Tagged: Janet McTeer

Maleficent

Summary: The “Sleeping Beauty” tale is told from the perspective of the villainous Maleficent and looks at the events that hardened her heart and drove her to curse young Princess Aurora.

Year: 2014

Australian Cinema Release Date: 29th May, 2014

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: UK, USA

Director: Robert Stromberg

Screenwriter: Linda Woolverton, Charles Perrault (story), Jacob Grimm (story), Wilhelm Grimm (story), Erdmann Penner (story), Joe Rinaldi (story), Winston Hibler (story), Bill Peet (story), Ted Sears (story), Ralph Wright (story), Milt Banta (story)

Cast: Jackson Bews (Teenage Stefan), Charlotte Chatton (Aurora), Sharlto Copley (Stefan), Kenneth Cranham (King Henry), Elle Fanning (Aurora), Michael Higgins (Young Stefan), Angelina Jolie (Maleficent), Vivienne Jolie-Pitt (Aurora 5 Years Old), Lesley Manville (Flittle), Janet McTeer (Narrator (voice)), Isabelle Molloy (Young Maleficent), Hannah New (Princess Leila), Ella Purnell (Teenage Maleficent), Sam Riley (Diaval), Imelda Staunton (Knotgrass), Juno Temple (Thistletwit), Brenton Thwaites (Prince Phillip), Jermaine Tindell (Tactus), Eleanor Worthington-Cox (Aurora 8 Years Old)

Runtime: 97 mins

Classification: M

 

 

OUR MALEFICENT REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

Nick Gardener: You can check out Nick’s Maleficent review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #81

Stars(3.5)

 

David Griffiths:

The Hollywood obsession of rebooting famous fairytales continues with Disney’s Maleficent. The trend over the last few years has resulted in some good films such as Snow White & The Huntsman but also some very ordinary films, anybody else remember Red Riding Hood? Therefore as a film fan you find yourself approaching Maleficent with a little bit of hesitance. The good news is there is no reason to because Disney have released a film that deserves two thumbs up.

Technically Maleficent isn’t a reboot it’s simply telling the ‘other side’s’ story of the famous Sleeping Beauty fairytale. The film looks at Maleficent (Angelina Jolie – Kung-Fu Panda 2, The Tourist) aka the wicked witch who cursed the young Sleeping Beauty, Aurora (Elle Fanning – Low Down, Young Ones).

In Maleficent we see what led to those actions as she is left to protect her land from the advances of the greedy King Henry (Kenneth Cranham – The Legend Of Hercules, Closed Circuit) and the pain she if left with after her lover, Stefan (Sharlto Copley – Oldboy, Open Grave) cruelly turns his back on her. We also see her team up with Diaval (Sam Riley – The Dark Valley, On The Road) to try and get revenge on all at hand but her love for Aurora prevents her from being as ghastly as she would like to.

Director Robert Stromberg, who is a first time director but has worked in visual design on some of the world’s best known films and television shows over the years, is almost asked to do the impossible here – that is to make a character who has always been the villain to the audience become someone that film fan’s will warm to. To his credit, and thanks to some help from talented screenwriter Linda Woolverton (Alice In Wonderland, The Lion King), Stromberg manages to pull of this feat wonderfully well, all while creating a film that also looks amazing as well.

Stromberg pulls off his challenge so well that as an audience member you find yourself changing sides very, very easily. Suddenly Maleficent is the good guy and King Stefan is the character that you want to see suffer. Of course knowing that this has to be watched by children means that Stromberg does also bring in some comedic relief to break up the darkness and that mainly occurs with Aurora’s minders – the bumbling fairies (or is that pixies?) Flittle (Lesley Manville – Mr. Turner, The Christmas Candle), Knotgrass (Imelda Staunton – Pride, The Pirates! Band Of Misfits) and Thistletwit (Juno Temple – Horns, Lovelace). The fact that the film manages to make these characters entertaining and not annoying is a feat upon itself.

Maleficent is a film that also looks amazing. Stromberg has created mythical characters that wouldn’t have looked out of place in something like Pan’s Labyrinth and the special effects team has come on board to make the creatures come to life and look spectacular on the big screen. The battle scenes also show that Stromberg is a very visual director and doesn’t always hold back just because he knows that little eyes are watching.

Despite its brilliance though there are a couple of annoying things that occur during Maleficent. The annoying thing is they are so small and can only be put down to lazy filmmaking and screenwriting. Firstly it is never explained why Maleficent can do great feats of magic, including make a tree grow back a branch but can’t do a spell to give herself wings again, and then there is a fact that at one moment the Narrator (Janet McTeer – Hannah Ardent, The Woman In Black) is calling Flittle, Knotgrass and Thistletwit fairies and the next moment pixies. Surely somebody must have noticed that happening during the filmmaking process somewhere along the line.

You do have to feel a little sorry for Elle Fanning in Maleficent. She seems to float along playing Aurora, and while she is one of the heroes of the film is not really given much to work with, except for the direction of ‘look cute.’ No this is very much an Angelina Jolie film and boy does she step up to the plate. Jolie delivers a full range of acting emotions and more importantly makes Maleficent a likable character while she is still really the ‘villain’ at heart. While it is difficult to compare her work here to what she has done in films such as Girl, Interrupted this is certainly one of the better films in her career. A shout out must also be paid to Sam Riley who also seems to steal a lot of the screen time that he is given.

Dark yet beautiful Maleficent is certainly one of the surprise hits of 2014. While many may have dismissed this as a family film it ends up being a brilliantly made film that once again captures that magic that Disney has been known for in the past.

Stars(4)

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5): Stars(4)

 

IMDB Rating:  Maleficent (2014) on IMDb

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘Maleficent′: For our full Maleficent review please check The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #81

Trailer:

Golden Globe Awards

The 2014 Golden Globe Award nominations are in, here they are:

 

Best Actor In A Mini-Series or TV Movie

  • Matt Damon (Behind The Candelabra)
  • Chiwetel Ejiofor (Dancing On The Edge)
  • Idris Elba (Luther)
  • Al Pacino (Phil Spector)
  • Michael Douglas (Behind The Candelabra)

 

Best Actor In A Motion Picture, Drama

  • Chiwetel Ejiorfor (12 Years A Slave)
  • Matthew McConaughey (Dallas Buyers Club)
  • Tom Hanks (Captain Phillips)
  • Robert Redford (All Is Lost)
  • Idris Elba (Mandela: Long Walk To Freedom)

 

Best Actor In A Motion Picture, Musical or Comedy

  • Bruce Dern (Nebraska)
  • Leonardo DiCaprio (The Wolf Of Wall Street)
  • Christian Bale (American Hustle)
  • Oscar Isaac (Inside Llewyn Davis)
  • Joaquin Phoenix (Her)

 

Best Actor In A TV Series, Comedy

  • Jason Bateman (Arrested Development)
  • Don Cheadle (House Of Lies)
  • Michael J. Fox (The Michael J. Fox Show)
  • Jim Parsons (The Big Bang Theory)
  • Andy Samberg (Brooklyn Nine-Nine)

 

Best Actor In A TV Series, Drama

  • Bryan Cranston (Breaking Bad)
  • Michael Sheen (Masters Of Sex)
  • Kevin Spacey (House Of Cards)
  • James Spader (The Black List)
  • Liev Schreiber (Ray Donovan)

 

Best Actress In A Mini-Series or TV Movie

  • Helena Bonham Carter (Burton And Taylor)
  • Rebecca Ferguson (White Queen)
  • Jessica Lange (American Horror Story:Coven)
  • Helen Mirren (Phil Spector)
  • Elisabeth Moss (Top Of The Lake)

 

Best Actress In A Motion Picture, Drama

  • Cate Blanchett (Blue Jasmine)
  • Sandra Bullock (Gravity)
  • Emma Thompson (Saving Mr. Banks)
  • Judi Dench (Philomena)
  • Kate Winslet (Labor Day)

 

Best Actress In A Motion Picture, Musical Or Comedy

  • Meryl Streep (August: Osage County)
  • Julia Louis-Dreyfus (Enough Said)
  • Amy Adams (American Hustle)
  • Julie Delpy (Before Midnight)
  • Greta Gerwig (Frances Ha)

 

Best Actress In A TV Series, Comedy

  • Zooey Deschanel (New Girl)
  • Lena Dunham (Girls)
  • Julia Louis-Dreyfus (Veep)
  • Amy Poehler (Parks And Recreation)
  • Edie Falco (Nurse Jackie)

 

Best Actress In A TV Series, Drama

  • Julianna Margulies (The Good Wife)
  • Kerry Washington (Scandal)
  • Tatiana Maslany (Orphan Black)
  • Robin Wright (House Of Cards)
  • Taylor Schilling (Orange Is The New Black)

 

Best Animated Feature Film

  • Frozen
  • The Croods
  • Despicable Me 2

 

Best Director – Motion Picture

  • Alfonso Cuaron (Gravity)
  • Steve McQueen (12 Years A Slave)
  • David O. Russell (American Hustle)
  • Paul Greengrass (Captain Phillips)
  • Alexander Payne (Nebraska)

 

Best Foreign Language Film

  • Blue Is The Warmest Color
  • The Past
  • The Hunt
  • The Wind Rises
  • The Great Beauty

 

Best Motion Picture, Drama

  • 12 Years A Slave
  • Gravity
  • Captain Phillips
  • Rush
  • Philomena

 

Best Motion Picture, Comedy or Musical

  • Nebraska
  • American Hustle
  • The Wolf Of Wall Street
  • Inside Llewyn Davis
  • Her

 

Best Original Score, Motion Picture

  • Steven Price (Gravity)
  • John Williams (The Book Thief)
  • Hans Zimmer (12 Years A Slave)
  • Alex Ebert (All Is Lost)
  • Alex Heffes (Mandela: Long Walk To Freedom)

 

Best Original Song – Motion Picture

  • Atlas (The Hunger Games: Catching Fire)
  • Let It Go (Frozen)
  • Ordinary Love (Mandela: Long Walk To Freedom)
  • Please Mr. Kennedy (Inside Llewyn Davis)
  • Sweeter Than Fiction (One Chance)

 

Best Screenplay – Motion Picture

  • John Ridley (12 Years A Slave)
  • Bob Nelson (Nebraska)
  • Eric Warren Singer & David O. Russell (American Hustle)
  • Jeff Pope (Philomena)
  • Spike Jonze (Her)

 

Best Supporting Actor In A Motion Picture

  • Michael Fassbender (12 Years A Slave)
  • Jared Leto (Dallas Buyers Club)
  • Bradley Cooper (American Hustle)
  • Daniel Bruhl (Rush)
  • Barkhad Abdi (Captain Phillips)

 

Best Supporting Actor In A Series, Mini-Series or TV Movie

  • Rob Lowe (Behind The Candelabra)
  • Josh Charles (The Good Wife)
  • Aaron Paul (Breaking Bad)
  • Corey Stoll (House Of Cards)
  • Jon Voight (Ray Donovan)

 

Best Supporting Actress In A Motion Picture

  • Lupita Nyong’o (12 Years A Slave)
  • Jennifer Lawrence (American Hustle)
  • Julia Roberts (August: Osage County)
  • June Squibb (Nebraska)
  • Sally Hawkins (Blue Jasmine)

 

Best Supporting Actress In A Series, Mini-Series Or TV Movie

  • Hayden Panettiere (Nashville)
  • Jacqueline Bisset (Dancing On The Edge)
  • Janet McTeer (White Queen)
  • Monica Potter (Parenthood)
  • Sofia Vergara (Modern Family)

 

Best TV Movie or Mini-Series

  • American Horror Story: Coven
  • Behind The Candelabra
  • Dancing On The Edge
  • Top Of The Lake
  • White Queen

 

Best TV Series, Comedy

  • The Big Bang Theory
  • Modern Family
  • Girls
  • Brooklyn 99
  • Parks And Recreation

 

Best TV Series, Drama

  • Breaking Bad
  • Downtown Abbey
  • House Of Cards
  • Masters Of Sex
  • The Good Wife