Tagged: Riz Ahmed

Rogue One

Summary: The Rebellion makes a risky move to steal the plans for the Death Star, setting up the epic saga to follow.

Year: 2016

Australian Cinema Release Date: 15th December 2016

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: United States

Director: Gareth Edwards

Screenwriter: Tony Gilroy, Chris Weitz, John Knoll (story), Garry Whitta (story), George Lucas (characters)

Cast: Riz Ahmed (Bodhi Rook), Jonathan Aris (Senator Jebel), Derek Arnold (Pao), Geoff Bell (2nd Lieutenant Frobb), Babou Ceesay (Lieutenant Sefla), Aidan Cook (Two Tubes), Richard Cunningham (General Ramda), Ben Daniels (General Merrick), Warwick Davis (Weeteef Cyubee), Andy de la Tour (General Hurst Romodhi), Ingvild Deila (Princess Leia), Guy Henry (Grand Moff Tarkin), Sharon Duncan-Brewster (Senator Pamlo), Fares Fares (Senator Vaspar), Beau Gadsdon (Young Jyn), Dolly Gadsdon (Young Jyn), Martin Gordon (Vanee), Michael Gould (Admiral Gorin), James Harkness (Private Basteren), Wen Jiang (Baze Malbus), Felicity Jones (Jyn Erso), James Earl Jones (Darth Vader (voice)), Valene Kane (Lyra Erso), Paul Kasey (Admiral Raddus), Nick Kellington (Bistan), Diego Luna (Cassian Andor), Daniel Mays (Tivik), Ian McElhinney (General Dodonna), Ben Mendelsohn (Orson Krennic), Mads Mikkelsen (Galen Orso), Daniel Naprous (Darth Vader), Geneveive O’Reilly (Mon Mothma), Alistair Petrie (General Draven), Tony Pitts (Captain Pterro), Duncan Pow (Sergeant Melshi), Matt Rippy (Corporal Rostock), Jack Roth (Lieutenant Adema), Michael Shaeffer (General Corssin), Jimmy Smits (Bail Organa), Stephen Stanton (Admiral Raddus (voice)), Jordan Stephens (Corporal Tonc), Dee Tails (L-1), Alan Tudyk (K-2SO), Forest Whitaker (Saw Gerrera), Spencer Wilding (Darth Vader), Rufus Wright (Lieutenant Casido), Donnie Yen (Chirrut Imwe)

Runtime: 134 mins

Classification: M

OUR ROGUE ONE: A STAR WARS STORY REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

David Griffiths:

 

Normally when a film isn’t shown to a majority of critics before its release it’s because it has turned into a disaster and the studio wants to keep it from negative reviews before it is released. Then came the news the film had been subject to a massive amount of re-shoots. With that in mind when I finally sat down to watch the film I was genuinely afraid of what I was about to watch. As it turned out I need not of worried – the lack of media screenings was because a large corporation was being stingy and whatever re-shoots occurred obviously only enhanced the film, because this is one gem of a Star Wars film.

The film takes place before the original three films in the franchise and centres around Jyn Erso (Felicity Jones – The Theory Of Everything) who as a girl watched as her mother was murdered and her scientist father, Galen (Mads Mikkelsen – Hannibal), was kidnapped by the eager Orson Krennic (Ben Mendelsohn – The Dark Knight Rises) who is determined to finish the Death Star for Darth Vader (James Earl Jones – The Lion King).

Now years later Jyn finds herself rescued by young Rebel fighter Cassian Andor (Diego Luna – Milk) and the re-programmed Imperial droid K-2SO (Alan Tudyk – Firefly) who believe she is the key to being able to get the Alliance a meeting with rebel warlord Saw Gerrera (Forest Whitaker – The Last King Of Scotland) who helped raise Jyn. That meeting soon leads to Jyn being part of a rebel outfit that also includes a blind Jedi named Chirrut (Donnie Yen – Ip Man), the rugged Baze Malbus (Wen Jiang – Devils On The Doorstep) and a former Imperial cargo pilot, Bodhi Rook (Riz Ahmed – Nightcrawler).

To be honest director Gareth Edwards’ (Monsters) handprint on Rogue One does take a little while to kick in but when it does it does it sensationally well. The opening sequences of Rogue One feel very similar to what we had already seen in The Force Awakens, but Edwards well and truly puts his stamp on the film when he has his characters escaping exploding planets and really comes to the fore when he teams up so well with cinematographer Greig Fraser (Foxcatcher) and delivers some truly memorable shots, mostly in the latter stages of the film where an epic battle takes place in a Pearl Harbour inspired location. With Rogue One Edwards goes back to that grittiness that he created with Monsters, that same grittiness that was sadly missing from Godzilla. What Edwards does here is actually a breath of fresh-air as he brings an alternative style of filmmaking to Star Wars… something I don’t believe that George Lucas would ever have been capable of doing.

That alternative style of filmmaking is also present in the film’s screenplay. While like many of the Star Wars films from the past that characters at hand are very one dimensional, and most have virtually no backstories explored at all, this is one film in the franchise that is not afraid to take risks. While some characters of old mix with the newly developed characters, a move that may turn some Star Wars’ fans offside, the film’s finale is something that turns this film on its head and separates the film from the others in the series in a brilliant way.

Together with his screenwriting team, Edwards knows how to keep an audience in the cusp of his hand throughout the film. There is rarely a let up with the suspense throughout the film, and once it is established that the filmmakers at hand are not afraid to kill any character (with some key characters dying very early on) as that suspense level is ramped right up to 11. It is things like this that make this a film that hardcore Star Wars fans are going to warm to.

The lack of characterisation doesn’t seem to hold back any of the actor’s performances in the film, though. While Felicity Jones just seems to breeze her way through her role in auto-pilot other actors step up to the fore. Diego Luna and Riz Ahmed seize their opportunities and while Mads Mikkelsen and Forest Whitaker are both under-used Ben Mendelsohn does what he does best and becomes one of the most menacing characters to grace the Star Wars universe. Of course though ever Mr Mendelsohn is out-menaced by Darth Vader when he makes his grand appearance. One actor here though does steal the show, and that is Donnie Yen as Chirrut – one of the most interesting characters to have surfaced in the modern day Star Wars films. It’s sad that Yen didn’t have more characterisation to work with because this is one character whose backstory really does deserve a film of its own.

Gareth Edwards really has delivered a worthy Star Wars film. Most people reading this will want me to compare the film to The Force Awakens but aside from their openings the two films are like chalk and cheese. The Force Awakens is a throwback to the Star Wars films of the old while Gareth Edwards brings the franchise into the 21st-century style of filmmaking with epic battle sequences in Rogue One. The film even distances itself from the movies of the past with no rolling credits at the opening and no John Williams score, which I admit I did really miss. Rogue One is one of the better films in the series, though, and we can only hope that Edwards does more in the series soon… and yes the film has an ending you will not forget for a long, long time.

Stars(4)

 

 

Adam Ross:

Stars(3)

 

 

Greg King:

 

One of the most anticipated films of the year was Rogue One, the latest stand alone spin off in the Star Wars franchise. While it doesn’t quite live up to the hype it is still a solid film that delivers plenty of action that won’t disappoint the die hard fans of the series.

This “stand alone” Star Wars film attempts to further expand on the mythology of the galaxy far, far away created by George Lucas way back in 1977. But it comes across more like Episode 3.5, as it serves as a direct prequel to the events of the original Stars Wars Episode IV: A New Hope. This latest instalment in the Star Wars saga is set before the events of Star Wars, and it deals with a group of rebels stealing the plans of the Empire’s planet killing super weapon the Death Star.
When the film opens, young Jyn Eso watches as her father Galen (Mads Mikkelsen, from the recent Doctor Strange, etc), a theoretician, is captured by Imperial storm troopers under the direction of the villainous Orson Krennic (Australian Ben Mendelsohn, from Animal Kingdom, etc), who is the architect responsible for the creation of the super weapon known as the Death Star. Years later, the adult Jyn (played by Felicity Jones, from The Theory Of Evrything, etc) gathers together a motley crew of mercenaries to mount a raid on the Empire’s headquarters and steal the plans for the Death Star. She is accompanied on the mission by Cassian Andor (Diego Luna, recently seen in Blood Father, etc), a captain with the rebel alliance with an agenda of his own; Chirrut Imwe (Hong Kong martial arts star Donnie Yen), a blind Jedi warrior; a fussy reprogrammed droid robot named K 2SO (voiced by Alan Tudyk), who brings some comic relief to the material, but whose presence will remind audiences of C3PO.

There are numerous references and ideas lifted from previous Star Wars films that will come across as familiar to fans, and there are some exciting aerial dogfights. But a lot of the key ideas here will remind fans of both A New Hope and The Empire Strikes Back in particular. Even a CGI-recreated Peter Cushing puts in a brief posthumous appearance as Grand Moff Tarkin. Somewhat disappointingly there are no light sabre duels! Also missing is John Williams’ usual iconic score, although composer Michael Giacchino’s score is bombastic and tries to replicate Williams’ theme, but he tends to overwhelm the material.

Jyn is a feisty, independent, confident and strong willed heroine in the mold as Ren, the heroine of the recent The Force Awakens, and Jones acquits herself well in the role. As Andro, Luna comes across as a pale imitation of a roguish Hans Solo-type character. Yen brings a more mystical quality to his role as the blind Jedi warrior. Mendelsohn chews the scenery here and he brings a nicely menacing quality to his role as the main villain, and he gets to go toe to toe with the series’ iconic villain Darth Vader (voiced once again by James Earl Jones) who puts in a brief appearance towards the end, which will excite the fan boys.

But much of the characterisation here is pretty slender and most of the characters are underdeveloped, and we don’t get to identify with them or feel for their fate. Forest Whitaker is wasted in a small role as rebel leader Saw Gerrera, who has practically raised Jyn since her father was taken by the Imperial forces, and Mikkelsen, who normally has a strong screen presence is likewise given little to do.

The director is Gareth Edwards, who previously gave us the low budget Monsters before being tapped to helm the big budget large scale remake/reboot of Godzilla. With this new film in the Star Wars universe he has tackled his biggest and most ambitious film to date, and he gives the material a darker feel and a grittier aesthetic. He gives the film a much darker tone, and this is not as much fun as the previous film and it moves away from the campy tone of The Force Awakens, which easily captured the spirit of the first Star Wars film. There are some superb special effects sequences, particularly with a couple of ripper outer space action scenes, and the production design in impressive.

But apparently this was also something of a troubled shoot, with veteran script writer and director Tony Gilroy (best known for writing the Bourne series of films) being brought in to reshoot some scenes and add a bit of flesh to the characters.

However, Edwards obviously loves his military hardware and he does know how to stage the big action scenes. With its epic fight between rebel forces and Imperial stormtroopers on a palm tree laden beach this has more of a feel of a war movie than other films in the franchise. The central battle sequence is reminiscent of films like Apocalypse Now and other Vietnam era films. The stormtroopers here move much more fluidly than they did in Lucas’ original film and they seem less like automatons. Cinematographer Greig Fraser (Foxcatcher, etc) does a great job of capturing the action, but he also provides some great images of the space bound action.

Overall, Rogue One is a satisfying continuation of the Star Wars universe. Although it didn’t need to be in 3D, as the process adds little.

Stars(3.5)

 

 

Harley Woods:

 

Rogue One is an example of brilliant cinematography with an alluring dark tone, which grounds it in a more realistic way than other instalments in the Star Wars universe as created by George Lucas.

We’re in a galaxy ruled by the Galactic Empire, as set-up in the beginning of the original Star Wars movie (Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope). The original story’s drama was lightened by the sense of hope and adventure, which made it lose a little of the darkness an menace of the evil horde lead by that movie’s antagonist. This element of threat has been reappraised in Rogue One and we are given a darker, sometimes feudal tale which really works for this story.

We are introduced to an array of new and exciting characters that really make this film appealing. Jyn Erso (Felicity Jones) is our protagonist who we meet as a child in the story’s opening. She escapes when her father is taken to work on completing the Empire’s first Death Star. She is found by Saw Garrera (Forest Whitaker) and told they are about to go on a “long journey”. However, we suddenly jump ahead a decade or more and we don’t get much further development. It seems the journey was ‘long’ but we missed any special moments that may have occurred, leaving one feeling as if there might have been something we really missed out on.

Of all the amazing characters – Cassian Andor (Diego Luna); Bodhi Rook (Riz Ahmed); Chirrut Imwe (Donnie Yen), an amazing and very appealing blind Jedi warrior; his companion Baze Malbus (Wen Jiang) and a delightfully snippy droid named K-2SO (Alan Tudyk) – she has the most backstory, which amounts to almost nothing. Part of her journey is reconciling her father’s part in the creation of the massive device of death, but knowing full well that he is creating a deliberate weakness in the design. A hope of reunion with her captive father is something else to drive her on, but the eventual resolution to the situation doesn’t amount to much.

Alan Tudyk as K-2SO was a real stand-out, though. His droid character is almost a deux ex machina at times, but he gives such personality in such subtle ways and small moments that he quickly becomes one of the most successful elements of the film. Chirrut Imwe was also a great character idea and one of the coolest things in the movie. I would love a spin-off tale about him and the story behind how he got to be this way and his connection with Baze Malbus.

Ben Mendelsohn’s portrayal of Orson Krennic makes for a notable Star Wars villain who makes the most of his role. This is a character who could have been utilised elsewhere in the universe to great success. His character’s need to succeed is made interesting by the fact he really just believes in his cause, but may overreach in zeal.

For long-time fans there are lots of shout-outs and cameos of characters from the original Star Wars movie. This has been done far more successfully and sparingly than in the cluttered fan-wank of Star Wars Episode VII: The Force Awakens. In fact, the saving grace is that we are not using existing characters, for the most part, but have a whole new set of people and places to learn about. Fans of the original trilogy will be excited to see a CGI inclusion of Grand Moff Tarkin, originally played by now-deceased cult legend Peter Cushing. Despite the initial thrill, I found the character had only one stance and limited facial movement which eventually left it jarring.

Despite the big draw-back of having such wonderful characters with little characterisation, the film is still appealing in the basic concept and the way it is cinematically executed. The beauty and majesty of the scenery around the planet where the final battle occurs is an amazing sight.

By the end, the majority of this film’s content seemed to be combat and space battle. The epic fight between the Empire’s star destroyers and the Rebel fleet was filmed so well it is worth a round of applause. But with scene-after-scene of gunfights, explosions and battles I would gladly have sacrificed some of this content for more character-driven content.

The eventual resolution is a dramatic and bold but a satisfying end except for the fact that building the characters further would have made the climax and triumph even more palpable.

Overall, Rogue One is a good production, which somewhat makes up for The Force Awakens, but could have been improved with more character and story elements to make it feel ‘whole’. I would happily watch this movie again.

Stars(3.5)

 

 

Nick Gardener:

 

You can hear Nick’s Rogue One: A Star Wars Story review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show

 

Stars(3.5)

 

 

Sam Gironda:

 

Rogue One: A Star Wars Story directed by Gareth Edwards and including a star studded cast including Felicity Jones (Jyn Erso), Diego Luna (Captain Cassian), Donnie Yen (Chirrut Imwe) and Forest Whitaker (Saw Gerrera) just to name a few. The film takes place after the events of Star Wars: Revenge of the Sith and before the events of Star Wars: A New Hope.
Going into this film I didn’t really have any expectation for the film to live up to. I knew that it wasn’t going to heavily involve the Jedi or the traditional path the Star Wars films normally take. The one thing I was looking forward to seeing in this film though was Darth Vader. Rogue One tells the story of the rebel alliance and there mission to recover the plans to the Death Star so that they can find a way of destroying it.
For me the first two acts of this film were very slow. It felt like it took a while for things to pick up and get interesting. The score to this film also felt a little rushed or almost incomplete. This was expected as the original composer had left production before finishing the score and the new composer had only 4 weeks to complete a fully flourished score for the finale cut of the film.
There were also a few scene in my opinion where the editing felt very poor too. There were just minor things that I had scene on screen that didn’t feel very right. Other than that I felt like all the characters were great. It was great to discover who Jyn was in the film and to see her character develop. The one thing I very much enjoyed in Rogue One was the visuals. Visually it looked incredible. While some people are complaining about certain CGI aspects when it comes to motion caption and recreating past characters, I think they did very well in what they intended to accomplish.
My favourite scenes in Rogue One were the two small scenes we had of Darth Vader. While I was very curious about his roll and execution in the film I came out very happy with how they have included him within the film. There’s a scene at the end of the film where we see a side of Darth Vader that we haven’t really seen before. It’s a very brutal side where he is just completely ruthless towards the rebels and for me that made the film.
So in conclusion I think Rogue One: A Star Wars Story was a decent film. A little slow for me in the first two acts but overall it was satisfying non the less.

 

 

Stars(3.5)

 

 

 

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5):  Stars(3.5)

 

IMDB Rating:  Rogue One: A Star Wars Story (2016) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment Rogue One: A Star Wars Story Reviews: Dave Griffiths also reviewed Rogue One: A Star Wars Story on 2UE on 15th December, 2017. You can also listen to our Rogue One: A Star Wars Story on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #206.

Trailer:

Rogue One

Are you excited about the release of Rogue One: A Star Wars Story this Thursday? If not then perhaps sit back and enjoy these cast interviews and get that excitement revving.

 

Alan Tudyk – K-2SO

 

Diego Luna – Cassian

 

Ben Mendelsohn – Krennic

 

Donnie Yen – Chirrut

 

Felicity Jones – Jyn

 

Forest Whitaker – Saw Gererra

 

Gareth Edwards – Director

 

Glyn Dillon & David Crossman – Costume Designers

 

John Knoll – Story Creator

 

Kathleen Kennedy – Lucasfilm President

 

Mads Mikkelson – Galen

 

Neil Lamont & Doug Chiang – Production Designers

 

Neal Scanlon – Creature Effects Supervisor

 

Riz Ahmed – Bodhi

Jason Bourne

Summary: Jason Bourne, now remembering who he truly is, tries to uncover hidden truths about his past.

Year: 2016

Australian Cinema Release Date: 28th July 2016

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA

Director: Paul Greengrass

Screenwriter: Paul Greengrass, Christopher Rouse, Robert Ludlam (characters)

Cast: Riz Ahmed (Aaron Kalloor), Bill Camp (Malcolm Smith), Vincent Cassel (Asset), Johnny Cicco (Bradley Samuels), Matt Damon (Jason Bourne), Ata Essandoh (Craig Jeffers), Ellie Fox (Officer Jones), Gregg Henry (Richard Webb), Tommy Lee Jones (CIA Director Robert Dewey), Vinzenz Kiefer (Christian Dassault), Stephen Kunken (Baumen), Scott Shepherd (Director NI Edwin Russell), Julia Stiles (Nicky Parsons), Alicia Vikander (Heather Lee)

Runtime: 123 mins

Classification: M

 

OUR JASON BOURNE REVIEWS & RATINGS:

 

David Griffiths:

It’s the film that hardcore Jason Bourne fans thought they would never see but yes Jason Bourne is back on the big screen. After ‘The Bourne Ultimatum’ Matt Damon was quoted a number of times that he would never play the role again, even Universal seemed sure of it as they reworked the franchise with a new character that was given to Jeremy Renner to play. But it seems when you listen to a quote, listen to it properly because what Damon said was that he would never do another Bourne film unless Paul Greengrass (‘Captain Phillips’) was in the director’s chair. When Greengrass is back and so is Damon!!!

The film begins with Jason Bourne (Matt Damon – ‘Good Will Hunting’) staying out of sight in Europe and surviving on the money that he makes as he goes around competing in various underground fighting tournaments. He is forced out of hiding though when his former ally Nicky Parsons (Julia Stiles – ‘Save The Last Dance’) hacks into the CIA’s computer network and makes some alarming discoveries about the real identity behind Jason Bourne and how his father was involved.

The hack alerts young CIA agent Heather Lee (Alicia Vikander – Ex-Machina) to what is happening and soon she finds herself working with CIA Director Robert Dewey (Tommy Lee Jones – ‘Men In Black’) to bring Bourne in. Together they bring in a brutal agent named only as Asset (Vincent Cassel – ‘Black Swan’) to put Bourne down while also trying to work out how to best deal with Social Media empire boss Aaron Kalloor (Riz Ahmed – ‘Nightcrawler’) who is threatening to expose the relationship between his social media platform and the CIA.

There is little doubt that Paul Greengrass’ latest entry into the Bourne franchise is pretty sleek but how does it hold up in the modern film environment? To be brutally honest I’ve never really seen Bourne as an elite franchise. While yes the films always look and they have shown that Matt Damon is a more than capable action star, they just don’t do enough to make themselves ‘different’ enough to really impress me. While franchises like ‘Fast & The Furious’ do whatever they can to make each film bigger and better the ‘Bourne’ franchise seems to just chug along doing the same thing each time, without doing much to change the formula along the way.

One of my criticisms levelled at this franchise in the past has been the fact that these films ride a dangerous path. The plots are never intense enough to make you marvel at the screenwriting while the action sequences are normally nothing any different to what we have seen before. Here it is obvious that they have tried to overcome these issues as the screenplay does have a bit more ‘meat’ to it while the car chase through Las Vegas resembles something of a sequence that may stick in some cinema goers minds for at least a few weeks… even though it still isn’t something as spectacular as dropping a car from a plane or jumping cars between high rise in Dubai.

What truly is remarkable here though is Greengrass’ attempt to re-capture the riots that have plagued Greece over the past few years. These sequences are absolutely brilliant and work amazingly well as a back-drop as Asset works feverishly to hunt down Parsons and Bourne. It is with sequences like these that Greengrass comes to the fore, and here he recaptures the same type of suspense that he wowed audiences with throughout ‘Captain Phillips.’ In a lot of ways these scenes are a lot better than the clichéd car chase that serves as a finale here and it will be the main thing that sticks in mind for a while to come.

We do see a vast improvement in the screenplay here as well. While characters like Asset may still be a walking cliché the sub-plot that looks at the CIA being in bed with a social media platform does raise questions such as ‘should the Government spy on us in order to keep us safe?’ while the screenplay also paints a very murky picture to what the audience should expect from Heather Lee. So often action films like this feel the need to show the audience who is good and who is bad without any grey at all. But with Lee the audience is left constantly wondering where her alliance sits. Is the just another lapdog for Dewey or does she have a soft spot for Bourne? It’s actually a relief to find a character in this genre that has the audience constantly questioning their thoughts on said character… and Bourne’s reaction to her at the end is what makes this film’s finale work despite the disappointment of the car chase.

Being written that way makes Heather a dream for a young actress to play and here Alicia Vikander doesn’t disappoint. She really is one of those actresses that just seems to shine no matter what role is thrown at her. Her recent performances in ‘Testament Of Youth’ and ‘The Danish Girl’ show what she is capable of in brilliant films, while here she follows what is written for and plays Heather as a cold, almost emotionless agent who never lets her true feelings known to anyone. While she’s not exactly working with a great script she certainly makes something of it. To her credit she holds her own as she acts alongside Tommy Lee Jones who just breezes through as the ‘bad guy’ while Matt Damon once again shows that he can still hold his own with any action star going around.

While ‘Jason Bourne’ doesn’t exactly set the world on fire or bring anything new to the action genre it is a serviceable film that certainly won’t bore its audience. Greengrass manages to make the film visually attractive but you are left wanting a big action sequence that just never eventuates (‘Star Trek Beyond’ it ain’t), still the film does more than enough to be considered ‘a thinking person’s action film.’
Stars(3)

 

 

Adam Ross

Stars(4)

 

 

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5):   Stars(3.5)

 

IMDB Rating:  Jason Bourne (2016) on IMDb

 

Other Subculture Entertainment Jason Bourne reviews: Nil.

 

Trailer:

Jupiter Ascending

We take a look at the most popular movies and television shows online over the past week.

 

  1. Jupiter Ascending (2015) – Channing Tatum, Mila Kinis, Eddie Redmayne, Sean Bean
  2. Fifty Shades Of Grey (2015) – Dakota Johnson, Jamie Dornan, Jennifer Ehle, Eloise Mumford
  3. American Sniper (2014) – Bradley Cooper, Sienne Miller, Kyle Gallner, Cole Konis
  4. Birdman (2014) – Michael Keaton, Zach Galifianakis, Edward Norton, Andrea Riseborough
  5. Games Of Thrones (2011) – Lena Headey, Peter Dinklage, Emilia Clarke, Kit Harrington
  6. Kingsman: The Secret Service (2014) – Colin Firth, Taron Egerton, Samuel L. Jackson, Michael Caine
  7. Arrow (2012) – Stephen Amell, Katie Cassidy, David Ramsey, Susanna Thompson
  8. The Walking Dead (2010) – Andrew Lincoln, Jon Bernthal, Sarah Wayne Callies, Steven Yuen
  9. The Imitation Game (2014) – Benedict Cumberbatch, Keira Knightley, Matthew Goode, Allen Leech
  10. The SpongeBob Squarepants Movie (2015) – Tom Kenny, Antonio Banderas, Bill Fagerbakke, Clancy Brown
  11. John Wick (2014) – Keanu Reeves, Michael Nyqvist, Alfie Allen, Willem Dafoe
  12. Gone Girl (2014) – Ben Affleck, Rosamund Pike, Neil Patrick Harris, Tyler Perry
  13. Whiplash (2014) – Miles Teller, J.K. Simmons, Melissa Benoist, Paul Reiser
  14. The Interview (2014) – James Franco, Seth Rogen, Randall Park, Lizzy Caplan
  15. Nightcrawler (2014) – Jake Gyllenhaal, Rene Russo, Bill Paxton, Riz Ahmed
  16. Big Hero 6 (2014) – Ryan Potter, Scot Adsit, Jamie Chung, T.J. Miller
  17. Fury (2014) – Brad Pitt, Shia LaBeouf, Logan Lerman, Michael Pena
  18. Project Almanac (2014) – Amy Landecker, Sofia Black-D’Elia, Virginia Gardner, Jonny Weston
  19. Wild Card (2015) – Jason Statham, Michael Angarano, Dominik Garcia-Lorido, Milo Ventimiglia
  20. Fantastic Four (2015) – Miles Teller, Kate Mara, Michael B. Jordan, Jamie Bell
  21. The Theory Of Everything (2014) – Eddie Redmayne, Felicity Jones, Tom Prior, Sophie Perry
  22. The Flash (2014) – Grant Gustin, Candice Patton, Danielle Panabaker, Rick Cosnett
  23. Interstellar (2014) – Matthew McConaughey, Anne Hathaway, Jessica Chastain, Mackenzie Foy
  24. Avengers: Age Of Ultron (2015) – Robert Downey Jnr., Chris Evans, Mark Ruffalo, Chris Hemsworth
  25. Jurassic World (2014) – Chris Pratt, Judy Freer, Ty Simpkins, Bryce Dallas Howard

Star Wars

We take a look at what where the most popular movies and television shows on the Web over the past week.

 

  1. Star Wars Episode VII – The Force Awakens (2015): Harrison Ford, Mark Hamill, Carrie Fisher, Adam Driver
  2. The Hunger Games: Mockingjay Part 1 (2014): Jennifer Lawrence, Josh Hutcherson, Liam Hemsworth, Woody Harrelson
  3. Interstellar (2014): Matthew McConaughey, Anne Hathaway, Jessica Chastain, Mackenzie Foy
  4. The Walking Dead (2010): Andrew Lincoln, Jon Bernthal, Sarah Wayne Callies, Steven Yuen
  5. The Hobbit: The Battle Of Five Armies (2014): Ian McKellan, Martin Freeman, Richard Armitage, Cate Blanchett
  6. Terminator Genisys (2015): Emilia Clarke, Jai Courtney, Arnold Schwarznegger, Aaron V. Williamson
  7. The Maze Runner (2014): Dylan O’Brien, Kaya Scodelario, Will Poulter, Thomas Brodie-Sangster
  8. Exodus: Gods & Kings (2014): Christian Bale, Joel Edgerton, Ben Kingsley, Sigourney Weaver
  9. Songs Of Anarchy (2008): Charlie Hunnam, Mark Boone Junior, Katey Sagal, Kim Coates
  10. Horrible Bosses 2 (2014): Jason Bateman, Jason Sudekis, Charlie Day, Jennifer Aniston
  11. Fury (2014): Brad Pitt, Shia LaBeouf, Logan Lerman, Michael Pena
  12. Guardians Of The Galaxy (2014): Chris Pratt, Vin Diesel, Bradley Cooper, Zoe Saldana
  13. Arrow (2012): Stephen Amell, Katie Cassidy, David Ramsey, Susanna Thompson
  14. American Horror Story (2011): Evan Peters, Jessica Lange, Sarah Paulson, Frances Conroy
  15. Spectre (2015): Daniel Craig, Christoph Waltz, Ralph Fiennes, Monica Bellucci
  16. Predistination (2014): Ethan Hawke, Sarah Snook, Noah Taylor, Madeline West
  17. Game Of Thrones (2011): Lena Headey, Peter Dinklage, Maisie Williams, Emilia Clarke
  18. Peter Pan Live! (2014): Allison Williams, Christian Borle, Keli O’Hara, Taylor Loudman
  19. The Flash (2014): Grant Gustin, Candice Patton, Danielle Panabaker, Rick Cosnett
  20. Nightcrawler (2014): Jake Gyllenhaal, Rene Russo, Bill Paxton, Riz Ahmed
  21. Jurassic World (2015): Chris Pratt, Judy Greer, Ty Simpkins, Bryce Dallas Howard
  22. Homeland (2011): Claire Danes, Mandy Patinkin, Damian Lewis, Morena Baccarin
  23. Penguins Of Madagascar (2014): Tom McGrath, Chris Miller, Christopher Knights, Conrad Vernon
  24. Once Upon A Time (2011): Ginnifer Goodwin, Jennifer Morrison, Lana Parrilla, Josh Dallas
  25. Big Hero 6 (2014): Ryan Potter, Scot Adsit, Jamie Chung, T.J. Miller

The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show LogoThis week on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Adam, Dave, Greg and Nick take a look at new release films ‘Fat Pizza vs Housos’, ‘Stonehearst Asylum,’ ‘Men, Women & Children,’ ‘Nightcrawler,’ ‘A Thousand Times Goodnight’  and ‘When The Queen Comes To Town′ . This episode also contains an interviews with Adam Sandler, Rosemarie DeWitt, Riz Ahmed, Angus Sampson, Paul Fench, Jason Trost, Jessica Cameron, Matthew Kennedy, Conor Sweeney, Jen Soska, Sylvia Soska, Dane Millerd, Travis Bain, Tristan Risk and Maurice Murphy.

To listen to the show you can download it for free from our Podcast Channel – Listen/Download here.

Interstellar Poster

What have been the most searched for television shows and movies on the Internet over the last week, we take a look at see.

 

  1. Interstellar (2014) – Matthew McConaughey, Anne Hathaway, Jessica Chastain, Mackenzie Foy
  2. American Horror Story (2011) – Evan Peters, Jessica Lange, Sarah Paulson, Frances Conroy
  3. The Walking Dead (2010) – Andrew Lincoln, Jon Bernthal, Sarah Wayne Callies, Steven Yeun
  4. Furious 7 (2015) – Vin Diesel, Paul Walker, Dwayne Johnson, Jason Staham
  5. Fury (2014) – Brad Pitt, Shia LaBeouf, Logan Lerman, Michael Pena
  6. Nightcrawler (2014) – Jake Gyllenhaal, Rene Russo, Bill Paxton, Riz Ahmed
  7. Avengers: Age Of Ultron (2015) – Robert Downey Jnr., Chris Evans, Mark Ruffalo, Chris Hemsworth
  8. Gone Girl (2014) – Ben Affleck, Rosamund Pike, Neil Patrick Harris, Tyler Perry
  9. Arrow (2012) – Stephen Amell, Katie Cassidy, David Ramsey, Susanna Thompson
  10. Big Hero 6 (2014)- Ryan Potter, Scott Adsit, Jamie Chung, T.J. Miller
  11. John Wick (2014) – Keanu Reeves, Michael Nyqvist, Alfie Allen, Willem Dafoe
  12. The Hunger Games: Mockingjay Part 1 (2014) – Jennifer Lawrence, Josh Hutcherson, Liam Hemsworth, Woody Harrelson
  13. Sons Of Anarchy (2008) – Katey Segal, Charlie Hunnam, Mark Boone Junior, Kim Coates
  14. Gotham (2014) – Cory Michael Smith, Ben McKenzie, Donal Logue, David Mazouz
  15. The Flash (2014) – Candice Patton, Danielle Panabaker, Grant Gustin, Rick Cosnett
  16. The Hobbit: The Battle Of Five Armies (2014) – Ian McKellan, Martin Freeman, Richard Armitage, Cate Blanchett
  17. Games Of Thrones (2011) – Lena Headey, Peter Dinklage, Maisie Williams, Emilia Clarke
  18. Ouija (2014) – Olivia Cooke, Ana Coto, Daren Kagasoff, Bianca A. Santos
  19. Dumb And Dumber 2 (2014) – Jim Carrey, Jeff Daniels, Rob Riggle, Laurie Holden
  20. Batman vs Superman: Dawn Of Justice (2016) – Amy Adams, Ben Affleck, Jena Malone, Jason Momoa
  21. The 100 (2014) – Eliza Taylor, Eli Goree, Thomas McDonnell, Bob Morley
  22. The Big Bang Theory (2007) – Johnny Galecki, Jim Parsons, Kaley Cuoco-Sweeting, Simon Helberg
  23. Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (2014) – Megan Fox, Will Arnett, William Fichtner, Noel Fisher
  24. Hercules (2014) – Dwayne Johnson, John Hurt, Ian McShane, Joseph Fiennes
  25. Once Upon A Time (2011) – Ginniger Goodwin, Jennifer Morrison, Lana Parrilla, Josh Dallas

 

Closed Circuit

Summary: A high-profile terrorism case unexpectedly binds together two ex-lovers on the defence team – testing the limits of their loyalties and placing their lives in jeopardy.

Year: 2013

Australian Cinema Release Date: 5th December, 2013

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA, UK

Director: John Crowley

Screenwriter: Steven Knight

Cast: Riz Ahmed (Nazrul Sharma), Doug Allen (Ryan), Eric Bana (Martin Rose), Barbara Bobulova (Piccola), Baris Celiloglu (Mine Kemmal), Hasancan Cifci (Emir Erdogan), Kenneth Cranham (Cameron Fischer), Neil D’Souza (Iqbal), Anne-Marie Duff (Melissa), Rebecca Hall (Claudia Simmons-Howe), Ciaran Hinds (Devlin), John Humphreys (himself), James Lowe (Simon Fellowes), Denis Moschitto (Farroukh Erdogan), Pinar Ogun (Olkay Erdogan), Jemma Powell (Elizabeth), Julia Stiles (Joanna Reece), Angus Wright (Andrew Altman), Isaac Hempstead Wright (Tom Rose)

Runtime: 96 mins

Classification:M

OUR CLOSED CIRCUIT REVIEWS & RATINGS

Adam Ross: Stars(3)

Please check Adam’s review of ‘Closed Circuit’ that is available on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep #61

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5): Stars(3)

IMDB Rating: Closed Circuit (2013) on IMDb

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘Closed Circuit′: Please check our Closed Circuit review on The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Ep 61.

Trailer:

The Reluctant Fundamentalist

Summary: Set in the years following 9/11, The Reluctant Fundamentalist follows a young Pakistani man, Changez, chasing corporate success on Wall Street. Living in the suspicious, terrorism-altered Western world, he ultimately finds himself embroiled in a conflict between his American Dream, a hostage crisis, and the enduring call of his family’s homeland.

Year: 2013

Australian Cinema Release Date: 23rd May, 2013

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA/UK/Qatar

Director: Mira Nair

Screenwriter: Ami Boghani, Mohsin Hamid, Rutvik Oza, William Wheeler

Cast: Riz Ahmed (Changez), Shabana Azmi (Ammi), Ashwath Bhatt (Junaid), Haluk Bilginer (Nazmi Kemal), Vince Canlas (Kenzaburo), Deepti Datt (Amreh), Martin Donovan (Ludlow Cooper), Nelsan Ellis (Wainwright), Rohan Gupta (Rahim), Kate Hudson (Erica), Adil Hussain (Mustafa Fazil), Liam Ireson (Chris), Sonya Jehan (Nadia),  Clayton Landey (Agent Jackson), Om Puri (Abu), Claire Roberts Lamont (June Davis), Rory McCreray (Agent Ford), Cody W. Parker (Herman), Sarah Quinn (Clea), Gary Richardson (Anse Rainier), Liev Schreiber (Bobby Lincoln), Ali Sethi (Ahmed), Meesha Shafi (Bina), Imaad Shah (Sameer), Victor Slezak (Maxwell Underwood), Chris Smith (Mike Rizzo), Kiefer Sutherland (Jim Cross)

Runtime: 126 mins

Classification:M

SUBCULTURE MEDIA/THE GOOD THE BAD THE UGLY FILM SHOW REVIEWS/RATINGS OF ‘THE RELUCTANT FUNDAMENTALIST’:

Greg King: Stars(3.5)

Please check Greg’s review of ‘The Reluctant Fundamentalist’ that is available on www.filmreviews.net.au

Average Subculture Rating (out of 5): Stars(3.5)

IMDB Rating:The Reluctant Fundamentalist (2012) on IMDb

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘The Reluctant Fundamentalist′: Check Episode #33 (available late on 23rd May) of our The Good The Bad The Ugly Podcast for a more in-depth review of ‘The Reluctant Fundamentalist’.

Trailer: