Tagged: Paul Greengrass

Jason Bourne

Summary: Jason Bourne, now remembering who he truly is, tries to uncover hidden truths about his past.

Year: 2016

Australian Cinema Release Date: 28th July 2016

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA

Director: Paul Greengrass

Screenwriter: Paul Greengrass, Christopher Rouse, Robert Ludlam (characters)

Cast: Riz Ahmed (Aaron Kalloor), Bill Camp (Malcolm Smith), Vincent Cassel (Asset), Johnny Cicco (Bradley Samuels), Matt Damon (Jason Bourne), Ata Essandoh (Craig Jeffers), Ellie Fox (Officer Jones), Gregg Henry (Richard Webb), Tommy Lee Jones (CIA Director Robert Dewey), Vinzenz Kiefer (Christian Dassault), Stephen Kunken (Baumen), Scott Shepherd (Director NI Edwin Russell), Julia Stiles (Nicky Parsons), Alicia Vikander (Heather Lee)

Runtime: 123 mins

Classification: M

 

OUR JASON BOURNE REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

David Griffiths:

It’s the film that hardcore Jason Bourne fans thought they would never see but yes Jason Bourne is back on the big screen. After ‘The Bourne Ultimatum’ Matt Damon was quoted a number of times that he would never play the role again, even Universal seemed sure of it as they reworked the franchise with a new character that was given to Jeremy Renner to play. But it seems when you listen to a quote, listen to it properly because what Damon said was that he would never do another Bourne film unless Paul Greengrass (‘Captain Phillips’) was in the director’s chair. When Greengrass is back and so is Damon!!!

The film begins with Jason Bourne (Matt Damon – ‘Good Will Hunting’) staying out of sight in Europe and surviving on the money that he makes as he goes around competing in various underground fighting tournaments. He is forced out of hiding though when his former ally Nicky Parsons (Julia Stiles – ‘Save The Last Dance’) hacks into the CIA’s computer network and makes some alarming discoveries about the real identity behind Jason Bourne and how his father was involved.

The hack alerts young CIA agent Heather Lee (Alicia Vikander – Ex-Machina) to what is happening and soon she finds herself working with CIA Director Robert Dewey (Tommy Lee Jones – ‘Men In Black’) to bring Bourne in. Together they bring in a brutal agent named only as Asset (Vincent Cassel – ‘Black Swan’) to put Bourne down while also trying to work out how to best deal with Social Media empire boss Aaron Kalloor (Riz Ahmed – ‘Nightcrawler’) who is threatening to expose the relationship between his social media platform and the CIA.

There is little doubt that Paul Greengrass’ latest entry into the Bourne franchise is pretty sleek but how does it hold up in the modern film environment? To be brutally honest I’ve never really seen Bourne as an elite franchise. While yes the films always look and they have shown that Matt Damon is a more than capable action star, they just don’t do enough to make themselves ‘different’ enough to really impress me. While franchises like ‘Fast & The Furious’ do whatever they can to make each film bigger and better the ‘Bourne’ franchise seems to just chug along doing the same thing each time, without doing much to change the formula along the way.

One of my criticisms levelled at this franchise in the past has been the fact that these films ride a dangerous path. The plots are never intense enough to make you marvel at the screenwriting while the action sequences are normally nothing any different to what we have seen before. Here it is obvious that they have tried to overcome these issues as the screenplay does have a bit more ‘meat’ to it while the car chase through Las Vegas resembles something of a sequence that may stick in some cinema goers minds for at least a few weeks… even though it still isn’t something as spectacular as dropping a car from a plane or jumping cars between high rise in Dubai.

What truly is remarkable here though is Greengrass’ attempt to re-capture the riots that have plagued Greece over the past few years. These sequences are absolutely brilliant and work amazingly well as a back-drop as Asset works feverishly to hunt down Parsons and Bourne. It is with sequences like these that Greengrass comes to the fore, and here he recaptures the same type of suspense that he wowed audiences with throughout ‘Captain Phillips.’ In a lot of ways these scenes are a lot better than the clichéd car chase that serves as a finale here and it will be the main thing that sticks in mind for a while to come.

We do see a vast improvement in the screenplay here as well. While characters like Asset may still be a walking cliché the sub-plot that looks at the CIA being in bed with a social media platform does raise questions such as ‘should the Government spy on us in order to keep us safe?’ while the screenplay also paints a very murky picture to what the audience should expect from Heather Lee. So often action films like this feel the need to show the audience who is good and who is bad without any grey at all. But with Lee the audience is left constantly wondering where her alliance sits. Is the just another lapdog for Dewey or does she have a soft spot for Bourne? It’s actually a relief to find a character in this genre that has the audience constantly questioning their thoughts on said character… and Bourne’s reaction to her at the end is what makes this film’s finale work despite the disappointment of the car chase.

Being written that way makes Heather a dream for a young actress to play and here Alicia Vikander doesn’t disappoint. She really is one of those actresses that just seems to shine no matter what role is thrown at her. Her recent performances in ‘Testament Of Youth’ and ‘The Danish Girl’ show what she is capable of in brilliant films, while here she follows what is written for and plays Heather as a cold, almost emotionless agent who never lets her true feelings known to anyone. While she’s not exactly working with a great script she certainly makes something of it. To her credit she holds her own as she acts alongside Tommy Lee Jones who just breezes through as the ‘bad guy’ while Matt Damon once again shows that he can still hold his own with any action star going around.

While ‘Jason Bourne’ doesn’t exactly set the world on fire or bring anything new to the action genre it is a serviceable film that certainly won’t bore its audience. Greengrass manages to make the film visually attractive but you are left wanting a big action sequence that just never eventuates (‘Star Trek Beyond’ it ain’t), still the film does more than enough to be considered ‘a thinking person’s action film.’
Stars(3)

 

 

Adam Ross

Stars(4)

 

 

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5):   Stars(3.5)

 

IMDB Rating:  Jason Bourne (2016) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment Jason Bourne reviews: Nil.

 

Trailer:

Tom Hanks

When Oscar nominations have been announced over the years Tom Hanks’ name has been read out five times. He has won two Oscars – one for “Philadelphia” and one for “Forrest Gump” – and been nominated for “Big,” “Saving Private Ryan” and “Cast Away.” The mere fact that he has had his name read out five times shows just what a good actor he is, so what are the best films to sit down and watch if you want to see the best that Tom Hanks has to offer.

“Forrest Gump” (1994) – At a quick glance the film “Forrest Gump” should not have worked. The very idea of taking one character and placing him in the right place to be involved in some of the world’s most historic moments sounds like the kind of script that would be too hard to bring to the screen. That wasn’t the case though when Robert Zemeckis tackled this film, instead he made one of the finest films to ever come out of Hollwood. Aside from Zemeckis’ great work you also have a great performance by Tom Hanks in the title role of Forrest Gump. Hanks brought an air of innocence as he played one of the most lovable simpletons of all time.

“Cast Away” (2000) – Hanks also brought his A-game to another film that on paper looked like it should never have worked. The idea of taking a character and placing them on an island where their only partner in conversation is a volleyball sounds like a boring kind of film, yet once again director Robert Zemeckis was up to the task. A disheveled looking Tom Hanks showed the world exactly what ‘against-type’ acting is all about, while making the scenes between him and Wilson the volleyball the kind that the audience can’t take their eyes away from.

“Saving Mr. Banks” (2013) – It’s hard to imagine that when Tom Hanks was asked to play the legendary Walt Disney in 2013’s “Saving Mr. Banks” that it was the first time that anybody had every portrayed the filmmaker on the big screen. The film followed Walt Disney’s fight to bring the film “Mary Poppins” to the big screen when her creator P.L. Travers (Emma Thompson) sticks her heels in and decides things will be done her way. While Hanks’ pretty much bares no physical resemblance to Disney at all he did capture all of his mannerisms and ended up pulling out one of the surprise performances of the year. With Colin Farrell also putting in a great performance the two men and Thompson made this one of the must see films of the year.

“Captain Phillips” (2013) – Over the years Tom Hanks has revealed himself as one of the finest character actors of all time. In 2013 he was on fire delivering good performances in “Cloud Atlas” and “Saving Mr. Banks” but he saved his best for “Captain Phillips.” Director Paul Greengrass worked hard to bring the true story of Captain Richard Phillips’ clash with Somali pirates to the big screen and his leading man delivered in sensational form. Hanks was great throughout the film, but during the final half an hour of the film he gave every other actor in Hollywood an acting lesson. As the film reaches its tensest moments Hanks turns his acting skills up to a level rarely seen and enhanced the film in a way that had critics unloading the praise.

“Toy Story 3” (2010) – Throughout his career Tom Hanks has played so many unique characters that it is easy to forget that one of his best performances came when he was simply voicing a character. A lot of cinema lovers seem to have forgotten over the years that Hanks has voiced the character of the lovable toy cowboy Woody all throughout the “Toy Story” franchise. When it was announced that “Toy Story 3” was going into production a lot of naysayers decided that this would be one too many “Toy Story” films, but they proved to be completely wrong when the film exceeded all expectations and became a gripping tension filled film for children and adults alike. “Toy Story 3” wasn’t just a good film it became one of the best animated films ever made.

It is hard to sit down and look at Tom Hanks’ film career and pick just a few films that are great to watch. Hanks has built a career on making great films so whenever you see his name on a film poster you know you are about to watch something special.

Golden Globe Awards

The 2014 Golden Globe Award nominations are in, here they are:

 

Best Actor In A Mini-Series or TV Movie

  • Matt Damon (Behind The Candelabra)
  • Chiwetel Ejiofor (Dancing On The Edge)
  • Idris Elba (Luther)
  • Al Pacino (Phil Spector)
  • Michael Douglas (Behind The Candelabra)

 

Best Actor In A Motion Picture, Drama

  • Chiwetel Ejiorfor (12 Years A Slave)
  • Matthew McConaughey (Dallas Buyers Club)
  • Tom Hanks (Captain Phillips)
  • Robert Redford (All Is Lost)
  • Idris Elba (Mandela: Long Walk To Freedom)

 

Best Actor In A Motion Picture, Musical or Comedy

  • Bruce Dern (Nebraska)
  • Leonardo DiCaprio (The Wolf Of Wall Street)
  • Christian Bale (American Hustle)
  • Oscar Isaac (Inside Llewyn Davis)
  • Joaquin Phoenix (Her)

 

Best Actor In A TV Series, Comedy

  • Jason Bateman (Arrested Development)
  • Don Cheadle (House Of Lies)
  • Michael J. Fox (The Michael J. Fox Show)
  • Jim Parsons (The Big Bang Theory)
  • Andy Samberg (Brooklyn Nine-Nine)

 

Best Actor In A TV Series, Drama

  • Bryan Cranston (Breaking Bad)
  • Michael Sheen (Masters Of Sex)
  • Kevin Spacey (House Of Cards)
  • James Spader (The Black List)
  • Liev Schreiber (Ray Donovan)

 

Best Actress In A Mini-Series or TV Movie

  • Helena Bonham Carter (Burton And Taylor)
  • Rebecca Ferguson (White Queen)
  • Jessica Lange (American Horror Story:Coven)
  • Helen Mirren (Phil Spector)
  • Elisabeth Moss (Top Of The Lake)

 

Best Actress In A Motion Picture, Drama

  • Cate Blanchett (Blue Jasmine)
  • Sandra Bullock (Gravity)
  • Emma Thompson (Saving Mr. Banks)
  • Judi Dench (Philomena)
  • Kate Winslet (Labor Day)

 

Best Actress In A Motion Picture, Musical Or Comedy

  • Meryl Streep (August: Osage County)
  • Julia Louis-Dreyfus (Enough Said)
  • Amy Adams (American Hustle)
  • Julie Delpy (Before Midnight)
  • Greta Gerwig (Frances Ha)

 

Best Actress In A TV Series, Comedy

  • Zooey Deschanel (New Girl)
  • Lena Dunham (Girls)
  • Julia Louis-Dreyfus (Veep)
  • Amy Poehler (Parks And Recreation)
  • Edie Falco (Nurse Jackie)

 

Best Actress In A TV Series, Drama

  • Julianna Margulies (The Good Wife)
  • Kerry Washington (Scandal)
  • Tatiana Maslany (Orphan Black)
  • Robin Wright (House Of Cards)
  • Taylor Schilling (Orange Is The New Black)

 

Best Animated Feature Film

  • Frozen
  • The Croods
  • Despicable Me 2

 

Best Director – Motion Picture

  • Alfonso Cuaron (Gravity)
  • Steve McQueen (12 Years A Slave)
  • David O. Russell (American Hustle)
  • Paul Greengrass (Captain Phillips)
  • Alexander Payne (Nebraska)

 

Best Foreign Language Film

  • Blue Is The Warmest Color
  • The Past
  • The Hunt
  • The Wind Rises
  • The Great Beauty

 

Best Motion Picture, Drama

  • 12 Years A Slave
  • Gravity
  • Captain Phillips
  • Rush
  • Philomena

 

Best Motion Picture, Comedy or Musical

  • Nebraska
  • American Hustle
  • The Wolf Of Wall Street
  • Inside Llewyn Davis
  • Her

 

Best Original Score, Motion Picture

  • Steven Price (Gravity)
  • John Williams (The Book Thief)
  • Hans Zimmer (12 Years A Slave)
  • Alex Ebert (All Is Lost)
  • Alex Heffes (Mandela: Long Walk To Freedom)

 

Best Original Song – Motion Picture

  • Atlas (The Hunger Games: Catching Fire)
  • Let It Go (Frozen)
  • Ordinary Love (Mandela: Long Walk To Freedom)
  • Please Mr. Kennedy (Inside Llewyn Davis)
  • Sweeter Than Fiction (One Chance)

 

Best Screenplay – Motion Picture

  • John Ridley (12 Years A Slave)
  • Bob Nelson (Nebraska)
  • Eric Warren Singer & David O. Russell (American Hustle)
  • Jeff Pope (Philomena)
  • Spike Jonze (Her)

 

Best Supporting Actor In A Motion Picture

  • Michael Fassbender (12 Years A Slave)
  • Jared Leto (Dallas Buyers Club)
  • Bradley Cooper (American Hustle)
  • Daniel Bruhl (Rush)
  • Barkhad Abdi (Captain Phillips)

 

Best Supporting Actor In A Series, Mini-Series or TV Movie

  • Rob Lowe (Behind The Candelabra)
  • Josh Charles (The Good Wife)
  • Aaron Paul (Breaking Bad)
  • Corey Stoll (House Of Cards)
  • Jon Voight (Ray Donovan)

 

Best Supporting Actress In A Motion Picture

  • Lupita Nyong’o (12 Years A Slave)
  • Jennifer Lawrence (American Hustle)
  • Julia Roberts (August: Osage County)
  • June Squibb (Nebraska)
  • Sally Hawkins (Blue Jasmine)

 

Best Supporting Actress In A Series, Mini-Series Or TV Movie

  • Hayden Panettiere (Nashville)
  • Jacqueline Bisset (Dancing On The Edge)
  • Janet McTeer (White Queen)
  • Monica Potter (Parenthood)
  • Sofia Vergara (Modern Family)

 

Best TV Movie or Mini-Series

  • American Horror Story: Coven
  • Behind The Candelabra
  • Dancing On The Edge
  • Top Of The Lake
  • White Queen

 

Best TV Series, Comedy

  • The Big Bang Theory
  • Modern Family
  • Girls
  • Brooklyn 99
  • Parks And Recreation

 

Best TV Series, Drama

  • Breaking Bad
  • Downtown Abbey
  • House Of Cards
  • Masters Of Sex
  • The Good Wife

The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show

Recently the hosts of ‘The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show’ came up with their favourite directors here’s who is made their lists.

ADAM ROSS’ LIST

David Fincher

  • Anthony Minghella
  • Shane Meadows
  • Todd Field
  • Bobby Farrelly
  • Peter Farrelly
  • Andrew Dominik
  • Clint Eastwood
  • Rian Johnson
  • John Hillcoat
  • Alfonso Cuaron
  • Steven Spielberg
  • Paul Greengrass
  • Ben Affleck
  • Adam McKay
  • Steve McQueen
  • Ang Lee
  • Matthew Vaughn
  • Christopher Nolan
  • Joe Carnahan
  • Derek Cianfrance
  • Todd Solondz
  • Paul Verhoeven
  • John McTiernan
  • Kathryn Bigelow
  • Peter Weir
  • Michael Mann
  • Sam Mendes
  • Robert Zemeckis
  • Ron Howard
  • Terrence Malick
  • Brian De Palma
  • Alexander Payne
  • Sam Raimi
  • David Cronenberg
  • Ridley Scott
  • Paul Thomas Anderson
  • Darren Aronofsky
  • James Cameron
  • Martin Scorsese
  • David Fincher

 

DAVID GRIFFITHS’ LIST

Steven Soderbergh

  • Rob Zombie
  • Alkinos Tsilimidos
  • Ben Affleck
  • Lars von Trier
  • Danny Boyle
  • Steven Soderbergh
  • Woody Allen
  • Martin Scorsese
  • Larry Clark
  • Gus Van Sant
  • Kelly Reichardt
  • Christopher Nolan
  • Rian Johnson
  • Joss Whedon
  • Kevin Williamson
  • Kevin Smith

 

GREG KING

Quentin Tarantino

  • Alfred Hitchcock
  • Sam Peckinpah
  • Stanley Kubrick
  • Christopher Nolan
  • David Fincher
  • Ridley Scott
  • Tony Scott
  • Woody Allen
  • James Cameron
  • Ben Affleck
  • Quentin Tarrantino
  • Clint Eastwood
  • Martin Scorsese
  • Steven Spielberg

 

NICK GARDENER’S LIST

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  • Steven Spielberg
  • James Cameron
  • Ridley Scott
  • Christopher Nolan
  • Errol Morris
  • Ben Affleck
  • Mike Leigh
  • Ang Lee
  • Richard Linklater
  • John Ford
  • Paul Thomas Anderson
  • Roman Palanski
  • Quinten Tarantino
  • David Fincher
  • Peter Weir
  • David Lynch
  • Francis Coppolla
  • Orson Welles
  • Martin Scorsese
  • Stanley Kubrick
  • Woody Allen
  • Alfred Hitchcock