Tagged: Olivia Colman

London Road

Summary: Based on actual events London Road looks at the reactions of local residents in a quiet street named London Road in Ipswich whose peaceful neighborhood was at first disturbed by the arrival of prostitutes deciding to sell their trade in their street and then the craziness and fear that resulted after a serial killer murdered five of the woman.

With a script that has dialogue that comes straight from the interviews conducted with the residents over a three year period London Road explores how everyday people such as a taxi driver named Mark (Tom Hardy) and local residents like Dodge (Paul Thornley) and Julie (Olivia Colman) cope with the resulting media and Police circus.

Year: 2015

Australian Cinema Release Date: 24th September 2015

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: UK

Director: Rufus Norris

Screenwriter: Alecky Blythe

Cast: Angela Bain (Kath), Rae Baker (Anglia Newsreader), Jason Barnett (Chris Eakin), Gillian Bevan (Colette McBeth), Clare Burt (Jan), Steve Carroll (Tony – Kerb Crawler), Olivia Colman (Julie), Rosealie Craig (Kelly McCormack), Calvin Demba (Alec), Anita Dobson (June), James Doherty (Seb), Kate Fleetwood (Vicky), Hal Fowler (David Crabtree), Michael Fox (Nightclub Bill), Richard Frame (Jason Photographer), Jenny Galloway (Margaret), Jonathan Glew (Steve Cameraman), Amy Griffiths (Sarah), Anna Hale (Jessica), Tom Hardy (Taxi Driver Mark), Linzi Hateley (Helen), Janet Henfrey (Ivy), Rose Hilal (Hayley), Paul Hilton (Tim), Nick Holder (Ron), Ruby Holder (Stephanie), Philip Howard (Bob), Sean Kinglsey (Alan), Mark Lockyer (Grahame Cooper), Helen Lymbery (Stella), Barry McCarthy (Harry), Jayne McKenna (Imelda), Claire Moore (Counciller Carole), Michael Shaeffer (Simon Newton), Mark Sheals (Wayne), Nicola Sloane (Rosemary), Frank Stone (George – Kerb Crawler), Paul Thornley (Dodge), Morgan Walters (Graeme), Howard Ward (Terry), Duncan Wiseby (Gordon)

Runtime: 91 mins

Classification: M

 

OUR LONDON ROAD REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

David Griffiths:

London Road is not an easy film to talk about because to be brutally honest this is a film that is going to divide cinemagoers like no other film this year. On the one hand London Road is a breath of fresh air in the cinema, a type of film that we haven’t really seen before. But then on the other hand all the things that make it so different are also the things that are going to make this film appeal to a very small audience indeed.

For those not in the know London Road is based on the popular National Theatre production that had critics and audiences raving. Now the name National Theatre shouldn’t be foreign to cinema lovers any more. Over the past few years the theatre company have reached out into cinemas with countless productions that have featured some of cinemas’ biggest names – Danny Boyle directed Jonny Lee Miller and Benedict Cumberbatch in Frankenstein, Kenneth Branagh directed Macbeth and Gillian Anderson starred in A Streetcar Named Desire. With these productions filling cinemas worldwide it is very little wonder that the National Theatre have decided to look at other ways to bring their work to the cinema and the result is London Road, a film that is produced by them, stars most of their actors and is directed by Rufus Norris, a Tony nominated theatre director who has had a few films reach the cinemas over the years as well.

Now this is where things get tricky for London Road. The idea of creating a modern day musical about a spate of prostitute murders is so different to anything we have ever seen before that it is actually something that is worth watching. At times the film does really draw you in but the alternative style of musical theatre that makes up the score never really allows its audience to comfortably forget the fact they are watching a musical. The key to a good musical films – things like Sweeney Todd, Moulin Rouge or Rock Of Ages – is to make the audience forget that most of the dialogue is being delivered in song, but here the fact that the songs often contain the one piece of dialogue used over and over again, and the fact that in trying to make this film feel natural they haven’t selected the best singers in the world means that for the entire film you are conscious of the fact that you are watching a musical.

On the plus side though London Road is different enough that it does draw you in. You genuinely feel sorry for the innocent members of the public that through no fault of their own got swept up in this Ipswich Ripper case and at times the directional hand of Rufus Norris does creatively show things such as how scared young girls were scared to walk down the street or were judging every man they meet. Moments like a radio station capitalizing on the murders by running a promotion giving away personal alarms for women are memorable but the most powerful part of this film is when you start to hear the stories of some of the prostitutes who worked in London Road at the time and the effect that the murders had on them.

Aside from those moments the other thing that works for London Road is the fact that there will be one or two characters that each audience member will warm to and you find yourselves really wanting to go on the journey with them. Dodge played by Paul Thornley is one such character and he is one of the more interesting characters. Unfairly you sometimes wonder if he is the killer because of his appearance and seemingly unhealthy obsession with the prostitutes early on the film, and as a result characters like this become a lot more interesting then people like Mark who you know have only been added to the film to get a big name actor like Tom Hardy into the film. While these appearances are a little unnecessary we do learn rather quickly that it’s a good thing that Nolan didn’t want Hardy to portray a musical version of Bain.

London Road is a film that is only going to be lapped up by a very small clique of audience members. Its musical stylings are a little too alternative for you traditional musical lovers while the film is too musical for lovers of alternative cinema. It’s quite a pickle the film finds itself in, but the core problem is that the filmmakers didn’t seem to realise that audiences are a lot more open to alternative theatre than alternative film. Still London Road is worth a look if you like your cinema on the quirky side and it certainly shouldn’t be described as a bad film.
 

 

Stars(3)

 

 

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5):  Stars(3)

 

IMDB Rating: London Road (2015) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment London Road reviews: You can listen to our full London Road  review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #147. You can also read our London Roadi review on The Book The Film The T-Shirt.

Trailer:

Cuban Fury

Summary: A former salsa prodigy attempts a comeback years after his career was ruined by a rival dancer.

Year: 2014

Australian Cinema Release Date: 20th March, 2014

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: UK

Director: James Griffiths

Screenwriter: Jon Brown

Cast: Liz Cackowski (Paula), Alex Clarke (James), Olivia Colman (Sam), Nick Frost (Bruce Garrett), Yanate Fuentes (Alicia), Rashida Jones (Julia), Michael Keat (The Cuban Brothers Miguel Mantovani), Rory Kinnear (Gary), Ethan J. Knight (Andrew), Wendi McLendon-Covey (Carly), Ian McShane (Ron Parfait), Susana Montero (Gloria), Kayvan Novak (Bejan), Chris O’Dowd (Drew), Kengo Oshima (The Cuban Brothers Kengo-San), Simon Pegg (Driver), Tim Plester (Mickey), Ben Radcliffe (Young Bruce), James Reilly (Harvey), Alexandra Roach (Helen), Philippe Spall (Mr. Jarvis), Isabella Steinbarth (Young Sam), Alison Thurgood (Gemma)

Runtime: 98 mins

Classification:M

OUR CUBAN FURY REVIEWS & RATINGS:

David Griffiths:

After the disappointment that was The World’s End last year actor Nick Frost really owes his fans something special. While there have been the obvious films such as Hot Fuzz and Shaun Of The Dead that have seen Nick Frost at his best, he also manages to surprise cinema goers every now and then with surprise hits like Attack Of The Block. Now comes Cuban Fury a film that certainly isn’t a masterpiece, but a film that is just likable to make it a crowd favourite.

Frost plays Bruce Garrett a lovable loser in life who in his junior days was a champion salsa dancer. During that period he was known for his heels of fire and his coach, Ron Parfait (Ian McShane) led him and his dance partner, his sister Sam (Olivia Colman) to dance title after dance title. But then Bruce’s life changed forever when he found himself bashed by a gang who took exception to his sequin shirt that he was wearing to the National Championships. At that moment Bruce turned his back on his dancing career and made a vow to never salsa again.

Flash forward quite a number of years and Bruce know works for a company that designs industrial lathes. He enjoys his life but there isn’t much for him to do. He works, hangs out with Sam at the bar that she works in and then once a week catches up with his loser friends and plays golf with them.

But then suddenly something comes into Bruce’s life that gives it meaning again – his new boss Julia (Rashida Jones). While Bruce wants to win the hand of the fair maiden he finds himself constantly put down by his arch rival in love, the bully Drew (Chris O’Dowd) and finds himself believing that there is no possible way he can win her affection. It is then that he discovers Julia has a love for salsa and wonders whether or not it is possible to capture that old magic once again.

Director James Griffiths (who is mostly known for his television work) really has found himself at the helm of a safe film when it comes to Cuban Fury. Screenwriter, Jon Brown has handed him a script that is full of clichés but also has that winning formula that has made a few dime-a-dozen comedies work over the years. Yes Cuban Fury isn’t the kind of film that will win awards or win over the serious cinema goer but will certainly entertain your average popcorn set film fan.

Brown’s script is interesting. It is sign-posted within an inch of its life but at the same time manages to throw up in just enough laughs to lure the audience in and having them chuckling along with the film as it goes. Film buffs that have seen a lot of films over the years will be able to pick exactly where this film is going from scene-to-scene but at the same time they won’t be disappointed as the laughs are more than enough to keep them entertained.

The saddest thing about the script of Cuban Fury though is at times it does hold back its cast. Rashida Jones, Olivia Colman, Ian McShane and Kayvan Novak (who play extremely stereotypical gay Arab, Bejan) are given so little to do during the film that they don’t even have to raise a sweat as they breeze through their lines. However the script doesn’t seem to handicap the comedic abilities of its two leads though. Chris O’Dowd seems to relish being able to play the bully-boy while Frost overcomes the fact that he has one of the least dancer-like bodies in the history of cinema to deliver a lovable performance. The dance-off between O’Dowd and Frost is one of the highlights of the film.

Cuban Fury overcomes its clichéd script to become a watchable beer-and-pizza comedy that will be enjoyed by men and women alike. There’s also a brief appearance by Simon Pegg for all the fans of The Cornetto Trilogy.

Stars(2.5)

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5): Stars(2.5)

IMDB Rating:  Cuban Fury (2014) on IMDb

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘Cuban Fury′: Nil.

Trailer:

Hyde Park On Wilson

Summary: In June 1939, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt (Academy Award nominee Bill Murray) and his wife Eleanor (Olivia Williams) host the King and Queen of England (Samuel West and Olivia Colman) for a weekend at the Roosevelt home at Hyde Park on Hudson, in upstate New York – the first-ever visit of a reigning English monarch to America. With Britain facing imminent war with Germany, the Royals are desperately looking to FDR for support. But international affairs must be juggled with the complexities of FDR’s domestic establishment, as wife, mother, and mistresses all conspire to make the royal weekend an unforgettable one. Seen through the eyes of Daisy (Academy Award nominee Laura Linney), Franklin’s neighbor and intimate, the weekend will produce not only a special relationship between two great nations, but, for Daisy – and through her, for us all – a deeper understanding of the mysteries of love and friendship.

Year: 2013

Australian Cinema Release Date: 28th March, 2013

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: United Kingdom

Director: Roger Michell

Screenwriter: Richard Nelson

Cast: Nancy Baldwin (Mrs Astor), Jonathan Brewer (Ish-ti-opi), Olivia Colman (Elizabeth), Samantha Dakin (Mary), Jason Durran (Nelson)Andrew Havill (Cameron), Kumiko Konisho (Princess Te Alta), Laura Linney (Daisy), Elizabeth Marvel (Missy), Martin McDougall (Tommy), Bill Murray (FDR), Blake Ritson (Johnson,), Parker Sawyers (Thomas), Samuel West (Bertie), Olivia Williams (Eleanor), Elizabeth Wilson (Mrs. Roosevelt)

Runtime: 95 mins

Classification:CTC

Dave Griffiths’s ‘Hyde Park On Hudson’ Review: Please check Dave’s review of ‘Hyde Park On Hudson’ that is available on the Helium Entertainment Channel.

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘Hyde Park On Hudson′: Check Episode #26 (available 28th March, 2013) of our The Good The Bad The Ugly Podcast for a more in-depth review of ‘Hyde Park On Hudson’.

Rating: 4/5

IMDB Rating:Hyde Park on Hudson (2012) on IMDb

I Give It A Year Helium Review

Summary: Starting where other romantic comedies finish, I GIVE IT A YEAR charts the trials and tribulations of a rather mismatched couple navigating their first year of marriage.

Since meeting, ambitious high-flyer Nat (Rose Byrne) and struggling novelist Josh (Rafe Spall) have been deliriously happy despite their differences. Josh is a thinker, Nat’s a doer… but the spark between them is undeniable. Their wedding is a dream come true, but family and friends think they won’t make it. When Josh’s ex-girlfriend Chloe (Anna Faris) and Nat’s handsome new client Guy (Simon Baker) come into the picture, the situation gets a little more complicated. Neither wants to be the first to give up, but will they make it?

Year: 2013

Australian Cinema Release Date: 28th February, 2013

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: UK

Director: Dan Mazer

Screenwriter: Dan Mazer

Cast: Jane Asher (Diana), Simon Baker (Guy), Rose Byrne (Nat), Olivia Colman (Counsellor), Minnie Driver (Naomi), Anna Faris (Chloe), Jason Flemying (Hugh), Kerry Howard (Clare), Martin John King (Roger), Stephen Merchant (Danny), Joseph Millson (Charlie), Rafe Spall (Josh)

Runtime: 102 mins

Classification:M

Dave Griffiths’s ‘I Give It A Year’ Review: 

For some of the reason it is always the British that rise to the task of delivering a decent comedy, and this time that decent comedy is ‘I Give It A Year’… a film that may be an anti-romance film but is still a cut above most of the romantic comedies that make it to the big screen.

The film begins with the wedding of Nat (Rose Byrne – The Place Beyond The Pines, TV’S Damages) and Josh (Rafe Spall – Life Of Pi, Earthbound), a marriage that almost seems doomed from the start as the priest chokes at an important time and the reception is kind of ruined by the best man, Dan (Stephen Merchant – Movie 43, Hall Pass) whose jokes go down like a lead balloon.

Flash-forward to nine months down the track and now Nat and Josh’s marriage has already hit the skids. The pair decides to try marriage counselling, which almost seems like a mistake seeing they end up being counselled by a counsellor (Olivia Colman – Hyde Park On Hudson, TV’S Accused) so inept at her job she does more damage than good. Their marriage is then further tested when Nat’s new advertising client turns out to be charming American, Guy (Simon Baker – Margin Call, TV’S The Mentalist) while Josh seems to spend more and more time with his ex-girlfriend Chloe (Anna Faris – Movie 43, The Dictator).

Director/screenwriter Dan Mazer (TV’S Dog Bites Man, TV’S Da Ali G Show) does do a lot to make sure ‘I Give It A Year Works’, some of the jokes work a treat but there is still a massive flaw in this film. Like so many comedy films seem to do these days the actors have been directed to pause after they deliver a funny line, works well when the audience is laughing, but too many times in this film that pause is filled with sound of crickets and tumble weeds as the joke goes down like a lead balloon.

Still Mazer does deserve some credit for the work that he has done with ‘I Give It A Year’. Not many people like to ‘break the mould’ when making a romantic comedy and to his credit Mazer doesn’t just break it he shatters it. And while this may be considered an anti-romantic comedy it certainly won’t leave those looking for a bit of a romance in their films out in the cold… it has romance it just goes about telling the story a little differently.

‘I Give It A Year’ sees Rose Byrne once again show that she has a flair for comedy, while Rafe Spall may have been a surprising pick as a leading man but to his credit he does a great job with the material that he is given to work with. Anna Faris also shows that when given a good script she can deliver although most of the comedy points here have to go to Stephan Merchant who steals many of the scenes that he is in.

This may not be the greatest comedy of all time, but it will provide some laughs and is a lot better than many of the other trashy comedies that have surfaced recently.

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘I Give It A Year′: Check Episode #22 of our The Good The Bad The Ugly Podcast for a more in-depth review of ‘I Give It A Year’. Dave Griffiths also has another review of ‘I Give It A Year’ available on the Helium Entertainment Channel.

Rating: 3/5

IMDB Rating: