Tagged: Danny Boyle

Well we’ve seen the worst… now here the best. Dave G takes a look at what his favourite films were for 2019.

  1. The Nightingale

Few films could match the power of The Nightingale this year. While described as a thriller Jennifer Kent’s film could easily been described as a Gothic horror. Brilliantly capturing the harshness of early Tasmanian settlement the film and allowing Sam Claflin to shine in the role of one the screen’s worst villains. The film shone as did its amazing star Aisling Franciosi.

  1. Ford vs Ferrari

In an era when films around fast cars usually involve epic stunts and a cast full of muscle Ford vs Ferrari did things a little differently. While the heart of the story revolved around the Shelby racing team having two of the greatest character actors of our era, Matt Damon and Christian Bale, acting opposite each other made it an audience’s delight and has rocketed it into Oscar contention.

  1. Joker

What is it about playing the Joker that seems to make an actor lift their performance? After great performances in the role by Jack Nicholson and Heath Ledger here Joaquin Phoenix stepped into this origins story and suddenly DC Comics had an Oscar worthy film on its hands… cop that Marvel.

  1. Buoyancy

From first time feature director Rodd Rathjen Buoyancy explored the practice of human slavery in a brutal way. Shot almost entirely on the water in Thailand with a very under-experienced leading man this film should have been talked about more often during the awards season. Rathjen is a filmmaker to watch in the future.

  1. Once Upon A Time In Hollywood

When Quentin Tarantino makes a film these days it is not just a release it is a cinematic event. Once again Once Upon A Time In Hollywood showed what a serious filmmaker Tarantino can be as he creatively tells a story around the notorious serial killer Charles Manson. Leonardo DiCaprio and Brad Pitt relished on a script that some thought was a little too talky.

  1. Midsommar

While I wasn’t a fan of Hereditary Midsommar is the film that has really shown me that Ari Aster is a filmmaker that really knows how to hit his mark. Thought-provoking, creative and gruesome, what else do you want from a modern day horror film?

  1. Sorry We Missed You

Nobody makes movies that critique modern day society the same way Ken Loach does. Once again Sorry We Missed You exposes what hundreds of thousands of families go through each day in a way that seems like a time capsule that can make you cry.

  1. A Bigger Jail

Brand new film from Australian director/screenwriter Matthew Victor Pastor telling the parallel story of a man living in a cuckhold relationship and a man who has recently been released from prison trying to fit into society. This is the film that should make Pastor a household name in Australian filmmaking circles.

  1. Blinded By The Light

An amazing film that mixed drama and comedy as it told the story of a young refugee coming to grips with living in Thatcher’s England. Uses the music of Bruce Springsteen as a back-drop this is one of the big surprises of 2019 and shows that Viveik Kalra is a young actor to watch.

  1. Galveston

Melanie Laurent continues to show that she is a filmmaker on the rise with the gritty crime drama Galveston. There is no way to pick where there movie is headed and it is only made better by a script that allows Ben Foster and Elle Fanning to put on two of the best acting performances of the year.

  1. Mid 90s

Jonah Hill makes his feature film directional debut with a film that Larry Clarke would have been happy with. Edgy and really captures the 90s… certainly show that Hill maybe someone to watch as a filmmaker in the future.

  1. The Public

Largely overlooked in Australia The Public saw one of the best acting/directing performances from recent years with Emilio Estevez delivering pure perfection. The films biting commentary on homelessness certainly made its audience sit up and take notice.

  1. Jo Jo Rabbit

You can’t do a comedy film about the Hitler Youth, right? Wrong. Director Taika Waititi returns to form with a film that will make you laugh and then make you cry. Sam Rockwell once again steals the show.

  1. Hotel Mumbai

Another Australian film that is perhaps unlucky not to be higher up on my list. Heart-breaking and acting packed the film captures one of India’s darkest days with an amazing acting performance from Dev Patel.

  1. A Good Woman Is Hard To Find

Great British crime thriller from director Abner Pastoll. Very reminiscent of the gangster fills of the 1980s. Has cult film written all over it and has a brilliant performance from Sarah Bolger who deserves to be a star.

  1. Marriage Story

Brilliant Netflix drama about a couple going through a divorce. Brilliant screenplay and brilliant performances by Adam Driver and Scarlett Johansson. Could it be enough to get Driver an Oscar nomination?

  1. Instant Family

One of the very few comedies to be released this year that actually had heart. Instant Family knew when to be funny and knew when to be touching.

  1. Ben Is Back

Perhaps one of the most underrated films of 2019. Ben Is Back is everything that you don’t normally expect from a Julia Roberts film – gritty and totally engrossing.

  1. The Dead Don’t Die

This film may have divided audiences but at the end of the day you had to remember that it was a film from the legendary Jim Jamusch. With that in mind the film delivered everything it should – quirky humour and unexpected turns.

  1. The Kindergarten Teacher

One of the most intriguing films of 2019. What seemed to be a heartfelt film about a teacher trying to help a gifted student had twists and turns that nobody saw coming.

  1. John Wick Chapter 3: Parabellum

Not only one of the action films of the year but one of the best action films ever made. Amazing stunts and brilliant fight sequences… surely there are no action film fans out there that didn’t love this?

  1. Defend, Protect, Conserve

One of the most important doccos made this year. Captures what really happens when Sea Shepherd goes up against the Japanese whaling fleet which made for a really interesting viewing.

  1. A Dog’s Journey

Probably one of the biggest surprises for me in 2019. This looked like it was going to be light and fluffy but instead ended up being a film with grit that explored tough topics such as family separation. If you haven’t seen it, go out and grab yourself a copy.

  1. The Guilty

The Guilty is easily one of the best foreign language films of the year. Claustrophobic and suspenseful this is another of this year’s must see films.

  1. Yesterday

Danny Boyle once again at his creative best. Funny in parts, thought provoking in others, plus who would have known that Ed Sheeran would steal the limelight the way he did?

Summary: After 20 years abroad, Mark Renton returns to Scotland and reunites with his old friends Sick Boy, Spud, and Begbie.

Year: 2017

Australian Cinema Release Date: 31st March 2017

Australian DVD Release Date: 14th June 2017

Country: United Kingdom

Director: Danny Boyle

Screenwriter: John Hodge, Irvine Welsh (novels)

Cast: John Bell (Spud aged 20), George Best (himself), Ewen Bremner (Spud), Robert Carlyle (Begbie/Begbie’s Father), Christopher Douglas (Chris The Oracle), Kyle Fitzpatrick (Fergus), Logan Gillies (Simon aged 9), Scott Greenan (Frank Jnr.), Aidan Haggarty (Spud aged 9), Hamish Haggerty (Young Renton), Charlie Hardie (Fergus aged 9), Shirley Henderson (Gail), Daniel Jackson (Young Begbie), John Kazek (Tom), Gordon Kennedy (Tulloch),  Elik Kish (Dozo), Devon Lamb (Baby Dawn), Lauren Lamb (Baby Dawn), Pauline Lynch (Lizzy), Thierry Mabonga (Security Officer Wilson), Kelly Macdonald (Diane),  James McElvar (Simon aged 20), Connor McIndoe (Renton aged 20), Ewan McGregor (Renton), Kevin McKidd (Tommy), Jonny Lee Miller (Simon), Christopher Mullen (Begbie aged 20), Anjela Nedyalkova (Veronika), Steven Robertson (Stoddart), Michael Shaw (Tommy aged 20), Ben Skelton (Renton aged 9), Daniel Smith (Begbie aged 9), Pauline Turner (June), Tom Urie (Big Bear), Bradley Welsh (Doyle), Irvine Welsh (Mikey Forrester), Elijah Wolf (Tommy aged 9)

Running Time: 117 mins

Classification: R

 

OUR T2 TRAINSPOTTING REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

Kyle McGrath’s T2 Trainspotting Review:

Over the last 10 years we’ve seen many “long time later” sequels. They’re often comedies which fall flat like Anchorman 2, Zoolander 2 or Bad Santa 2. Only earlier this week we had “XxX: The Return of Xander Cage” 12 years after the previous film in the franchise. These movies usually fail relying too much on decade old references or nostalgia alone. Rarely do we see long time later sequels to films which aren’t action or comedy which is a pity because I think it’s in these other stories where the passage of time could be much more relevant.

“T2: Trainspotting” is the 20 year later follow up to the 1996 cult hit Trainspotting. When we left Renton (Ewan McGregor) he had betrayed his so called friends Sick Boy (Johnny Lee Miller), Spud (Ewen Bremner) & the psychotic Begbie (Robert Carlyle). He had stollen the £16,000 they had just made from a drug deal he was forced into and aimed to finally remove himself from the environment which led to his heroin addiction and would consume him otherwise. Years later pushing 50 and with nowhere else to call home he has returned to make amends with his less psychotic friends and try to find some semblance of a life to live. Coincidentally Begbie has just escaped from prison and is looking to do the same, it’s only a matter of time before his 20 year grudge against Renton catches up to him.
It was several years after its release that I was finally able to watch the original Trainspotting, I do remember some of the controversy surrounding it however. It was inevitably seen by some as glamorising heroin addiction which was of course ridiculous while at the same time it wasn’t on the level of some anti-drug PSA. To me the film was more about the toxic environment which Renton inhabited than the addiction itself. The film’s most pitiful characters were those who were total slaves to their addiction while the most repulsive character in the entire story was undoubtedly Begbie who would never touch the stuff.
This new film again rather than focusing really at all on drug addiction deals more with themes of midlife crisis and a feeling of lack of achievement. The original movie (and I’ll be referring back to the original film a lot this sequel being so tied to it as it is) ended with Renton “choosing life” and possibly being able to lead a fulfilling life finally escaping the culture which was holding him down. T2 is more about the idea of what if he didn’t go on to great things? If he was middle aged and had nothing to show for it with 30-40 more years to live, what would he do with them. To say nothing of junkie Spud, pimp & blackmailing Sick Boy and the infamous Begbie dealing with similar mid life crises of their own.
It’s an interesting direction to take the story and coming back to see these characters who we remember from 2 decades ago in a completely different light really makes the movie. The movie is in a unique position to evoke legitimate feelings of nostalgia from the audience familiar with its predecessor. Something which similarly made Toy Story 3 so beloved, VERY different of a movie as that may be.
The film’s biggest problem however also stems from the time which has passed and the success of the original movie. Trainspotting really is a classic. It’s soundtrack was amazing and there was something just so real and organic about it. The actor’s chemistry with each other and Danny Boyle’s vision and style made it the cult classic it is today and was instrumental in skyrocketing almost everyone involved to stardom.
This film by comparison feels very Hollywood. It no longer has that same fresh feeling and generally seems far to much like a studio product. The comedy for example in the original was much more situational and natural, here it’s almost always: set up, punchline, pause for laughter. A bar fight between Sick Boy & Renton upon their reunion takes time out to pause and focus on an old man they’re fighting around who’s completely nonplused by the whole event. It’s a very “isn’t this funny?” moment.
Another would be Renton’s “choose life” monologue. In the original film it’s the opening and closing voice over from an omnipotent narrator. In this film it’s brought up awkwardly and somebody asks him to explain it over dinner. He then gives the same type of speech only in dialogue this time and not at one point does it feel like anything natural, made worse by the fact it’s obviously been redubbed by McGregor later on for whatever reason. These are just examples but it’s representative of how forced and scripted the whole thing felt at times.
I think like Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull the problem is even if you largely have the same crew working on your film. (Same actors, same writer, same director) the issue is that those people may be very different filmmakers than they were 20 years ago. Danny Boyle is a veteran filmmaker and Oscar winner now so the film doesn’t have that independent, rough feel of 2 decades ago.
The actors are another issue. While it seems pedantic it was hard to see them in the same believable light that I did in the first movie due to their immense success. They were unknowns in 1996, now Renton is Obi Wan Kenobi, Sick Boy stars on American television as Sherlock Holmes in Elementary and Begbie was a Bond villain. While the actors still have great chemistry it was hard to see it as believable that they’d had 20 years of doing nothing when in reality they’ve almost all had 20 years of incredible successful careers as actors perhaps with the exception of Ewen Bremner which is probably why he was most believable in the role.
Again I know “it’s called acting” but there’s a reason Mickey Rourke worked so well in The Wrestler, Eminem was amazing in 8 Mile or Michael Keaton was perfect casting for Birdman. Cast Tom Hanks in the role of an out of work actor and see how believable it is.
T2 Trainspotting is definitely better than almost every other long term sequel of recent memory and we’re not likely to see many other films like this. Sadly though it’s far from living up to being as iconic as the original film in any way and feels more like something which could have been a short movie rather than a feature film.  Still I think it’s a movie for fans alone as it doesn’t really have much going for it otherwise to make it stand up on its own.

 

 

Average Subculture Rating:  

 

 

IMDB Rating:  T2 Trainspotting (2017) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment T2 Trainspotting Reviews: N/A

 

Trailer:

T2 Trainspotting

The trailer for Danny Boyle’s highly anticipated T2: Trainspotting has just been released. This is the sequel to the cult classic Trainspotting and sees the return of key cast members including Ewan McGregor, Robert Carlyle, Jonny Lee Miller and Ewen Bremner.

It will be released in Australian cinemas on February 9th, 2017.

You can watch the T2: Trainspotting trailer below.

T2 Trainspotting

Sony Pictures Entertainment have just released the T2: Trainspotting teaser trailer. The film is directed by Danny Boyle and has been adapted from the Irvine Welsh novel, Porno, by John Hodge.

The film also sees the return of key cast members Ewan McGregor, Robert Carlyle, Jonny Lee Miller and Ewen Bremner and will be released in Australia during Febuary, 2017.

You can view the T2: Trainspotting trailer below:

 

Steve Jobs

Universal Pictures have just released these brand new Steve Jobs featurettes. Steve Jobs is directed by Danny Boyle and stars Michael Fassbender, Seth Rogen, Kate Winslet and Jeff Daniels.

Steve Jobs is released in Australian cinemas on

You can view the Steve Jobs featurettes below:

 

The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show

Recently the hosts of ‘The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show’ came up with their favourite directors here’s who is made their lists.

ADAM ROSS’ LIST

David Fincher

  • Anthony Minghella
  • Shane Meadows
  • Todd Field
  • Bobby Farrelly
  • Peter Farrelly
  • Andrew Dominik
  • Clint Eastwood
  • Rian Johnson
  • John Hillcoat
  • Alfonso Cuaron
  • Steven Spielberg
  • Paul Greengrass
  • Ben Affleck
  • Adam McKay
  • Steve McQueen
  • Ang Lee
  • Matthew Vaughn
  • Christopher Nolan
  • Joe Carnahan
  • Derek Cianfrance
  • Todd Solondz
  • Paul Verhoeven
  • John McTiernan
  • Kathryn Bigelow
  • Peter Weir
  • Michael Mann
  • Sam Mendes
  • Robert Zemeckis
  • Ron Howard
  • Terrence Malick
  • Brian De Palma
  • Alexander Payne
  • Sam Raimi
  • David Cronenberg
  • Ridley Scott
  • Paul Thomas Anderson
  • Darren Aronofsky
  • James Cameron
  • Martin Scorsese
  • David Fincher

 

DAVID GRIFFITHS’ LIST

Steven Soderbergh

  • Rob Zombie
  • Alkinos Tsilimidos
  • Ben Affleck
  • Lars von Trier
  • Danny Boyle
  • Steven Soderbergh
  • Woody Allen
  • Martin Scorsese
  • Larry Clark
  • Gus Van Sant
  • Kelly Reichardt
  • Christopher Nolan
  • Rian Johnson
  • Joss Whedon
  • Kevin Williamson
  • Kevin Smith

 

GREG KING

Quentin Tarantino

  • Alfred Hitchcock
  • Sam Peckinpah
  • Stanley Kubrick
  • Christopher Nolan
  • David Fincher
  • Ridley Scott
  • Tony Scott
  • Woody Allen
  • James Cameron
  • Ben Affleck
  • Quentin Tarrantino
  • Clint Eastwood
  • Martin Scorsese
  • Steven Spielberg

 

NICK GARDENER’S LIST

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  • Steven Spielberg
  • James Cameron
  • Ridley Scott
  • Christopher Nolan
  • Errol Morris
  • Ben Affleck
  • Mike Leigh
  • Ang Lee
  • Richard Linklater
  • John Ford
  • Paul Thomas Anderson
  • Roman Palanski
  • Quinten Tarantino
  • David Fincher
  • Peter Weir
  • David Lynch
  • Francis Coppolla
  • Orson Welles
  • Martin Scorsese
  • Stanley Kubrick
  • Woody Allen
  • Alfred Hitchcock

Trance

Summary: Fine art auctioneer Simon (McAvoy), in league with a gang led by underworld boss Franck (Cassel), plots the audacious theft of a masterpiece by Goya from a major public auction. When Simon double-crosses the gang during the robbery, Franck retaliates violently and knocks him unconscious.

In the aftermath of the heist, Simon sticks stubbornly – and perhaps shrewdly – to his claim that the violent trauma has left him with no memory of where he stashed the artwork. Unable to coerce the painting’s location from Simon, Franck and his associates reluctantly join forces with a charismatic hypnotherapist (Dawson) in a bid to get him to talk. But as they journey deeper into Simon’s jumbled psyche the boundaries between reality and hypnotic suggestion begin to blur and the stakes rise faster and far more dangerously than any of the players could have anticipated.

Year: 2013

Australian Cinema Release Date: 4th April, 2013

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: UK

Director: Danny Boyle

Screenwriter: Joe Ahearne, John Hodge

Cast: Vincent Cassel (Franck), Matt Cross (Dominic), Rosario Dawson (Elizabeth), Seelan Gunaseelan (Dr. K Raji), James McAvoy (Simon), Mark Paltimore (Francis Lemaitre), Danny Sapani (Nate), Wahab Sheikh (Riz)

Runtime: 101 mins

Classification:MA15+

Dave Griffiths’s ‘Trance’ Review: Please check Dave’s review of ‘Trance’ that is available on the Helium Entertainment Channel.

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘Trance′: Check Episode #26 of our The Good The Bad The Ugly Podcast for a more in-depth review of ‘Trance’.

Rating: 5/5

IMDB Rating: Trance (2013) on IMDb