Tagged: Alessandro Nivola

New Line Cinema’s “The Many Saints of Newark” is the much-anticipated feature film prequel to the groundbreaking, award-winning HBO drama series “The Sopranos.” The film is set in the explosive era of the Newark riots, when rival gangsters began to rise up, challenging the all-powerful DiMeo crime family’s hold over the city.

“The Many Saints of Newark” stars Alessandro Nivola (“Disobedience,” “American Hustle”), Tony winner Leslie Odom Jr. (Broadway’s “Hamilton,” “Murder on the Orient Express”), Jon Bernthal (“Baby Driver,” “The Wolf of Wall Street”), Corey Stoll (“First Man,” “Ant-Man”), Michael Gandolfini (TV’s “The Deuce”), Billy Magnussen (“Game Night,” “The Big Short”), Michela De Rossi (“Boys Cry,” TV’s “The Rats”), John Magaro (“The Finest Hours,” “Not Fade Away”), with Emmy winner Ray Liotta (TV’s “Shades of Blue,” “Goodfellas”) and Oscar nominee Vera Farmiga (“Up in the Air,” “The Conjuring” films).

Alan Taylor (“Thor: The Dark World”), who won an Emmy for his directing work on “The Sopranos,” is helming the film from a screenplay by series creator David Chase & Lawrence Konner, based on characters created by Chase. Chase, Konner and Nicole Lambert are producing the film, with Michael Disco, Marcus Viscidi, Toby Emmerich and Richard Brener serving as executive producers.

Taylor’s behind-the-scenes creative team includes director of photography Kramer Morgenthau (“Creed II,” “Thor: The Dark World”), production designer Bob Shaw (“The Wolf of Wall Street,” “The Sopranos”), Oscar-nominated editor Christopher Tellefsen (“Moneyball,” “A Quiet Place”) and costume designer Amy Westcott (“The Wrestler,” “Black Swan”).

“The Many Saints of Newark” was shot on location in New Jersey and New York, and several beloved characters from the original series that inspired the film are featured in the movie. During its six-season run, “The Sopranos”—widely regarded as one of the greatest and most influential television drama series of all time—was honored with 21 Primetime Emmy Awards, five Golden Globe Awards, and two Peabody Awards, to name only a portion.

A Most Violent Year

Summary:  In New York City 1981, an ambitious immigrant fights to protect his business and family during the most dangerous year in the city’s history.

Year: 2014

Australian Cinema Release Date: 26th February, 2015

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA

Director: J.C. Chandor

Screenwriter: J.C. Chandor

Cast: Christopher Abbott (Louis Servidio), Jerry Adler (Josef), Pico Alexander (Elias Morales), Albert Brooks (Andrew Walsh), Myrna Cabella (Maria), Suzanne Cerreta (Kathy), Jessica Chastain (Anna Morales), Robert Clohessy (Mr. Rose), Giselle Eisenberg (Catherine Morales), Glenn Fleshler (Arnold Klein), Annie Funke (Lorraine Lefkowitz), Elyes Gabel (Julian), Peter Gerety (Bill O’Leary), William Hill (Eddie), Oscar Issac (Abel Morales), Linda Marie Larson (Debbie), Matthew Maher (John Dominczyk), David Margulies (Saul Lefkowtiz), Elizabeth Marvel (Mrs. Rose), Catalina Sandino Moreno (Luisa), Alessandro Nivola (Peter Forente), David Oyelowo (Lawrence), Jimmy Palumbo (Jimmy O.), Patrick Pitu (Vinny), John Procaccino (Arthur Lewis), Lorna Pruce (Toll Booth Clerk Powell), Jason Ralph (Ian Thompson), Taylor Richardson (Elizabeth Morales), Ben Rosenfield (Alex), Daisy Tahan (Annie Morales), Ashley Williams (Lange)

Runtime: 125 mins

Classification: M

 

OUR A MOST VIOLENT YEAR REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

Greg King:

You can read Greg’s full A Most Violent Year review on www.filmreviews.net.au

Stars(3.5)

 

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5):  Stars(3.5)

 

IMDB Rating: A Most Violent Year (2014) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment A Most Violent Year reviews: You can also hear our A Most Violent Year review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #120.

