Tagged: Danny Huston

 

Summary:A group of friends who meet regularly for game nights find themselves entangled in a real-life mystery.

Year: 2018

Australian Cinema Release Date: 22nd February 2018

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: United States

Director: John Francis Daley, Jonathan Goldstein

Screenwriter: Mark Perez

Cast: Jason Batman (Max), Kylie Bunbury (Michelle), Kyle Chandler (Brooks), Camille Chen (Dr. Chin), Michael Cyril Creighton (Bill), John Francis Daley (Carter), R.F. Daley (Tats), Abigail Ford (Mrs. Anderton), Jonathan Goldstein (Dan), Michael C. Hall (The Bulgarian), Natasha Hall (Madison), Sharon Horgan (Sarah), Malcolm X. Hughes (Not Denzel), Danny Huston (Donald Anderton), Candy Ibarra (Rachel Burns), Jessica Lee (Debbie), Daniel Lucente (Dan Steele), Curtis Lyons (Logan), Billy Magnussen (Ryan), Rachel McAdams (Annie), Joshua Mikel (Colin), Lamorne Morris (Kevin), Tony Ohara (Kramer), Olivia (Bastian), Chelsea Peretti (Glenda), Jesse Plemons (Gary), Brooke Jaye Taylor (Linda), Michael Twombley (Michael Bates), Zerrick Williams (Val)

Runtime: 100 mins

Classification: R

 

OUR GAME NIGHT REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

Dave Griffiths Review:

 

To listen to some film journalists talk the state of the comedy genre is in tatters. Apparently unfunny comedy after unfunny comedy floods our cinemas screens. The notion is ridiculous though. It seems that films like Horrible Bosses and We’re The Millers have been completely forgotten about… hell even the local comedy Swinging Safari was a lot funnier that most journos gave it credit for. Now comes Game Night a film that certainly shows that comedy is back – not only does the film’s twists and turns keep the audience guessing but it’s sassy comedy and modern edge make a film worthy of more than one viewing.

The plot of Game Night is unique in itself. Max (Jason Bateman – Arrested Development, Juno) and Annie (Rachel McAdams – The Notebook, Mean Girls) are a regular couple with a big difference – they are driven by a competitive spirit that makes their frequent games’ nights a must attend for their friends.

However their games nights are changed forever when the couple realise that their inability to conceive a child is caused by Max’s competitive streak with his rich and popular brother Brooks (Kyle Chandler – Argo, Manchester By The Sea). With Brooks coming to town and deciding to host the latest games night… a night that he says nobody will forget… Max and Annie are already on edge. To make things worse they are trying to hide the night from their creepy, ex-friend and Police Officer Gary (Jesse Plemons – Battleship, Black Mass) so he doesn’t turn up, but that all pails into insignificance when Brooks’ real life makes the night potentially deadly.

Universally panned for their work on Vacation directors John Francis Daley and Jonathan Goldstein bounce back here largely thanks to a witty script written by Mark Perez (Accepted, Herbie: Fully Loaded). While the premise of the film seems basic Perez’s screenplay makes this film stand-out. Game Night has everything that a good comedy should have – witty one-liners plus memorable characters like the dry and dull Gary and the extremely dumb himbo Ryan (Billy Magnussen – Into The Woods, The Big Short).

But Game Night also has more than that. The suspense of the plot is only enhances with a serious of twists and turns that soon has the audience realising that they can’t predict what is going to happen in the next minute let alone for the rest of the film. The fact that Perez is smart enough to have Max almost narrate what some would call film flaws with lines like ‘great two guys show up that haven’t been revealed in the plot earlier’ makes the decision to include such risky choices in the film pay off with laughter. The screenplay also gives a nod to other films, again with a smirk to the audience as Rachel McAdams declares ‘like Liam Neeson in Taken 3.’

In fact it is the chances that Game Night makes that ends up letting the film work. The decision to tone the adult humour down when compared to a film like Horrible Bosses means that this becomes the perfect date movie for both men and women while the interesting choice of cast all works. Batman and McAdams gel well as an on-screen couple while Jesse Plemons steals just about every scene he is in with some brilliant deadpan character acting. The other big surprise here is Kyle Chandler. Known more for his gritty dramatic roles in productions like Friday Night Lights Chandler here shows the world his comedic skills as he makes sure Brooks is one of those characters that the audience will love one moment and hate the next.

Game Night is one comedy that is well worth a look. Its great screenplay allows for a little more storyline and suspense then what we expect from most comedy films while Jason Bateman once again shows why he is the current king of comedy. As you sit down to watch Game Night be prepared for a wild ride with more than enough laughs to keep the comedy fans happy as well.

 

 

 

Greg King’s Review:

This enjoyable mix of action and comedy from the team behind films like Horrible Bosses is like David Fincher’s The Game crossed with Date Night.

A group of friends regularly meet every Saturday night for some old-fashioned fun, playing old school board games and charades. The games are held at the home of Max (Jason Bateman) and his wife Annie (Rachel McAdams), both very competitive gamers who met a trivia night. The players include bickering high school sweethearts Kevin (Lomorne Morris) and Michelle (Kylie Bunbury) and dim-witted ladies’ man Ryan (Billy Magnussen, from tv series Get Shorty, etc), who brings along a different shallow empty-headed date each night.

But this time, Max’s supposedly much more successful and wealthy older brother Brooks (Kyle Chandler, Emmy winner from Saturday Night Lights, etc) arrives for a surprise visit and decides to up the ante when he hosts his own game night. He has chosen an interactive “mystery” theme around the concept of a kidnapping. But things quickly go pear shaped when real life crooks invade the house, beat up Brooks, duct tape and drag him from the house. Max and the gang initially think it was all part of the game.

But when they realise that it was real, Max and his friends embark on a cross town chase to try and rescue Brooks. Their competitive spirit though means that they try to race each other to find Brooks and their efforts are driven by their natural one-upmanship. They soon discover that neither the game nor Brooks are what they seem. The chase also sees them having to find a Faberge egg, which is something of a McGuffin.

For the most part Game Night is an energetic and light-hearted action comedy with thriller elements as it mixes some car chases, fight scenes and the odd angry shot. But the plot is also very convoluted and there are a couple of last minute twists that defy credibility. The script comes from Mark Perez (the more family friendly Disney film Herbie Fully Loaded, etc). The film has been directed by John Francis Daley and Jonathan Goldstein, who are best known for writing comedies like Horrible Bosses, etc. They made their feature film directorial debut with 2015’s disappointing Vacation reboot, and here they bring their own comic sensibilities to Perez’s screenplay and make the most of the thin premise.

The film is slickly paced, and cinematographer Barry Peterson suffuses the material with a noir like palette. There are some nice visual gags as well, including establishing shots of various neighbourhoods that initially resemble a board game community.

Bateman often has a nice everyman quality that shapes his performances. Here he seems far more comfortable than in some of the crass comedies like Office Christmas Party that he has appeared in. He and McAdams develop a wonderful chemistry that lifts the film, and they play off each other well. It seems that she has allowed Bateman to lift his game. McAdams also shows a nice flair for comedy.  The cast also features Jeffrey Wright (Casino Royale, etc), and Danny Huston and Dexter star Michael C Hall in small roles as shady underworld figures.

Everyone in the cast is given their own moment to shine. But the stand out of the ensemble is Jesse Plemons (American Made, etc) who plays Gary, Max and Annie’s somewhat creepy and obsessive neighbour. Gary used to be a regular part of their game night crowd until he and his wife Debbie divorced, and he became too moody and depressed for their liking.

Game Night is uneven, but with a brisk running time of 100 minutes it never quite outstays its welcome. And it is a lot more fun than many other recent Hollywood comedies.

 

 

Nick Gardener’s Review:

The amiable if at times flat Game Night is a little like David Fincher’s The Game done in the style of contemporary comedies like Horrible Bosses. It also falls into that cinematic sub-genre the Jason Bateman movie in which Bateman plays the put-upon, every-man, nice guy schlub forced into a dangerous situation that inevitably provides some necessary jolt to his staid suburban life.

Here Bateman plays Max who, despite a comfortable life and marriage to the gorgeous Annie (Rachel McAdams), is perpetually stressed, a condition that seems to be impeding his ability to conceive a child. The source of his anxiety seems to be his arrogant Wall Street trader brother Brooks (Kyle Chandler) who has always taken sadistic delight in trouncing Max at games and competitions throughout their lives. When the obnoxious Brooks invites Max and Annie and their friends to a murder mystery party the night unexpectedly turns into a battle against kidnappers and sleaze-ball gangsters.

The film attempts to weld a typical Bateman middle class suburban rom-com to a crime thriller but the results are at best middling. Bateman’s easy charm and comic timing work about as well as they do in other films where he’s played essentially the same character and McAdams’ cheery, live-wire performance is typically fun and endearing.  Add an amusingly creepy performance from Jesse Plemons as a weird, angry cop neighbour who’s determined to inveigle himself into Max and Annie’s life and at least in its early stages, this is an enjoyably perky comedy.

As the film attempts to entangle Max and Annie in a twist-laden action/crime/ caper/ story, though, it begins to lose its appeal. The film lacks the necessary thrills, intensity and drama for this part of the movie to work. Add to this a few dud gags, predictable story threads, sub-plots about characters misfiring relationships that don’t really go anywhere and some completely unbelievable scenarios including a ludicrous sequence at a gangster’s mansion and Game Night becomes a little laboured.

Thankfully, Game Night eschews much some of the grubbiness and nastiness of contemporary raunch comedies but it doesn’t replace this with enough genuine wit, energy or clever story-telling.

 

 

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5): 

 

 

IMDB Rating:  Game Night (2018) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment Game Night Reviews: N/A

Trailer:

 

Hitchcock

Summary: HITCHCOCK is a love story about one of the most influential filmmakers of the last century, Alfred Hitchcock (Anthony Hopkins) and his wife and partner Alma Reville (Dame Helen Mirren). The film is but a snapshot of their journey through the making of Hitchcock’s seminal film ‘Psycho’.

Year: 2012

Australian Cinema Release Date: 10th January, 2012

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: United States

Director: Sacha Gervasi

Screenwriter: John J McLoughlin, Stephen Rebello (book)

Cast: Jessica Biel (Vera Miles), Gerald Casale (David Kirkpatrick), Richard Chassler (Martin Balsam), Melinda Chilton (Margo), Cinderella (Stanley), Toni Collette (Peggy Robertson), Frank Collison (Henry Gein), James D’Arcy (Anthony Perkins), Leni Ford (Lady Chicago), Spencer Garrett (George Tomasini), David Hill (Leonard J. South), Judith Hoag (Lillian), Anthony Hopkins (Alfred Hitchcock), Danny Huston (Whitfield Cook), Scarlett Johansson (Janet Leigh), Wallace Langham (Saul Bass), Spencer Leigh (Nunzio), Kai Lennox (Hilton Green), Ralph Macchio (Joseph Stefano), Craig Meier (William Russell), Helen Mirren (Alma Reville), Richard Portnow (Barney Balaban), Terry Rhoads (Jack Russell), Paul Schackman (Bernard Herrmann), Kurtwood Smith (Geoffrey Shurlock), Mark Stuhlbarg (Lew Wasserman), Tara Summers (Rita Riggs), London Vale (Myra Davis), Michael Wincott (Ed Gein), Josh Yeo (John Gavin)

Runtime: 99 mins

Classification:M

Dave Griffiths’s ‘Hitchcock’ Review: 

Over recent years ‘My Week With Marilyn’ and ‘Me And Orson Welles’ have both shown that a movie about the making of another movie can make for some great storytelling and can also allow for an actor to step up and brilliantly portray a past cinematic legend.

Now comes ‘Hitchcock’ a film that centres around the life of Alfred Hitchcock (Anthony Hopkins – 360, Thor) while he is trying to put together his greatest film of all time ‘Psycho’. Hitchcock is at a loss at what to do after the release of his film ‘North By Northwest’. Much to the surprise of his wife, Alma Reville (Helen Mirren – The Door, Arhtur) and assistant Peggy Robertson (Toni Collette – Mental, Jesus Henry Christ) instead of choosing from some of the great stories that are flying around he settles on a trashy novel called ‘Psycho’ and decides to turn it into a film.

With the studios refusing to back the film Hitchcock decides to self-fund the film, but while he is busy working with his cast which includes Janet Leigh (Scarlett Johansson – The Avengers, We Bought A Zoo), Vera Miles (Jessica Biel – Emanuel And The Truth About Fishes, Playing For Keeps) and Anthony Perkins (James D-Arcy – The Making Of A Lady, The Domino Effect) he is horrified to see how close Alma is getting to fellow writer, Whitfield Cook (Danny Huston – Stolen, TV’S Magic City).

To his credit director, Sacha Gervasi (Anvil: The Story Of Anvil) certainly doesn’t make ‘Hitchcock’ a fluff piece about the great film. Instead he shows a warts and all view of Hitchcock, a man who never paid enough attention to his wife and could be an absolute bastard to his leading ladies… what it did show however was just how determined he was to see a film through and that he was a man that certainly loved cinema.

So good is the writing of ‘Hitchcock’ that it is the kind of film that really captivates its audience despite the fact that most film fans would know that yes ‘Psycho’ did eventually make it to the cinema and became a big success. Audience members beware though you will certainly get a lot more out of the film if you know a little bit about Hitchcock’s career, otherwise things such as the crow landing on Hitchcock will have no kind of meaning at all.

Perhaps the best part of ‘Hitchcock’ though is the acting of the leads. Anthony Hopkins is brilliant as Hitchcock while he is well supported by Helen Mirren. Also impressive is Jessica Biel (who reminds audiences that she can in fact act after the woeful ‘Total Recall) and Scarlett Johansson who seem to both thoroughly enjoy getting to play a couple of screen legends.

‘Hitchcock’ is a great film that is a must see if you are a fan of Alfred Hitchcock and his film ‘Psycho’.

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘Hitchcock′: Check Episode #15 of our The Good The Bad The Ugly Podcast for a more in-depth review of ‘Les Miserables’. You can also check out our other review on Helium

Rating: 3/5

IMDB Rating: Hitchcock (2012) on IMDb

Argo

And the nominees are:

Best Motion Picture, Drama

Argo
Django Unchained
Life of Pi
Lincoln
Zero Dark Thirty

Best Motion Picture, Musical or Comedy

The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel
Les Misérables
Moonrise Kingdom
Salmon Fishing in the Yemen
Silver Linings Playbook

Best Actor in a Motion Picture, Drama

Daniel Day-Lewis, Lincoln
Richard Gere, Arbitrage
John Hawkes, The Sessions
Joaquin Phoenix, The Master
Denzel Washington, Flight

Best Actor in a Motion Picture, Musical or Comedy

Jack Black, Bernie
Bradley Cooper, Silver Linings Playbook
Hugh Jackman, Les Misérables
Ewan McGregor, Salmon Fishing in the Yemen
Bill Murray, Hyde Park on the Hudson

Best Actress in a Motion Picture, Drama

Jessica Chastain, Zero Dark Thirty
Marion Cotillard, Rust and Bone
Helen Mirren, Hitchcock
Naomi Watts, The Impossible
Rachel Weisz, The Deep Blue Sea

Best Actress in a Motion Picture, Musical or Comedy

Emily Blunt, Salmon Fishing in the Yemen
Judi Dench, The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel
Jennifer Lawrence, Silver Linings Playbook
Maggie Smith, Quartet
Meryl Streep, Hope Springs

Best Supporting Actor in a Motion Picture

Alan Arkin, Argo
Leonardo DiCaprio, Django Unchained
Philip Seymour Hoffman, The Master
Tommy Lee Jones, Lincoln
Christoph Waltz, Django Unchained

Best Supporting Actress in a Motion Picture

Amy Adams, The Master
Sally Field, Lincoln
Anne Hathaway, Les Misérables
Helen Hunt, The Sessions
Nicole Kidman, The Paperboy

Best Director

Ben Affleck, Argo
Kathryn Bigelow, Zero Dark Thirty
Ang Lee, Life of Pi
Steven Spielberg, Lincoln
Quentin Tarantino, Django Unchained

Best Screenplay, Motion Picture

Mark Boal, Zero Dark Thirty
Tony Kushner, Lincoln
David O. Russell, Silver Linings Playbook
Quentin Taratino, Django Unchained
Chris Terrio, Argo

Best Foreign-Language Film

Amour (Austria)
A Royal Affair (Denmark)
The Intouchables (France
Kon-Tiki (Norway)
Rust and Bone  (France)

Best Animated Feature Film

Brave
Frankenweenie
Hotel Transylvania
Rise of the Guardians
Wreck-It Ralph

Best Original Song, Motion Picture

“For You,” Act of Valor, Monty Powell & Keith Urban
“Not Running Anymore,” Stand Up Guys, Jon Bon Jovi
“Safe and Sound,” The Hunger Games, Taylor Swift. John Paul White, Joy Williams & T Bone Burnett
“Skyfall,” Skyfall, Adele & Paul Epworth
“Suddenly,” Les Misérables, Claude-Michel Schonberg & Alain Boublil

Best Original Score, Motion Picture

Mychael Danna, Life of Pi
Alexandre Desplat, Argo
Dario Marianelli, Anna Karenina
Tom Tykwer, Johnny Klimek, Reinhold Heil, Cloud Atlas
John Williams, Lincoln

Best TV Movie or Miniseries

Game Change
The Girl
Hatfields & McCoys
The Hour
Political Animals

Best TV Series, Drama

Boardwalk Empire
Breaking Bad
Downton Abbey
Homeland
The Newsroom

Best TV Series, Comedy

The Big Bang Theory
Episodes
Girls
Modern Family
Smash

Best Actor in a TV Series, Drama

Steve Buscemi, Boardwalk Empire
Bryan Cranston, Breaking Bad
Jeff Daniels, The Newsroom
Jon Hamm, Mad Men
Damian Lewis, Homeland

Best Actor, TV Series Comedy

Alec Baldwin, 30 Rock
Don Cheadle, House of Lies
Louis C.K., Louie
Matt LeBlanc, Episodes
Jim Parsons, The Big Bang Theory

Best Actress in a TV Series, Drama

Connie Britton, Nashville
Glenn Close, Damages
Claire Danes, Homeland
Michelle Dockery, Downton Abbey
Julianna Marguiles, The Good Wife

Best Actress in a TV Series, Comedy

Zooey Deschanel, New Girl
Julia Louis-Dreyfus, Veep
Lena Dunham, Girls
Tina Fey, 30 Rock
Amy Poehler, Parks and Recreation

Best Actor in a Miniseries or TV Movie

Kevin Costner, Hatfields & McCoys
Benedict Cumberbatch, Sherlock
Woody Harrelson, Game Change
Toby Jones, The Girl
Clive Owen, Hemingway & Gellhorn

Best Actress in a Miniseries or TV Movie

Julianne Moore, Game Change
Nicole Kidman, Hemingway & Gellhorn
Jessica Lange, American Horror Story: Asylum
Sienna Miller, The Girl
Sigourney Weaver, Political Animals

Best Supporting Actor in a Series, Mini-Series or TV Movie

Max Greenfield, New Girl
Ed Harris, Game Change
Danny Huston, Magic City
Mandy Patinkin, Homeland
Eric Stonestreet, Modern Family

Best Supporting Actress in a Series, Miniseries, or TV Movie

Hayden Panettiere, Nashville
Archie Panjabi, The Good Wife
Sarah Paulson, Game Change
Maggie Smith, Downton Abbey
Sofia Vergara, Modern Family

Cecile B. DeMille Award

Jodie Foster

Wrath Of The Titans

Summary: Perseus braves the treacherous underworld to rescue his father, Zeus, captured by his son, Ares, and brother Hades who unleash the ancient Titans upon the world.

Year: 2012

Australian Cinema Release Date: 29th March, 2012

Australian DVD Release Date: 21st August, 2012

Country: USA, Spain

Director: Jonathan Liebesman

Screenwriter: Dan Mazeau, David Johnson, Greg Berlanti (story), Beverley Cross (1981 screenplay)

Cast: John Bell (Helius), Kathryn Carpenter (Athena), Sinead Cusack (Clea), Freddy Drabble (Apollo), Ralph Fiennes (Hades), Lamberto Guerra (Timon), Jorge Guimera (Theodulus), Danny Huston (Poseidon), Lily James (Korrina), Toby Kebbell (Agenor), Asier Macazaga (Theron), Alejandro Naranjo (Mantius), Liam Neeson (Zeus), Bill Nighy (Hephaestus), Rosamund Pike (Andromeda), Edgar Ramirez (Ares), Daniel Galindo Rojas (Eustachius), Sam Worthington (Perseus)

Runtime: 99 mins

Classification:M

 OUR WRATH OF THE TITANS REVIEWS & RATINGS

Adam Ross: Stars(2)

Please check Adam’s Wrath of The Titans review of that is available on The Crat

Greg King: Stars(1.5)

Please check Greg’s Wrath of The Titans review of that is available on www.filmreviews.net.au

David Griffiths:

Dave’s review from Entertainment Scene 360

Wrath Of The Titans is very much a ‘guilty pleasure’ film. There isn’t much substance in the actual storyline and the acting standard is far from what you would describe as great, yet alone likely to ever warrant the attention of awards or nominations, yet there is something strangely alluring and enjoyable about a film that is set to become an action favourite.

If you haven’t seen Clash Of The Titans it is highly recommended you give it a watch before you sit down to watch Wrath Of The Titans as the screenwriters haven’t given great detail in setting up characterisation. In fact if you can’t remember what happened, or the status of the relationship, between Perseus (Sam Worthington) and Zeus (Liam Neeson) then you certainly need to do a Clash Of The Titans refresher because while it is mentioned a couple of times this time around (and is an important part of the story) it is never fully explained.

This time around sees Perseus trying to forget about his heritage and events of the past by living as a humble fisherman in a small village while protecting his son. It’s not only Persues’ life that has completely changed, the whole world has. No longer do regular citizens turn to the Gods in prayer or sacrifice and as a result all the Gods, even the mighty Zeus, have weakened in power.

The world is turned even darker when Zeus’s sons Ares (Edgar Ramirez) and Hades (Ralph Fiennes) join forces in a bid to release a sinister force. It is then up to Perseus to reluctantly team up with Agenor (Toby Kebbell) and Andromeda (Rosamund Pike) and try to stop the force from destroying the Earth.

Much of the fact that the film stands up is thanks to director, Jonathan Liebesman. Liebesman proved with World Invasion: Battle L.A. that he can turn an ordinary action script to a good looking flashy film on the big screen, and with Wrath Of The Titans he certainly does that. He manages to let the audience forget that there is a weak (at best) storyline and very little characterization by blowing their socks off with some amazing action sequences that for once actually allows you to keep track of who-is-who during ‘busy’ action sequences.

People planning on seeing Wrath Of The Titans in Imax 3D should be warned that some of the action scenes don’t work so well in this format. Often, the vision on the screen becomes blurred which is both annoying and distracting when you are trying to keep track of what is happening.

It is good that Liebesman brings his A-game to the film because many other people involved certainly don’t. The usually good Liam Neeson breezes his way through the film (being tied up for most of the film certainly doesn’t help his acting range), while even Sam Worthington who has proved his worth in countless Australian films as well as Hollywood blockbusters such as Man On A Ledge and Avatar seems to just cruise his way through Wrath Of The Titans. He doesn’t even bother hiding  his Australian accent which sounds extremely out of place as he roams around Ancient Greece.

Wrath Of The Titans certainly isn’t a great film. Its storyline and acting seriously lets it down but if you enjoy big blockbusters that are non-stop action you’ll still find yourself in movie nirvana.

 

Dave’s review from Buzz Magazine

Stone me, shoot me, hang me even, but I have to admit that Wrath Of The Titans did entertain me. Yes there were a more than a few things wrong with it, especially if you are watching the IMAX conversion, but I was entertained for the entire film, which I’m pretty sure was the film’s aim.

Wrath Of The Titans picks up with Perseus (Sam Worthington – Man On A Ledge, The Dark Fields) trying to put his past and heritage behind him and work as a humble fisherman while protecting his son. However, around him the world is in shambles, the Gods are almost forgotten to the point where even the once mighty Zeus (Liam Neeson – The Grey, Unknown) has been weakened due to the lack of prayer.

But then things turn ever darker when Zeus is taken captive by his son, Ares (Edgar Ramirez – Saluda Al Diablo De Mi Parte, Carlos) and brother, Hades (Ralph Fiennes – Harry Potter & The Deathly Hallows Part 2, Coriolanus) as they attempt to release a sinister force.

Perseus then realises that in order to make the world a safe place for his son he will have to reluctantly team up with Agenor (Toby Kebbell – War Horse, The Veteran) and Andromeda (Rosamund Pike – Devil You Know, The Big Year) to stop the evil plan from destroying the world.

The thing that makes Wrath Of The Titans so damn enjoyable is that director, Jonathan Liebesman (Battle L.A., The Killing Room) knows how to shoot action scenes that make the audience go wow, and with a film like Wrath Of The Titans that is all you really want. I’m willing to overlook a somewhat weak script, the fact that at times the IMAX conversion is very blurry and even the fact that Perseus has an Australian accent so thick it would make Crocodile Dundee flush because at the end of the day I wanted this film to entertain me and it did that to a T.

I can’t stress highly enough though that this isn’t a film to see at IMAX. If anything did distract me from the brilliant action sequences it was the fact that in 3D at IMAX something of them look very blurry indeed, in fact it looked the same with the glasses on or off.

When its comes to casting the guys behind Wrath Of The Titans got it right. Worthington’s accent may become annoying at times, but the guy can act and looks good when fighting his away across ancient Greece. The only annoying thing is that it seems Liam Neeson is wasted in a role that seems him strapped to giant rocks for nearly three quarters of the film.

Wrath Of The Titans delivers exactly what you expect from an action film. A basic storyline, limited acting performances and scenes that will blow you out of your seat. A visual nirvana for action films.

Stars(3)

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5): Stars(2)

IMDB Rating: Wrath of the Titans (2012) on IMDb

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘Wrath Of The Titans′: Nil.

Trailer: