Monthly Archives: February 2013

AFCA

And the winners are:

BEST DOCUMENTARY: Searching For Sugarman

BEST OVERSEAS FILM (ENGLISH LANGUAGE): Hugo

BEST OVERSEAS FILM (FOREIGN LANGUAGE): A Separation

BEST OVERALL PRODUCTION DESIGN: Silke Fisher (Lore)

BEST MUSIC SCORE: Cezary Skubiszewski (The Sapphires)

BEST EDITING: Martin Connor (Burning Man)

BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY: Adam Arkapaw (Lore)

BEST SCREENPLAY: Cate Shortland & Robin Mukherjee (Lore)

BEST ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE: Jessica Mauboy (The Sapphires)

BEST ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE: Garry Waddell (The King Is Dead)

BEST ACTRESS: Saskia Rosendahl (Lore)

BEST ACTOR: Joel Edgerton (Wish You Were Here)

BEST DIRECTOR: Cate Shortland (Lore)

BEST FILM: The Sapphires

AFCA Writing Awards

Ivan Hutchinson Award For Writing On Australian Films: Josh Nelson (God In All Things – Hail)

Award For Writing On Non-Australian Film: Rebecca Harkins Cross (The Shape Of Rage – Dangerous Methods)

Award For A Review Of An Individual Australian Film: Michael Scott (All The Way Through Evening)

Award For A Review Of An Individual Non-Australian Film: Laurence Barber (The Perks Of Being A Wallflower & The Masters Of Being)

AFCA

The nominations for the 2013 AFCA Awards are:

BEST FILM: Hail, Lore, The King Is Dead, The Sapphires, Wish You Were Here

BEST DIRECTOR: Wayne Blair (The Sapphires), Amiel Courtin-Wilson (Hail), Kieran Darcy-Smith (Wish You Were Here), Ralph de Heer (The King Is Dead), Cate Shortland (Lore)

BEST ACTOR: Joel Edgerton (Wish You Were Here), Matthew Goode (Burning Man), Daniel P Jones (Hail), Ewen Leslie (Dead Europe), Chris O’Dowd (The Sapphires)

BEST ACTRESS: Toni Collette (Mental), Deborah Mailman (The Sapphires), Felicity Price (Wish You Were Here), Saskia Rosendahl (Lore), Sarah Snook (Not Suitable For Children)

BEST ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE: Marton Csokas (Dead Europe), Liev Schrieber (Mental), Kodi Smit-McPhee (Dead Europe), Antony Starr (Wish You Were Here), Garry Waddell (The King Is Dead)

BEST ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE: Essie Davis (Burning Man), Rebecca Gibney (Mental), Deborah Mailmen (Mental), Jessica Mauboy (The Sapphires), Bojana Novakovic (Burning Man)

BEST SCREENPALY: Amiel Courtin-Wilson (Hail), Cate Shortland & Robin Mukherjee (Lore), Rolf de Heer (The King Is Dead), Keith Thompson & Tony Briggs (The Sapphires), Kieran Darcy-Smith & Felicity Price (Wish You Were Here)

BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY: Adam Arkapaw (Lore), Germain McMicking (Hail), Germain McMicking (Dead Europe), Jules O’Loughlin (Wish You Were Here), Garry Phillips (Burning Man), Warwick Thornton (The Sapphires)

BEST EDITING: Jason Ballantine (Wish You Were Here), Martin Connor (Burning Man), Dany Cooper (The Sapphires), Veronika Jenet (Lore), Peter Sciberras (Hail)

BEST MUSIC SCORE: Steve Benwell (Hail), Antony Partos (33 Postcards), Max Richter (Lore), Cezary Skubiszewski (The Sapphires), Graham Tardif (The King Is Dead)

BEST OVERALL PRODUCTION DESIGN: Zohie Castalleno (Hail), Melinda Doring (The Sapphires), Silke Fischer (Lore), Steven Jones-Evans (Burning Man), Graham Walker (Mental)

BEST INTERNATIONAL FILM (FOREIGN LANGUAGE): A Separation, Holy Motors, Le Havre, The Kid With A Bike, The Raid

BEST INTERNATIONAL FILM (ENGLISH LANGUAGE): Argo, Beasts Of The Southern Wild, Deep Blue Sea, Hugo, Moonrise Kingdom

BEST DOCUMENTARY: All The Way Through Evening, I Am 11, Life In Movement, Paul Kelly: Stories Of Me, Searching For Sugarman

Amour

Summary: Georges (Trintignant) and Anne (Riva) are in their eighties. They are cultivated, retired music teachers. Their daughter (Huppert), who is also a musician, lives abroad with her family. One day, Anne has an attack. The couple’s bond of love is severely tested.

Year: 2013

Australian Cinema Release Date: 21st February, 2013

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: France/Germany/Austria

Director: Michael Haneke

Screenwriter: Michael Haneke

Cast: Isabelle Huppert (Eva), Emmanuelle Riva (Anne), Alexandre Tharaud (Alexandre), William Shimell (Geoff), Jean-Louis Trintignant (Georges)

Runtime: 122 mins

Classification:M

Dave Griffiths’s ‘Amour’ Review: Check Episode #21 of our The Good The Bad The Ugly Podcast for a more in-depth review of ‘Armour’.

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘Hyde Park On Hudson′: Nil.

Rating: N/A

IMDB Rating: Amour (2012) on IMDb

The Good The Bad The Ugly

This week Nick, Dave, Greg and Adam take a look at Amour, Playing For Keeps, Beautiful Creatures, The Last Stand and Cirque De Soleil: Worlds Away.

This epsidoe also includes interviews with the cast of ‘Beautiful Creatures’, Arnold Schwarznegger, Johnny Knoxville, Gerard Butler and Jessica Biel. The boys also have a look at what are the best and worst Arnie movies of all time.

 

The Last Stand

Summary: After leaving his LAPD narcotics post following a bungled operation that left him wracked with remorse and regret, Sheriff Ray Owens (Schwarzenegger) moved out of Los Angeles and settled into a life fighting what little crime takes place in sleepy border town Sommerton Junction. But that peaceful existence is shattered when Gabriel Cortez (Eduardo Noriega), the most notorious, wanted drug kingpin in the western hemisphere, makes a deadly yet spectacular escape from an FBI prisoner convoy. With the help of a fierce band of lawless mercenaries led by the icy Burrell (Peter Stormare), Cortez begins racing towards the US-Mexico border at 250 mph in a specially-outfitted Corvette ZR1 with a hostage in tow.

Year: 2013

Australian Cinema Release Date: 21st February, 2013

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA

Director: Jee-woom Kim

Screenwriter: Andrew Knauer, Jeffrey Nachmanoff, George Nolfi

Cast: Jaimie Alexander (Sarah Torrance), Rio Alexander (Faceburn), John Patrick Amedori (Agent Mitchell), Chris Browning (Pony Tail), James Burnett (Poyo), Richard Dillard (Irv), Eddie J. Fernandez (Agent McKay), Tait Fletcher (Eagen), Zach Gilford (Jerry Bailey), Lois Geary (Mrs. Salazar), Matthew Greer (Sam), Luis Guzman (Mike Figuerola), Daniel Henney (Phil Hayes), Kent Kirkpatrick (Agent Korman), Johnny Knoxville (Lewis Dinkum), Sonny Landham (Henry), Christiana Leucas (Christie), David Midthunder (Cohan), Eduardo Noriega (Gabriel Cortez), Kristen Rakes (Agent Devers), Genesis Rodriguez (Agent Ellen Richards), Rodrigo Santoro (Frank Martinez), Arnold Schwarznegger (Ray Owens), Mark Sivertsen (Bucho), Harry Dean Stanton (Mr. Parsons), Peter Stormare (Burrell), Jermaine Washington (McCesson), Forest Whitaker (Agent John Bannister), Kevin Wiggins (Chief Elkins)

Runtime: 107 mins

Classification:MA15+

Dave Griffiths’s ‘The Last Stand’ Review: 

Please check Dave Griffiths’s review of ‘The Last Stand’ that is available on the Helium Entertainment Channel.

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘The Last Stand′: Check Episode #21 of our The Good The Bad The Ugly Podcast for a more in-depth review of ‘The Last Stand’.

Rating: 3.5/5

IMDB Rating:The Last Stand (2013) on IMDb

Cirque du Soleil; Worlds Away

Summary: From the big top to the big screen, visionary filmmaker James Cameron and director Andrew Adamson (Shrek, Narnia) invite you and your family on an all new 3D adventure: Cirque du Soleil Worlds Away. A young couple who is separated must journey through the astonishing and dreamlike worlds of Cirque du Soleil to find each other, as audiences experience the immersive 3D technology that will allow them to leap, soar, swim, and dance with the performers. This holiday season, Cirque du Soleil brings their world to your city!

Year: 2013

Australian Cinema Release Date: 21st February, 2013

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA

Director: Andrew Adamson

Screenwriter: Andrew Adamson

Cast: Dallas Barnett (Boss), John Clarke (Sad Clown), Lutz Halbhubner (Ringmaster), Erica Linz (Mia), Igor Zaripov (The Aerialist)

Runtime: 91 mins

Classification:G

Dave Griffiths’s ‘Cirque du Soleil: Worlds Away’ Review: 

Dave’s Review of ‘Cirque du Soleil: Worlds Away’ can be found on the Helium Entertainment Channel.

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘Cirque du Soleil: Worlds Away′: Check Episode #21 of our The Good The Bad The Ugly Podcast for a more in-depth review of ‘Cirque du Soleil: Worlds Away’.

Rating: 2.5/5

IMDB Rating:Cirque du Soleil: Worlds Away (2012) on IMDb

Beautiful Creatures

Summary: A supernatural love story set in the South, Beautiful Creatures tells the tale of two star-crossed lovers: Ethan (Alden Ehrenreich), a young man longing to escape his small town, and Lena (Alice Englert), a mysterious new girl. Together, they uncover dark secrets about their respective families, their history and their town.

Year: 2013

Australian Cinema Release Date: 21st February, 2013

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA

Director: Richard LaGravenese

Screenwriter: Richard LaGravenese, Kami Garcia (novel), Margaret Stohl (novel)

Cast: Bryan Adrian (Billy), Eileen Atkins (Gramma), Camille Balsamo (Katherine Duchannes), Tiffany Boone (Savannah Snow), Beau Brasseaux (Caster Shades), Richard Brosnahan (Genevieve Duchannes), Leslie Castay (Principal Herbert), Lindsay Clift (Althea Duchannes), Milton Crosby (Earl), Viola Davis (Amma), Zoey Deutch (Emily Asher), Alden Ehrenreich (Ethan Wate), Alice Englert (Lena Duchannes), J.D. Evermore (Mitchell Wate), Lucy Faust (Juliette Duchannes), Andrea Frankle (Lila Wate), Kyle Gallner (Larkin Ravenwood), Sam Gilroy (Ethan Carter Wate), Cindy Hogan (Mrs. Asher), Jeremy Irons (Macon Ravenwood), Thomas Mann (Link), Margo Martindale (Aunt Del), Treston Miles (Emory), Gwendolyn Mulamba (Mrs. Snow), Lance E. Nichols (Mayor Snow), Philippe Radelet (Suttler), Randy Redd (Revered Stephens), Emmy Rossum (Ridley Duchannes), Robin Skye (Mrs. Hester), Emma Thompson (Mrs. Lincoln/Sarafine), Jackie Tuttle (Isobel Duchannes), Pruitt Taylor Vince (Mr. Lee), Justine Wachsberger (Justine Duchannes), Teri Wyble (Charlotte Duchannes)

Runtime: 124 mins

Classification:M

Dave Griffiths’s ‘Beautiful Creatures’ Review: 

If you’ve seen all the publicity around ‘Beautiful Creatures’ you’ll know that it is supposed to be the replacement film for all of those who have been in mourning since both the ‘Twilight’ and ‘Harry Potter’ franchises have come to a close. The sad fact is however that ‘Beautiful Creatures’ is so bad that it doesn’t deserve to be mentioned in the same breath as the other films.

Based on the semi-successful series of novels by Kami Garcia and Margaret Stohl ‘Beautiful Creatures’ follows Ethan Wate (Alden Ehrenreich – ‘Twixt’, ‘Stoker’) a young literature obsessed high school student who since the death of his beloved mother and dreamt of the day that he can escape from Gatlin, South Carolina instead of wasting his days away in a dead-water town with his best friend, Link (Thomas Mann – ‘Hansel & Gretel: Witch Hunters’, ‘Fun Size’).

Then suddenly Gatlin is made a little bit brighter by the arrival of Lena Duchannes (Alice Englert – ‘In Fear’, ‘Ginger & Rosa’) who is sent to live with her mysterious uncle Macon Ravenwood (Jeremy Irons – ‘Night Train To Lisbon’, ‘The Words’). The religious townsfolk have always been critical of the family for years believing that they practice in witchcraft and they instantly decide that Lena should leave especially after an incident that sees Emily Asher (Zoey Deutsch – TV’S ‘Ringer’, TV’S ‘Switched At Birth’) and Savannah Snow (Tiffany Boone – TV’S ‘Unmatchable’, TV’S ‘Suburgatory’) injured.

When Lena finally allows Ethan close to her he learns that she is a caster (fancy name for witch) but that she is scared that on her sixteenth birthday she may turn dark like the other females in her family, something that family members Sarafine (Emma Thompson – ‘Brave’, ‘Men In Black 3’) and Ridley (Emmy Rossum – TV’S ‘Inside’, TV’S ‘Shameless’) are counting on happening. And while it appears that it is written in stone that doesn’t stop Lena, Ethan, Macon and local ‘seer’ Amma (Viola Davis – ‘Won’t Back Down’, ‘Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close’) from trying to prevent it from happening.

It is surprising just how bad ‘Beautiful Creatures’ really is. It is obvious that Summit Entertainment wanted to re-create the success they gained with ‘Twilight’ and they have obviously directed screenwriter/director Richard LaGravenese (‘P.S. I Love You’, ‘Freedom Writers’) to make this film as similar to their blockbuster as he could. Sadly though this brings the film completely undone, the soundtrack and the leading lady that looks like she could be Kristen Stewart’s sister almost make the film seem like a parody.

Also adding to the parody feeling are some of the cheesy moments during the film that actually have the audience laughing at instead of with the film… actually some of those moments are so bad there may be a few groans as well as laughs. LaGravenese then drags the film down even further when he tries to introduce some ‘Dark Shadows’ style comedy into a film that really should have been a supernatural horror in the vein of ‘The Craft’.

Sadly the producers of ‘Beautiful Creatures’ couldn’t even get the casting right for the film. Emma Thompson and Jeremy Irons pretty much embarrass themselves in roles that could really tarnish their careers while Alden Ehrenreich is far too old to be playing a teenage romantic lead. And as for Alice Englert well she shouldn’t be giving up her TV work anytime soon because her performance here certainly won’t be having Hollywood producers knocking on her door.

No matter how much of a fan of the genre you are ‘Beautiful Creatures’ is the kind of film that you really need to avoid. This is one of 2013’s shockers… Golden Razzie nominations are sure to follow.

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘Beautiful Creatures′: Check Episode #21 of our The Good The Bad The Ugly Podcast for a more in-depth review of ‘Beautiful Creatures’. Dave Griffiths also has another review of ‘Beautiful Creatures’ available on the Helium Entertainment Channel.

Rating: 2/5

IMDB Rating:Beautiful Creatures (2013) on IMDb

The Good The Bad The Ugly

This week on the show Greg, Dave and Nick take a look at ‘West Of Memphis’, ‘Anna Karenina’, ‘Safe Haven’ and ‘The Sweeney’.

This episode also features interviews with the stars of ‘Anna Karenina’ Jude Law and Keira Knightley and Melbourne filmmaker Zev Howley.

The boys also discuss the best and worst movies to watch on Valentine’s Day and look at new DVD releases that include Lore, On The Road, To Rome With Love and Lawless.

To listen to the show just click here

West Of Memphis

Summary: West Of Memphis examines how a complete failure of justice saw three innocent teenagers found guilty of murder. Detailing their fight to bring the truth to light long after the sentence was handed down, Berg’s film explores the inner workings of a decades-long investigation and how the appeals process revealed shocking and disturbing new information about a case that still haunts the American South.

Year: 2013

Australian Cinema Release Date: 14th February, 2013

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: United States

Director: Amy Berg

Screenwriter: Amy Berg, Billy McMillin

Cast: Michael Baden (himself), Jason Baldwin (himself), Holly Ballard (herself), Jamie Clark Ballard (himself), Jennifer Beardon (herself), Patrick Benca (himself), Steve Braga (himself), Karen Bruewer (herself), David Burnett (himself), Mark Byers (himself), Michael Carson (himself), Dennis Carter (himself), Joyce Cureton (herself), Lorris Davis (herself), Johnny Depp (himself), Vincent Di Maio (himself), Julie Ann Doan (herself (voice)), Stephanie Dollar (herself), John Douglas (himself), Jerry Driver (himself), Steve Drizin (himself), Damien Wayne Echols (himself), Scott Ellington (himself), John N. Fogelman (himself), Mildred French (herself), Sharon French (herself), Joseph Garner (himself), Rachael Geiser (herself), Gail Grinnell (herself), Martin Hill (himself), Cindy Hobbs (herself), Pam Hobbs (herself), Don Horgan (himself), Vicki Hutcheson (herself), David Jacoby (himself), Steve Jones (himself), Mike Ledford (himself), Mara Leveritt (herself), Robert Heath Meeks (himself), Jessie Misskelley (himself), Erin Moriarty (herself), Sheila Muse (herself), Laura Nirider (herself), Capi Peck (herself), Dennis Riordan (himself), Henry Rollins (himself), Judy Sadler (herself), Barry Scheck (himself), Carlos Seals (himself), Patti Smith (herself), Dan Stidham (himself), Eddie Vedder (himself)

Runtime: 147 mins

Classification:MA15+

Dave Griffiths’s ‘West Of Memphis’ Review: Please check Dave’s review of ‘West Of Memphis’ that is available on the Helium Entertainment Channel.

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘West Of Memphis′: Check Episode #20 of our The Good The Bad The Ugly Podcast for a more in-depth review of ‘West Of Memphis’.

Rating: 5/5

IMDB Rating:West of Memphis (2012) on IMDb

Anna Karenina

Summary: The third collaboration of Academy Award nominee Keira Knightley with acclaimed director Joe Wright, following the award-winning boxoffice successes Pride & Prejudice and Atonement, is a bold, theatrical new vision of the epic story of love, adapted from Leo Tolstoy’s timeless novel by Academy Award winner Tom Stoppard (Shakespeare in Love). The story powerfully explores the capacity for love that surges through the human heart.

Set in late-19th-century Russia high-society, the aristocrat Anna Karenina (Knightley) enters into a life-changing affair with the affluent Count Vronsky (Johnson). As Anna questions her happiness and marriage to Alexei Karenin (Law), change comes to all around her.

Year: 2013

Australian Cinema Release Date: 14th February, 2013

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: UK

Director: Joe Wright

Screenwriter: Tom Stoppard, Leo Tolstoy (novel)

Cast: Marine Battier (Mlle. Roland), Max Bennett (Petritsky), Bodil Blain (Princess Sorokina Senior), Nicholas Blatt (Major Domo), Antony Byrne (Colonel Demin), Tannishtha Chatterjee (Masha), Kenneth Collard (Prince Tverskoy), Sam Cox (Kapitonich), Buffy Davis (Agafia), Cara Delevingne (Princess Sorokina), Michelle Dockery (Princess Myagkaya), Steve Evets (Theodore), Emerald Fennell (Princess Merkalova), Aruhan Galieva (Aruhan), Freya Galpin (Masha Oblonsky), Domhnall Gleeson (Levin), Tillie-Bett Grant (Baby Anya), Carl Grose (Korney), Holliday Grainger (Baroness), Paul Ham (Michael), Byran Hands (Mikhail Slyudin), Hera Hilmar (Varya), Thomas Howes (Yashvin), Giles King (Stemov), Keira Knightley (Anna Karenina), Jude Law (Karenin), Henry Lloyd-Jones (Burisov), Susanne Lothar (Princess Scherbatsky), Kelly Macdonald (Dolly), Matthew Macfadyen (Oblonsky), Eric MacLennan (Matey), Jude Monk McGowan (Tuskevitch), Oskar McNamara (Serhoza), Beatrice Morrissey (Vasya Oblonsky), Cecily Morrissey (Lili Oblonsky), Octavia Morrissey (Tanya Oblonsky), Theo Morrissey (Grisha Oblonsky), Luke Newberry (Vasily Lukich), Raphael Personnaz (Alexander Vronsky), Alexandra Roach (Countess Nordston), Guro Nagelhus Schia (Annushka), Bill Skarsgard (Makhotin), Kyle Soller (Korrsunsky), Aaron Taylor-Johnson (Vronsky), Pip Torrens (Prince Shcherbatsky), Alicia Vikander (Kitty), Eros Vlahos (Boris), Emily Watson (Countess Lydia Ivanova), Olivia Williams (Countess Vronsky), David Wilmot (Nikolai), Ruth Wilson (Princess Betsy Tverskoy)