Trailer:

Devil's Knot

Summary: Based on the true crime and novel by Mara Leveritt, Devil’s Knot explores the murder and trial of three boys that went missing in Memphis in 1993. The crime brings three teenagers to trial and despite pleading innocent and the mounting forensic evidence to support their innocence, the teenagers are persecuted without question and left at the mercy of lawyer Ron Lax who continues to probe deeper into the case and the prejudices that exist within the court of law. The film explores the lives of deeply misunderstood outsiders, their families and communities, and their darkest fantasies. The conviction of the West Memphis Three – Damien Echols, Jesse Misskelley, Jr., and Jason Baldwin – riled the American justice system, shocked a tightly knit religious town and outraged the nation.

Year: 2013

Australian Cinema Release Date: 24th July, 2014

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA

Director: Atom Egoyan

Screenwriter: Paul Harris Boardman, Scott Derrickson, Mara Leveritt (novel)

Cast: Robert Baker (Detective Bryn Ridge), Paul Boardman Jnr. (Michael Moore), Kerry Cahill (Jo Lynn), Brandon Carroll (Bobby DeAngelo), Jack Coghlan (Aaron Hutcherson), Dane DeHaan (Chris Morgan), Kevin Durand (John Mark Byers), Mireille Enos (Vicki Hutcheson), Colin Firth (Ron Lax), Wilbur Fitzgerald (Tom), Michael Gladis (Dan Stidham), Bruce Greenwood (Judge Burnett), Gary Grubbs (Dale Griffis), James Hamrick (Damien Echols), Martin Henderson (Brent Davis), Kristopher Higgins (Jessie Miskelley), Stan Houston (Detective Donald Bray), Brian Howe (Detective McDonough), Ted Huckabee (Steve Jones), Julie Ivey (Melissa Byers), Jet Jurgensmeyer (Stevie Branch), Elias Koteas (Jerry Driver), Matt Letscher (Paul Ford), Rex Linn (Chief Inspector Gitchell), Seth Meriwether (Jason Baldwin), Stephen Moyer (John Fogelman), Bill Murphey (Marty King), Alessandro Nivola (Terry Hobbs), Kristoffer Polaha (Val Price), Anessa Ramsey (Rosie), Amy Ryan (Margaret Lax), Lori Beth Sikes (Annie), Brad D. Smith (Todd Moore), Brandon Spink (Christopher Byers), Matthew Stanton (Detective Durham), Clay Stapleford (Detective Mike Allen), Stephanie Stewart (Domini Teer), Brooke Jaye Taylor (Officer Regina Meeks), Reese Witherspoon (Pam Hobbs), Collette Wolfe (Glori Shettles), Isabella Zentkovich (Amanda Hobbs)

Runtime: 114 mins

Classification: M

 

OUR DEVIL’S KNOT REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

David Griffiths:

The story of The West Memphis Three has been itching to be turned into a feature film for a great deal many years now. Countless documentaries have been made around the case over the years, and so powerful is the story of injustice that it has been impossible for anyone to sit through them without some kind of anger building up inside them. To be brutally honest the whole story (or should that be saga) is really a screenwriter and director’s dream.

Devil’s Knot looks at the case of The West Memphis Three told through the eyes of a private investigator, Ron Lax (Colin Firth) and one of the grieving mothers, Pam Hobbs (Reese Witherspoon). As Hobbs desperately tries to work out what happened in her son’s murder Lax concentrates on the theory that the three accused, Damien Echols (James Hamrick), Jason Baldwin (Seth Meriwether) and Jessie Misskelley (Kristopher Higgins) are innocent.

Oscar nominated director Atom Egoyan decides to tackle the case head-on in his latest film Devil’s Knot. Now a rookie filmmaker may have simply decided that this film should be told through the eyes of one of the accused but Egoyan is smarter than that and instead digs up the story of one of the case’s lesser known players, the private investigator hired by the three accused’s legal team to try and clear their clients name. So not to make the film too one sided Egoyan also tells part of the story through the eyes of Pam Hobbs, a grieving mother who seems more open to the fact that injustice is being done than anyone else involved in the case.

Early on Devil’s Knot is a promising film. It digs up certain parts of the case that are naturally overlooked in most explorations into the case including the mysterious ‘muddied and bloodied black man’ who was spotted in a fast food diner on the night of the murders. But it’s not long after that revolution that Egoyan seems to let Devil’s Knot dangerously let itself down. Just as Lax beguns to uncover series leads that suggest a Police cover-up and Police corruption the film pulls back from how hard-hitting it should have been and instead becomes a court room drama in the vein of a television show like Law & Order.

The second half of Devil’s Knot shows why a director of the class of David Fincher needs to get hold of this story and do something with it. The links of the boys to the occult and Satanic rituals could have taken the film into some dark places while the whole Police corruption element and them deciding to investigate Ron Lax needed to have a lot more suspense put into it then what it shown here. For Devil’s Knot to work there needed to be less of Lax sitting around in an office and talking to the lawyers and more of him actually out on the street doing the leg work – after all he had to be getting these leads from somewhere, right? Perhaps the most ironic thing about how much the screenplay lets down the film is that it comes from the same pen as Deliver Us From Evil, Scott Derrickson.

As a result Egoyan really under uses his two leads. Colin Firth seems like an actor champing at the bit for a dramatic scene right throughout Devil’s Knot while Reese Witherspoon plumps up and heads into the similar character territory she explored in Mud but again she is let down. Instead of allowing her character to deliver some powerful scenes when she starts suspecting her own husband, Terry Hobbs (Alessandro Nivola), as being involved in their son’s murder. It’s a sad point to make but the screenplay here really does let down both Firth and Witherspoon.

Devil’s Knot could easily have been one of the best films of the year, but sadly it is let down by a director and screenwriter who seem reluctant to tap into the suspense that is handed to them on a plate. Instead the second half of the film becomes a slow court room drama that never really lives up to its potential. Colin Firth and Reese Witherspoon try in vain to deliver something but even they are let down dangerously by a script that needed to be much better.

Stars(2.5)

 

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5):  Stars(2.5)

 

IMDB Rating:  Devil's Knot (2013) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment Reviews of ‘Devi’s Knot′: For our full Devil’s Knot review please check The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #89. You can also read Dave’s review on The Book The Film The T-Shirt.

Trailer:

SAG Awards

The 2013 SAG Awards nominations are now in. Here they are:

 

FEATURE FILMS

Outstanding Performance By A Male Actor In A Leading Role

  • Bruce Dern (Nebraska)
  • Chiwetel Ejiofor (12 Years A Slave)
  • Tom Hanks (Captain Phillips)
  • Matthew McConaughey (Dallas Buyers Club)
  • Forest Whitaker (Lee Daniels’ The Butler)

Outstanding Performance By A Female Actor In A Leading Role

  • Cate Blanchett (Blue Jasmine)
  • Sandra Bullock (Gravity)
  • Judi Dench (Philomena)
  • Meryl Streep (August: Osage County)
  • Emma Thompson (Saving Mr. Banks)

Outstanding Performance By A Male Actor In A Supporting Role

  • Barkhad Abdi (Captain Phillips)
  • Daniel Bruhl (Rush)
  • Michael Fassbender (12 Years A Slave)
  • James Gandolfini (Enough Said)
  • Jared Leto (Dallas Buyers Club)

Outstanding Performance By A Female Actor In A Supporting Role

  • Jennifer Lawrence (American Hustle)
  • Lupita Nyong’o (12 Years A Slave)
  • Julia Roberts (August: Osange County)
  • June Squibb (Nebraska)
  • Oprah Winfrey (Lee Daniels’ The Butler)

Outstanding Performance By A Cast In A Motion Picture

  • 12 Years A Slave – Bendict Cumberbatch, Paul Dano, Garrett Dillahunt, Chiwetel Ejiofor, Michael Fassbender, Paul Giamatti, Scoot McNairy, Lupita Nyong’o, Adepero Oduye, Sarah Paulson, Brad Pitt, Michael Kenneth Williams, Alfre Woodward
  • American Hustle – Amy Adams, Christian Bale, Louis C.K., Bradley Cooper, Paul Herman, Jack Huston, Jennifer Lawrence, Alessandro Nivola, Michael Pena, Jeremy Renner, Elisabeth Rohm, Shea Whigham
  • August: Osange County – Abigail Breslin, Chris Cooper, Benedict Cumberbatch, Juliette Lewis, Margo Martindale, Ewan McGregor, Dermot Mulroney, Julianne Nicholson, Julia Roberts, Sam Shepard, Meryl Streep, Misty Upham
  • Dallas Buyers Club – Jennifer Garner, Matthew McConaughey, Jared Leto, Denis O’Hare, Dallas Roberts, Steve Zahn
  • Lee Daniels’ The Butler – Mariah Carey, John Cusack, Jane Fonda, Cuba Gooding Jnr., Terrence Howard, Lenny Kravitz, James Marsden, David Oyelowo, Alex Pettyfer, Vanessa Redgrave, Alan Rickman, Liev Schreiber, Forest Whitaker, Robin Williams, Oprah Winfrey

 

TELEVISION PROGRAMS

Outstanding Performance By A Male Actor In A Television Movie or Mini-Series

  • Matt Damon (Behind The Candelabra)
  • Michael Douglas (Behind The Candelabra)
  • Jeremy Irons (The Hollow Crown)
  • Rob Lowe (Killing Kennedy)
  • Al Pacino (Phil Spector)

Outstanding Performance By A Female Actor In A Television Movie or Mini-Series

  • Angela Bassett (Betty & Coretta)
  • Helena Bonham Carter (Burton And Taylor)
  • Holly Hunter (Top Of The Lake)
  • Helen Mirren (Phil Spector)
  • Elisabeth Moss (Top Of The Lake)

Outstanding Performance By A Male Actor In A Drama Series

  • Steve Buscemi (Boardwalk Empire)
  • Bryan Cranston (Breaking Bad)
  • Jeff Daniels (The Newsroom)
  • Peter Dinklage (Game Of Thrones)
  • Kevin Spacey (House of Cards)

Outstanding Performance By A Female Actor In A Drama Series

  • Claire Danes (Homeland)
  • Anna Gunn (Breaking Bad)
  • Jessica Lange (American Horror Story: Coven)
  • Maggie Smith (Downton Abbey)
  • Kerrry Washington (Scandal)

Outstanding Performance By A Male Actor In A Comedy Series

  • Alec Baldwin (30 Rock)
  • Jason Bateman (Arrested Development)
  • Ty Burrell (Modern Family)
  • Don Cheadle (House Of Lies)
  • Jim Parsons (The Big Bang Theory)

Outstanding Performance By A Female Actor In A Comedy Series

  • Mayim Bialik (The Big Bang Theory)
  • Julie Bowen (Modern Family)
  • Edie Falco (Nurse Jackie)
  • Tina Fey (30 Rock)
  • Julia-Louis Dreyfus (Veep)

Outstanding Performance By An Ensemble In A Drama Series

  • Boardwalk Empire – Patricia Arquette, Margot Bignham, Steve Buscemi, Brian Geraghty, Stephen Graham, Erik La Ray Harvey, Jack Huston, Ron Livingstone, Domenick Lombardozzi, Gretchen Mol, Ben Rosenfield, Michael Stuhlbarg, Jacob Ware, Shea Whigham, Michael Kenneth Williams, Jeffrey Wright
  • Breaking Bad – Michael Bowen, Betsy Brandt, Bryan Cranston, Lavell Crawford, Tait Fletcher, Laura Fraser, Anna Gunn, Matthew T. Metzler, RJ Mitte, Dean Norris, Bob Odenkirk, Aaron Paul, Jesse Plemons, Steven Michael Quezada, Kevin Rankin, Patrick Sane
  • Downton Abbey – Hugh Bonneville, Laura Carmichael, Jim Carter, Brendan Coyle, Michelle Dockery, Kevin Doyle, Jessica Brown Findlay, Siobhan Finneran, Joanne Froggatt, Rob James-Collier, Allen Leach, Phyllis Logan, Elizabeth McGovern, Sophie McShera, Matt Milne, Lesley Nicol, Amy Nuttall, David Robb, Maggie Smith, Ed Speleers, Dan Stevens, Cara Theobold, Penelope Wilton
  • Game Of Thrones – Alfie Allen, John Bradley, Oona Chaplin, Gwendoline Christie, Emilia Clarke, Nikolaj Coster-Waldau, Mackenzie Crook, Charles Dance, Joe Dempsie, Peter Dinklage, Natalie Dormer, Nathalie Emmanuel, Michelle Fairley, Jack Gleeson, Iain Glenn, Kit Harington, Lena Headey, Isaac Hempstead Wright, Kristofer Hivju, Paul Kaye, Sibel Kekilli, Rose Leslie, Richard Madden, Rory McCann, Michael McElhatton, Ian McElhinney, Philip McGinley, Hannah Murray, Iwan Rehon, Sophie Turner, Carice Van Houten, Maisie Williams
  • Homeland – F. Murray Abraham, Sarita Choudhury, Claire Danes, Rupert Friend, Tracy Letts, Damian Lewis, Mandy Patinkin, Morgan Saylor

Outstanding Performance By An Ensemble In A Comedy Series

  • 30Rock – Scott Adsit, Alec Baldwin, Katrina Bowden, Kevin Brown, Grizz Chapman, Tina Fey, Judah Friedlander, Jane Krakowski, John Lutz, James Marsden, Jack McBrayer, Tracey Morgan, Keith Powell
  • Arrested Development – Will Arnett, Jason Bateman, John Beard, Michael Cera, David Cross, Portia De Rossi, Isla Fisher, Tony Hale, Ron Howard, Liza Minnelli, Alia Shawkat, Jeffrey Tambor, Jessica Walter, Henry Winkler
  • The Big Bang Theory – Mayim Bialik, Kaley Cuoco, Johnny Galecki, Simon Helberg, Kunal Nayyar, Jim Parsons, Melissa Rauch
  • Modern Family – Julie Bowen, Ty Burrell, Aubrey Anderson Emmons, Jesse Tyler Ferguson, Nolan Gould, Sarah Hyland, Ed O’Neill, Rico Rodriguez, Eric Stonestreet, Sofia Vergara, Ariel Winter
  • Veep – Sufe Bradshaw, Anna Chlumsky, Gary Cole, Kevin Dunn, Tony Hale, Julia Louis-Dreyfus, Reid Scott, Timothy Simons, Matt Walsh

 

STUNT ENSEMBLE HONORS

Outstanding Action Performance By A Stunt Ensemble In A Motion Picture

  • All Is Lost
  • Fast & Furious 6
  • Lone Survivor
  • Rush
  • The Wolverine

Outstanding Action Performance By A Stunt Ensemble In A Comedy or Drama Series

  • Boardwalk Empire
  • Breaking Bad
  • Game Of Thrones
  • Homeland
  • The Walking Dead

 

American Hustle Poster

Summary: Manhattan-based  con artists Irving Rosenfeld (Christian Bale) and Sydney Prosser (Amy Adams) are forced to work for FBI agent Richie DiMaso (Bradley Cooper) to avoid prosecution following a sting operation. Pushed into a world of New Jersey power brokers and ‘wise-guys’, Irving and Sydney find efforts to clear their names made all the more difficult thanks to DiMaso’s erratic behavior and the unpredictability of Irving’s wife Roslyn (Jennifer Lawrence). Directed by David O. Russell (Silver Lining’s Playbook, The Fighter, Three Kings) and based on an incredible true story, this 1970’s-set award-season contender defies genre, hinging on the comedy of raw emotion, and the drama of life and death stakes.

Year: 2013

Australian Cinema Release Date: 12th December, 2013

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA

Director: David O. Russell

Screenwriter: David O. Russell, Eric Singer

Cast: Amy Adams (Sydney Prosser), Christian Bale (Irving Rosenfeld), Martie Barylick (Helen), Charley Broderick (Rep. John O’Connell), Louis C.K. (Stoddard Thorsen), Colleen Camp (Brenda), Alura Carbrey (Elizabeth Polito), Bradley Cooper (Richie DiMaso), Danny Corbo (Danny Rosenfeld), Sonny Corbo (Danny Rosenfeld), Gary Craig (Jerry Catone), Robert De Niro (Victor Tellegio), Sal DiMino (Lou Salvano), Richard Donnelly (Rep. Sanders), Andres Faucher (Don Hirxel), Kayla Feeney (Lorna Polito), Steve Gagliastro (Agent Schmidt), Armen Garo (Dick Helsing), Robert Glenn (Jerry), Barbara Guertin (Denise), Shannon Halliday (Doreen Polito), Richard Heneks (Al Kalowski), Paul Herman (Alfonse Simone), Jack Huston (Pete Musane), Jennifer Lawrence (Rosalyn Rosenfeld), Adrian Martinez (Julius), Thomas Matthews (Francis Polito), Alessandro Nivola (Anthony Amado), Michael Pena (Paco Hernandez/Sheik Abdullah), Jeremy Renner (Mayor Carmine Polito), Elisabeth Rohm (Dolly Polito), Matthew Russell (Dominic Polito), Zachariah Supka (Young Irv), Bob Taraschi (Rep. Stelford), Chris Tarjan (Agent Stock), Volieda Webb (Melora), Josh Philip Weinstein (Peter Scott), Shea Whigham (Carl Elway), Gary Zahakos (Congressman Keshoygan), Anthony Zerbe (Senator Horton Mitchell)

Runtime: 138 mins

Classification:M

OUR AMERICAN HUSTLE REVIEWS & RATINGS

Adam Ross: Stars(4)

Please check Adam’s review of ‘American Hustle’ that is available on The Crat

Greg King: Stars(4)

Please check Greg’s review of ‘American Hustle’ that is available on www.filmreviews.net.au

David Griffiths:

At the moment director David O. Russell is Hollywood’s darling. It seems everything that he puts in his hands on becomes Oscar fodder. His movies like ‘The Fighter’ and ‘Silver Linings Playbook’ have garnished plenty of Oscar nods over recent years and actors of the calibre of Jennifer Lawrence, Christian Bale and Melissa Leo admit they owe their Oscars to him.

As a director the past has seen Russell fight with his main stars and even have people say they will never work with him again – for that reason it is surprising that he has worked with most of the cast of “American Hustle” before. That certainly being the case with Amy Adams, Christian Bale, Jennifer Lawrence and Bradley Cooper.

This time around Russell focuses on actual events… albeit with some changed names and some poetic licence. An almost unrecognisable Christian Bale, complete with gut and hard-working comb over, plays Irving Rosenfeld a conman who lives a comfortable life making money before returning home to his strange wife, Rosalyn (Jennifer Lawrence) and much loved son each night.

Rosenfeld’s career as a con artist though really takes off after he meets Sydney Prosser (Amy Adams) who becomes his lover and partner-in-crime, although their new found scam soon comes to the attention of a desperate young law enforcement officer, Richie DiMaso (Bradley Cooper). DiMaso’s eagerness soon sees Sydney and Irving wrapped up in an –in-over-their-heads undercover sting designed to bring down community minded mayor Carmine Polito (Jeremy Renner).

Russell is somewhat of a frustrating director to watch. There are times during “American Hustle” when Russell eclipses perfection. The style, feel and plot of the film mirrors what Martin Scorsese has done so well over the years but the difference between the master and Russell is that Scorsese knows when to cull. Where the frustration seeps into “American Hustle” is that Russell will deliver a scene that leaves you gasping at its cinematic brilliance and then follow it up with a scene that should have found itself on the cutting room floor.

That problem leads to bigger problems for the film. Firstly the running time of 138 minutes is way too long and then there is the problem that the audiences’ focus drifts in and out depending on the relevance of the scene. Having said that though “American Hustle” is a good film it just doesn’t ever reach the greatness that it should.

What really saves “American Hustle” are the performances that Russell gets out of his cast. These are obviously actors that completely trust their director. How else could you explain Christian Bale going from Bruce Wayne to a man whose gut hangs over his trousers or the normally modest Amy Adams deciding to play a role where her cleavage is on show more often than not? To their credit though both actors deliver. Bale is his usual smooth self while Adams brings a brand of sexiness to the film that would be beyond most other actresses.

Then there are Jennifer Lawrence and Bradley Cooper’s performances. Russell just directed them amazingly in “Silver Linings Playbook” and he manages to repeat that here. Lawrence brushes aside those who label her as ‘the hunger games girl’ with her best performance since “The Winter’s Bone” while Cooper plays the manic yet immature DiMaso so well he creates one of the most interesting characters to ever hit the screen. Cudos should also go to Jeremy Renner who is also his usual brilliant self.

Despite its flaws “American Hustle” is still a film that demands a viewing. It’s good not great but it will be the film that everybody is talking about this holiday and awards seasons.

 Stars(4)

 

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5): Stars(4)

IMDB Rating:  American Hustle (2013) on IMDb

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘American Hustle′: Please check our American Hustle review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep 62.

Trailer: