer), David Schaap (Arthur Rapp), George Touliatos (Anthony Abubato)

Runtime: 109 mins

Classification:MA15+

Dave Griffiths’s ‘Cosmopolis’ Review:

Here we all were thinking that director David Cronenberg (A Dangerous Method, Eastern Promises) had got all the alternative filmmaking out of his blood stream. Recently his films have been pretty stock standard, but oh boy does Cronenberg go back to his dark side with Cosmopolis, a film so arty it fails terribly.

Based on a novel by Don DeLillo Cosmopolis is set in downtown New York and follows billionaire businessman, Eric Packer (Robert Pattinson – Bel Ami, The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn Part 1) who demands to be taken across town for a haircut from his favourite barber despite warnings from his Security Head, Torval (Kevin Durnad – Edwin Boyd, Real Steel) who says the trip will be virtually impossible due to most of the city being closed down for the arrival of The President.

As Eric’s driver, Ibrahim (Abdul Ayoola – Immortals, Look Again) slowly drives Eric’s luxurious limo across town the film documents Eric’s interactions with various people including his new wife (who only seems to be around at meal times), Elise (Sarah Gadon – Antiviral, Dream House), his ex Didi (Juliette Binoche – An Open Heart, Another Woman’s Life), business partner Shiner (Jay Baruchel – Goon, TV’S Being Human) and security detail Nina (Marcia Juan Garcias – newcomer)

Cosmopolis is a slow grind, largely due to the fact that there is very little story there in the beginning. In fact the film really only comes to life in the last twenty minutes during a tense standoff between Eric and Benno (Paul Giamatti – Rock Of Ages, John Dies At The End). This finale is beautifully scripted and both Giamatti and Pattinson rise the challenge,,, unfortunately the rest of the film lets it down.

Cronenberg’s script is just a dead weight. They idea they he could create a new language, in the vein of Shakespeare, was ill thoughout as it really does is alienate the audience from the film even more. The mere fact that the script has very little (almost no) characterization leaves the audience asking even more questions on what they are seeing on the screen… and in the end the film just falls on top of itself.

To his credit Robert Pattinson does put in a good performance, it’s just not convincing that he can actually understand what he is saying at times, but even he is outshone by Giamatti who puts in a brilliant performance that leaves the rest of the cast for dead.

Cosmopolis is just one big black hole. Cronenberg tries to tackle some big issues but makes the film so alternative it is virtually impossible to understand.

Other Subculture Media Reviews of Cosmopolis: http://www.helium.com/items/2355096-movie-reviews-cosmopolis-2012.

Rating: 1.5/5 Stars

IMDB Rating: Cosmopolis (2012) on IMDb