Runtime: 130 mins

Classification:M

Dave Griffiths’s ‘Anna Karenina’ Review: 

Yet another classic masterpiece of literature finds its way onto the big screen with the ambitious project from director Joe Wright (‘Hanna’, ‘The Soloist’) and screenwriter Tom Stoppard (‘Enigma’, TV’S ‘Parade’s End’), a project that has seen them turn Leo Tolstoy’s epic novel ‘Anna Karenina’ into a two-hour film.

For those who have never been forced to read the novel at school the story Based on the classic novel by Leo Tolstoy the film sees Anna Karenina (Keira Knightley – ‘Stars In Shorts’, ‘Seeking A Friend For The End Of The World’) become involved in an intense love triangle with her wealthy husband, Karenin (Jude Law – ‘Side Effects’, ‘Rise Of The Guardians’) and a young soldier, Vronsky (Aaron Taylor-Johnson – ‘Savages’, ‘Albert Nobbs’). While her relationship with Karenin seems steady, Anna must face potential status ruin if she wants to pursue this new exciting love.

Meanwhile Levin (Domhnall Gleeson – ‘Dredd’, ‘Shadow Dancer’) finally plucks up the courage to ask the beautiful Kitty (Alicia Vikander – ‘A Royal Affair’, ‘The Crown Jewels’) to marry him, but because she is also wrapped up in Vronsky she says no, which in turn shatters Levin and has him sadly wasting away.

To his credit Joe Wright doesn’t exactly rest on his laurels and produce yet another period film, no he instead decides to be a little creative and film most of ‘Anna Karenina’ inside a theatre, the end result is a film in the vein of ‘Moulin Rouge!’ that seems to suggest that this is a very public love affair that needs an audience. This inventive style, which includes sets changing in front of the audience’s eyes, does take a little while to get used to but once you feel that you are in line with the flow it actually ends up looking pretty sensational.

Still Wright is let down a little by Stoppard’s work. The original ‘Anna Karenina’ meanders through a lot of characters lives and sadly it seems that Stoppard seems to include too many of these characters in this film version. The main emphasis needs to on Anna/Karenin/Vronsky love triangle, but while the Levin and Kitty romance is entertaining to watch it seems that throughout the film it gets in the way of the main story, especially when those characters are geographically removed from being anywhere near Anna.

The big plus side to ‘Anna Karenina’ is the acting. Keira Knightley puts in one of her best performances in years and she well supported by Aaron Taylor-Johnson who although very removed from the role that made him famous, in ‘Kick-Ass’) puts in a wonderful performance… as does Alicia Vikander who on the back of her performance in ‘A Royal Affair’ indicates that she has a very big future ahead of her.

Sadly these performances are dragged down by Jude Law who surprisingly puts in one of his few poor performances. It seems as though he feels that the character of Karenin should never show emotion on his face, which seems like a poor choice seeing Karenin shows emotion in the film a lot – whether it be sadness or anger.

As far as modern blockbusters go ‘Anna Karenina’ is well worth a look. Wright’s interesting and inventive visual styling certainly brings something to the film, although there are a couple of lulls in the film that have been known to put audience members to sleep.

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘Anna Karenina′: Check Episode #20 of our The Good The Bad The Ugly Podcast for a more in-depth review of ‘Anna Karenina’. Dave Griffiths also has another review of ‘Anna Karenina’ available on the Helium Entertainment Channel.

Rating: 3/5

IMDB Rating:Anna Karenina (2012) on IMDb