Tagged: Daniel Day Lewis

Paul Walker

Nov. 30, 2013 – that was the date when one of Hollywood’s nice guys passed away. People who knew actor, Paul Walker, described him as someone that became like a brother when he was your friend while others said he was an angel with the most beautiful smile.

Hidden underneath all of that was also a kind soul that was always eager to help out various charities. He was even on the way back from a charity event on the day that he tragically died in the car accident that claimed his life.

Now any film critic or journalist will honestly tell you that Paul Walker was no Daniel Day-Lewis or Leonardo Di Caprio, it was unlikely that he was ever going to win an Oscar for his outstanding acting performances. Instead he was the kind of actor that made enjoyable films that were fun for an audience to go and watch.

Let’s take a look at some of Paul Walker’s top films:

“Joy Ride” (2001) – “Joy Ride” or “Roadkill” (as it is known in some countries) is a hidden gem in the horror thriller genre. What was a veiled a ‘teenage thrill ride’ was actually a film that could give you goosebumps the next time a truck sails past you on the freeway. All thanks to a great little script from the legendary J.J. Abrams.

Walker plays Lewis Thomas a young student who decides to drive across country to visit his best friend (and he hopes to be soon girlfriend) Venna (Leelee Sobieski). Along the way though he has to pick up his brother, Fuller (Steve Zahn), who has once again got him into a spot of bother. It’s there that the fun (or should that be horror) starts when Fuller decides that it would be fun to get a CB Radio and play jokes on truck drivers. Soon they have a psychotic truck driver named Rusty Nail (Matthew Kimbrough/Ted Levine) coming after them as he doesn’t like being the victim of a joke.

Often these kinds of teen horrors fall flat on their face but here Abrams’ script absolutely nails it. The suspense is raised to eleven and even after watching the film a number of times there are a more than a few moments that will make you jump.

“Varsity Blues” (1999) – One of the first film roles that made people sit up and take notice of a young actor named Paul Walker was “Varsity Blues.” The film was designed to show that “Dawson’s Creek” star James Van Der Beek could also be a big screen star, but instead it was Walker who impressed those who saw the film.

Here Walker plays Lance Harbor the star quarterback of a High School football team based in Texas. Lance has everything he’s the most popular kid in school, he’s the town darling and he looks set for a college scholarship. But then everything turns bad when Coach Kilmer (Jon Voight) pushes him too far and he does a knee injury that ends his season.

Walker showed in this role that he had more than just good looks, that he actually had some acting skills, more than enough actually to see him make it in Hollywood.

“The Skulls” (2000) – Paul Walker also showed his skill and another film that was to showboat another “Dawson’s Creek” stars’ ability. With director Rob Cohen at the helm “The Skulls” was supposed to be a teen thriller led by Joshua Jackson.

Jackson played Lucas McNamara a gifted young student who joins a ‘special’ college fraternity known as The Skulls in order to make sure that he is accepted into his dream college and course – Harvard Law. Soon his friends Chloe Whitfield (Leslie Bibb) and Caleb Mandrake (Paul Walker) are also wrapped up in the deadly game that comes directly from The Skulls.

On reflection the story behind “The Skulls” doesn’t make a lot of sense, but this is still a worthy thriller that at times has you on the edge of your seat.

“The Fast And The Furious” (2001) – Twelve months after “The Skulls” Paul Walker again worked with director, Rob Cohen. This time in a film that would turn into a franchise that would change his career that would change his life and make him one of Hollywood’s most famous stars.

Walker exploded onto the scene as Agent Brian O’Conner a cop who goes undercover as a street racer in a bid to bring down a group of criminals including Dominic Toretto (Vin Diesel) and Letty (Michelle Rodriguez). But soon Brian finds himself enjoying the lifestyle and even falling in love with Dom’s sister Mia (Jordana Brewster).

This was a role that really allowed Paul Walker to shine. There were scenes of intense drama between Dom and Brian plus Walker got to indulge in some stunt work and embrace a huge love in his life… fast cars.

“Fast Five” (2011) – Ten years into the franchise and it was starting to lose its appeal a little. Paul Walker had appeared in some, Vin Diesel had appeared in some. Truth be told though the franchise was always a little on the nose when they both didn’t appear in the same film. But then came “Fast Five” the film that saw director Justin Lin turn the whole thing on its head.

Paul Walker had begun to make a name for himself as an actor that enjoyed stunts and Lin pushed him to the limits as Brian and Dom tried to outrun some new law enforcement officer, Luke Hobbs (Dwayne Johnson). The good news was that Walker was up to the challenge and he more than proved himself as an action star as well as a half-decent actor.

If you’re looking at a way to remember the fun loving Paul after his tragic death then why not give these five films a bit of spin and remember the good times?

Dane DeHaan

In acting stakes of the finds of 2013 has been of the young star Dane DeHaan. He first wowed audiences when he portrayed troubled young writer Lucien Carr opposite Daniel Radcliffe in the acclaimed film “Kill Your Darlings.” But, by far, DeHaan’s breakthrough role in 2013 was that of Trip as heavy metal artists Metallica returned to the big screen in “Metallica Through The Never.”

Dane William DeHaan was born on Feb. 6, 1986 in Allentown, Pennsylvania. His father, Jeff DeHaan, is a computer programmer and his mother, Cynthia, is an executive at Knolls Furniture. DeHaan begun his schooling at Emmaus High School (in Pennsylvania) but ended up graduating from the University of North Carolina School of the Arts.

While still at school DeHaan had a small role in the film “A.K.A.: It’s A Wiley World” and also appeared in the short film “Woodrow Wilson.” It was upon his graduation from UNCSA in 2008 that his career really took off and he soon found himself as the understudy for Haley Joel Osment in the Broadway production of “American Buffalo.”

Soon DeHaan found himself acting in another short film, “Stormy Weather,” before landing his first television role in 2008 in the popular crime series “Law & Order: Special Victim’s Unit.” From there DeHaan found himself acting in the television movies “At Risk” and “The Front” before appearing in feature film “Amigo” alongside Chris Cooper.

In 2010, DeHaan returned to the short film format in “The Layla Project” before landing two television roles that would make him a household name. He first appeared in the Gabriel Byrne led series “In Treatment” before appearing in three episodes of the hit adult vampire series “True Blood.” 2010 also saw DeHaan make a name for himself in theatre circles when he was nominated for an Obie Award for his work on the off-Broadway production of “The Aliens,” which also incidentally won the “Play Of The Year” award from “The New York Times.”

DeHaan’s string of hits on the big screen then began in 2012 when he portrayed Andrew Detmer in the camcorder science-fiction flick, “Chronicle.” The film became a hit at the box office and DeHaan soon followed it up with a role opposite Juno Temple and Kylie Minogue in “Jack And Diane.” DeHaan then starred with Tom Hardy, Shia LeBeouf and Guy Pearce in John Hillcoat’s “Lawless” before sharing the screen with Ryan Gosling in “The Place Beyond The Pines” and Daniel Day-Lewis in the Oscar-nominated “Lincoln.”

The critical success continued with “Kill Your Darlings” and Reese Witherspoon’s “Devil’s Knot” before appearing in the eagerly anticipated “Metallica Through The Never,” which was directed by Nimrod Antal. DeHaan teaming up with Metallica also saw another honor bestowed upon DeHaan when the band played under the name DeHaan at the Orion Festival

When it comes to his private life, DeHaan has always kept things out of the press; however, it is known that he began dating actress Anna Wood (whom DeHaan appeared with in “Chronicle”) in 2006 and the pair became married on June 30, 2012.

2013 may have been the year that DeHaan really made a name for himself, but cinema-goers can expect to see a lot more of this young star very soon as he is about to appear in comedy film “Life After Beth” with Aubrey Plaza and Anna Kendrick and “Life” with Robert Pattinson, before becoming the Green Goblin in “The Amazing Spider-Man 2.” Yes, it seems his star is about to rise that little bit further.

The Good The Bad The UglyIn Episode 38 of The Good The Bad The Ugly Film Show Dave, Nick and Greg took at look at what they feel are the best acting performances in films made after the year 2000.

NICK GARDENER’S LIST

Joaquin Phoenix

Viggo Mortensen – ‘A Dangerous Method

Christoph Waltz – ‘Inglorious Basterds

Kirsten Dunst – ‘Melancholia

Charlotte Gainsbourg – ‘Melancholia’

Russell Crowe – ‘A Beautiful Mind’

Tom Hardy – ‘Bronson’

Javier Bardem – ‘No Country For Old Men’

Will Ferrell – ‘Zoolander’

George Clooney – ‘The American’

Robert Downey Jnr – ‘Iron Man’

Daniel Day Lewis – ‘There Will Be Blood’, ‘Lincoln’

Paul Giamatti – ‘Sideways’

Anna Paquin – ‘Margaret’

Michael Fassbender – ‘Shame’, ‘X-Men: First Class’

Heath Ledger – ‘The Dark Knight’

Naomi Watts – ‘Mullholland Drive’

Joaquin Phoenix – ‘The Master’

 

GREG KING’S LIST

Heath Ledger

Matthew McConaughey – ‘Mud’

Heath Ledger – ‘The Dark Knight’

Anne Hathaway – “Les Miserables’

Sean Penn – ‘Mystic River’

Daniel Day Lewis – ‘Lincoln’

Christoph Waltz – ‘Inglorious Basterds’, ‘Django Unchained’

Carey Mulligan – ‘Shame’

Joseph Gordon-Levitt – ‘Mysterious Skin’, ’50/50′

Ryan Gosling – ‘Blue Valentine’, ‘The Place Beyond The Pines’, ‘Drive’

Matt Damon – ‘The Bourne Franchise’, ‘Promised Land’

 

DAVID GRIFFITHS’ LIST

Leonardo DiCaprio

Joaquin Phoenix – ‘The Master’

Michael Shannon – ‘Take Shelter’

Heath Ledger – ‘The Dark Knight’

Anne Hathaway – ‘Rachel Getting Married’

Mickey Rourke – ‘The Wrestler’

Forrest Whitaker – ‘The Last King Of Scotland’

Alan Rickman – ‘Harry Potter Franchise’

Emma Stone – ‘Easy A’

Noomi Rapace – ‘The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo’

Joseph Gordon-Levitt – ‘Mysterious Skin’, ‘Brick’

Hugo Weaving – ‘Last Ride’

Ellen Page – ‘Juno’

Christoph Waltz – ‘Django Unchained’

Leonardo DiCaprio – ‘Shutter Island’, ‘Django Unchained’, ‘The Departed’

Michelle Williams – ‘Wendy & Lucy’, ‘Blue Valentine’

Kate Winslet – ‘Little Children’, ‘The Reader’

Penelope Cruz – ‘Vicky Cristina Barcelona’

Sam Rockwell – ‘Moon’

Jessie Eisenberg – ‘The Social Network’

Justin Timberlake – ‘The Social Network’

Nicolas Cage – ‘Lord Of War’

George Clooney – ‘The Descendants’

Michael Fassbender – ‘Shame’

Jennifer Lawrence – ‘Winter’s Bone’

Matthew McConaughey – ‘Mud’

Ryan Gosling – ‘Drive’

Robert Pattinson – ‘Remember Me’

Tom Holland – ‘The Impossible’

Naomi Watts – ‘The Impossible’

Academy Awards

And the winners are:

BEST PICTURE: Argo

BEST DIRECTOR: Ang Lee (Life Of Pi)

BEST ACTOR IN A LEADING ROLE: Daniel Day Lewis (Lincoln)

BEST ACTRESS IN A LEADING ROLE: Jennifer Lawrence (Silver Linings Playbook)

BEST ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY: Django Unchained

BEST ADAPTED SCREENPLAY: Argo

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR: Christoph Waltz (Django Unchained)

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS: Anne Hathaway (Les Miserables)

BEST FOREIGN FEATURE: Amour

BEST ANIMATED FEATURE: Brave

BEST PRODUCTION DESIGN: Rick Carter, Jim Erickson (Lincoln)

BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY: Life Of Pi

BEST SOUND MIXING: Andy Nelson, Mark Paterson, Simon Hayes (Les Miserables)

BEST SOUND EDITING: Per Hallberg, Karen Baker Landers (Skyfall)/Paul N.J. Ottosson (Zero Dark Thirty)

BEST ORIGINAL SCORE: Mychael Danna (Life Of Pi)

BEST ORIGINAL SONG: Skyfall – Adele (Skyfall)

BEST COSTUME DESIGN: Anna Karenina

BEST DOCUMENTARY FEATURE: Searching For Sugarman

BEST DOCUMENTARY SHORT: Incocente

BEST FILM EDITING: Argo

BEST MAKEUP AND HAIRSTYLING: Lisa Westcott/Julie Dartnell (Les Miserables)

BEST ANIMATED SHORT FILM: Paperman

BEST LIVE ACTION SHORT FILM: Curfew

BEST VISUAL EFFECTS: Life Of Pi

Lincoln

Summary: Steven Spielberg directs two-time Academy Award® winner Daniel Day-Lewis in LINCOLN, a revealing drama that focuses on the 16th President’s tumultuous final months in office. In a nation divided by war and the strong winds of change, Lincoln pursues a course of action designed to end the war, unite the country and abolish slavery. With the moral courage and fierce determination to succeed, his choices during this critical moment will change the fate of generations to come.

Year: 2013

Australian Cinema Release Date: 31st January, 2013

Australian DVD Release Date: TBA

Country: USA

Director: Steven Spielberg

Screenwriter: Tony Kushner, Doris Kearns Goodwin (book)

Cast: Don Henderson Baker (Walter Appleton), Jim Batchelder (Howard Guillefoyle), Thomas K. Belgrey (Arthur Bentleigh), John Bellemer (Faust), Christopher Boyer (General Robert E. Lee), Leon Addison Brown (Harold Green), Bill Camp (Mr. Jolly), Joseph Carlson (Jospeh Marstern), Christopher Cartmill (Leonard Grover), David Costabile (James Ashley), Joseph Cross (John Hay), Daniel Day-Lewis (Abraham Lincoln), Joe Dellinger (Nelson Merrick), Colman Domingo (Private Harold Green), Adam Driver (Samuel Beckwith), Mary Dunleavy (Marguerite), Wayne Duvall (Senator Bluff Wade), Ralph D. Edlow (Leo), Chase Edmunds (Willie Lincoln), James ‘Ike’ Eichling (William Dennison), Sally Field (Mary Todd Lincoln), Ford Flannagan (Tom Pendel), Todd Fletcher (Walter H. Washburn), Walton Goggins (Clay Hawkins), Michael Goodwin (Chilton A. Elliott), Joseph Gordon-Levitt (Robert Lincoln), Dave Hager (Captain Nathan Saunders), Jackie Early Haley (Alexander Stephens), Jared Harris (Ulysses S. Grant), John Hawkes (Robert Latham), Stephen Henderson (William Slade), Grainger Hines (Gideon Welles), Hal Holbrook (Preston Blair), Jamie Horton (Giles Stuart), Gregory Hosaflook (John F. McKenzie), John Hutton (Senator Charles Summer), Gregory Itzen (Judge John A. Campbell), Byron Jennings (Montgomery Blair), Ted Johnson (John Ellis), Tommy Lee Jones (Thaddeus Stevens), William Kaffenberger (John A. Casson), Michael Stanton Kennedy (Hiram Price), Joe Kerkes (Andrew E. Finck), Clarence Key (Brigadier General Seth Williams), Charles Kinney (Myer Strauss), Ken Lambert (Augustus Benjamin), John Lescault (Gustavus Fox), C. Brandon Marshall (Rufus Warren), Elizabeth Marvel (Mrs. Jolly), Dakin Matthews (John Usher), Edward McDonald (Daniel G. Stuart), Bruce McGill (Edwin Stanton), Boris McGiver (Alexander Coffroth), Gulliver McGrath (Tad Lincoln), Gannon McHale (Aaron Haddam), Peter McRobbie (George Pendleton), S. Epatha Merkerson (Lydia Smith), John Moon (Edwin LeClerk), Tim Blake Nelson (Richard Schell), Kevin Lawrence O’Donnell (Charles Hanson), David Oyelowo (Corporal Ira Clark), Matthew Pabo (Lee Pace (Fernando Wood), Robert Peters (Jacob Graylor), Bill Raymond (Schuyler Colfax), Gloria Reuben (Elizabeth Keckley), Michael Ruff (Harold Hollister), Robert Ruffin (Major Thompson Eckert), Raynor Scheine (Josiah S. ‘Beanpole’ Burton), Drew Sease (David Homer Bates), Robert Shepherd (Dr. Joseph K. Barnes),  Michael Shiflett (Senator R.M.T. Hunter), Walt Smith (William Fessenden), James Spader (W.N. Bilbo), Stephen Spinella (Asa Vintner Lettor), David Straithairn (William Seward), Jeremy Strong (John Nicolay), Michael Stuhlbarg (George Yeaman), Richard Topol (James Speed), Asa-Luke Twocrow (Ely Parker), Larry Van Hoose (Avon Hanready), Richard Warner (Homer Benson), David Warshofsky (William Hutton), Christopher Evan Welch (Edward McPherson), Armistead Wellford (Nehemiah Cleary), Charmaine White (Minerva), Julie White (Elizabeth Blair Lee), Scott Wichman (Charles Benjamin)

Runtime: 153 mins

Classification:M

Dave Griffiths’s ‘Lincoln’ Review: 

Director Steven Spielberg (War Horse, The Adventures Of Tintin) is not normally known for his dialogue filled dramas, sure he loves to incorporate themes into his films but normally those films are also full of well-shot action sequences. But ‘Lincoln’ is a little different, ‘Lincoln’ sees Spielberg delve into a historic dialogue driven film that may be enjoyable to watch but certainly could have used a little bit more action.

Taken from a novel by Doris Kearns Goodwin ‘Lincoln’ sees President Abraham Lincoln (Daniel Day-Lewis – Nine, There Will Be Blood) ruling over a country that is self-destructing amidst a horrendous Civil War. Determined to see the Way bring some good to the country Lincoln decides that it is time to change the 13th Amendment and see slavery abolished.

But in order to do that Lincoln has to go against the suggestions of his right-hand man, William Seaward (David Strathairn – The Bourne Legacy, No God No Master) and begin to lobby other congress members (such as Clay Hawkins (Walton Goggins – Officer Down, Django Unchained)) so they will change their stance on slavery in The South.

Aside from that Lincoln also faces crisis on the family front with his wife Mary Todd Lincoln (Sally Field – The Amazing Spider-Man, TV’S Brothers & Sisters) struggling mentally after the loss of their child and his eldest son Robert Lincoln (Joseph Gordon-Levitt – Looper, The Dark Knight Rises) determined to be able to fight in the Way even if it means going against his father’s wishes.

The fact that Spielberg has gone for a full dialogue and drama onslaught does have it pros and cons. While it gives actor Daniel Day-Lewis the opportunity to pull off one of Hollywood’s best ever performances it also holds back the film. It becomes painfully obvious that screenwriter Tony Kushner comes from a theatre background when you realise that despite the film is set during the Civil War you hear more actors talking about the war then what you see of footage from it… it’s almost like Kushner has forgotten that in film it is okay to spend a little bit of cash and actually film something rather than just talk about.

Spielberg seems to also surprisingly under use some of his cast members. While Walton Goggins gets to showcase the acting ability that made him such a big hit on ‘The Shield’ and Tommy Lee Jones puts in one of his finest efforts for years, poor Joseph Gordon-Levitt is horribly under used for an actor of his talents while Sally Field is horribly miscast as Mary Todd Lincoln.

If you enjoy historically accurate dramatic films then you will enjoy ‘Lincoln’ but if you enjoy films with a little bit of action then this certainly isn’t the film for you.

Other Subculture Media Reviews of ‘Lincoln′: Check Episode #19 of our The Good The Bad The Ugly Podcast for a more in-depth review of ‘Lincoln’. Dave’s other review of ‘Lincoln’ can be found on the Helium Entertainment Channel

Rating: 3/5

IMDB Rating:Lincoln (2012) on IMDb

The Sapphires

The winners of the 2nd annual Australian Academy of Cinema and Televsion Arts Awards were last night announced at a star studded ceremony in Sydney last night. The night was hosted by Russell Crowe and the Awards were announced by the likes of Cate Blanchett, Geoffrey Rush, Nicole Kidman, Stephen Curry and Ricky Ponting.

Here is the full list of winners.

FILM

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST VISUAL EFFECTS
• Iron Sky. Samuli Torssonen, Jussi Lehtiniemi, Juuso Kaari, Kelly Myers.

AACTA RAYMOND LONGFORD AWARD
• Al Clark

TELEVISION
AACTA AWARD FOR BEST CHILDREN’S TELEVISION SERIES
• The Adventures of Figaro Pho. Dan Fill, Frank Verheggen, David Webster. ABC3

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST TELEVISION COMEDY SERIES
• Lowdown – Season 2. Nicole Minchin, Amanda Brotchie, Adam Zwar. ABC1

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST LIGHT ENTERTAINMENT TELEVISION SERIES
• Agony Aunts. Adam Zwar, Nicole Minchin. ABC1

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST PERFORMANCE IN A TELEVISION COMEDY
• Patrick Brammall. A Moody Christmas. ABC1

SHORT FILM
AACTA AWARD FOR BEST SHORT ANIMATION
• The Hunter. Marieka Walsh.

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST SHORT FICTION FILM
• Julian. Robert Jago, Matthew Moore.

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST SCREENPLAY IN A SHORT FILM
• Transmission. Zak Hilditch.

DOCUMENTARY

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST FEATURE LENGTH DOCUMENTARY
• Storm Surfers 3D. Ellenor Cox, Marcus Gillezeau.

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST DOCUMENTARY UNDER ONE HOUR
• Then The Wind Changed. Jeni McMahon, Celeste Geer. ABC1

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST DOCUMENTARY SERIES
• Go Back To Where You Came From. Rick McPhee, Ivan O’Mahoney. SBS

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST DIRECTION IN A DOCUMENTARY
• Fighting Fear. Macario De Souza. FOXTEL – Movie Network

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY IN A DOCUMENTARY
• Fighting Fear. Tim Bonython, Chris Bryan, Macario De Souza, Lee Kelly. FOXTEL – Movie Network

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST EDITING IN A DOCUMENTARY
• Once Upon A Time In Cabramatta – Episode 1. Sam Wilson. SBS

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST SOUND IN A DOCUMENTARY
• Dr Sarmast’s Music School. Dale Cornelius, Livia Ruzic, Keith Thomas. ABC1

FEATURE FILM
AACTA AWARD FOR BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY
• The Sapphires. Warwick Thornton.

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST EDITING
• The Sapphires. Dany Cooper ASE.

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST SOUND
• The Sapphires. Andrew Plain, Bry Jones, Pete Smith, Ben Osmo, John Simpson.

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST ORIGINAL MUSIC SCORE
• Not Suitable For Children. Matteo Zingales, Jono Ma.

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST PRODUCTION DESIGN
• The Sapphires. Melinda Doring.

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST COSTUME DESIGN
• The Sapphires. Tess Schofield.

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST YOUNG ACTOR
• Saskia Rosendahl. Lore.

NEWS.COM.AU AUDIENCE CHOICE AWARD FOR MOST MEMORABLE SCREEN MOMENT
• The Sapphires.

BYRON KENNEDY AWARD
• Sarah Watt

TELEVISION
AACTA AWARD FOR BEST REALITY TELEVISION SERIES
• The Amazing Race Australia. Michael McKay, Trent Chapman, David Gardner, Matthew Kowald. Seven Network

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST TELEVISION DRAMA SERIES
• Puberty Blues. John Edwards, Imogen Banks. Network Ten

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST TELEFEATURE OR MINI SERIES
• Howzat! Kerry Packer’s War. John Edwards, Mimi Butler. Nine Network

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST DIRECTION IN TELEVISION
• Jack Irish: Bad Debts. Jeffrey Walker. ABC1

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST SCREENPLAY IN TELEVISION
• Redfern Now – Episode 6 ‘Pretty Boy Blue’. Steven McGregor. ABC1

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST LEAD ACTOR IN A TELEVISION DRAMA
• Richard Roxburgh. Rake – Season 2. ABC1

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST LEAD ACTRESS IN A TELEVISION DRAMA
• Leah Purcell. Redfern Now – Episode 1 ‘Family’. ABC1

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST GUEST OR SUPPORTING ACTOR IN A TELEVISION DRAMA
• Aaron Jeffery. Underbelly Badness – Episode 3 ‘The Loaded Dog’. Nine Network

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST GUEST OR SUPPORTING ACTRESS IN A TELEVISION DRAMA
• Mandy McElhinney. Howzat! Kerry Packer’s War – Part 2. Nine Network

FEATURE FILM
AACTA AWARD FOR BEST FILM
• The Sapphires. Rosemary Blight, Kylie du Fresne.

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST DIRECTION
• The Sapphires. Wayne Blair.

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY
• Wish You Were Here. Kieran Darcy-Smith, Felicity Price.

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST ADAPTED SCREENPLAY
• The Sapphires. Keith Thompson, Tony Briggs.

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST LEAD ACTOR
• Chris O’Dowd. The Sapphires.

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST LEAD ACTRESS
• Deborah Mailman. The Sapphires.

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR
• Antony Starr. Wish You Were Here.

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS
• Jessica Mauboy. The Sapphires.
2nd AACTA Awards_Winners and Nominees_Luncheon, Ceremony & International Page 10 of 10

AACTA INTERNATIONAL AWARD FOR BEST SCREENPLAY
• Django Unchained. Quentin Tarantino.

AACTA INTERNATIONAL AWARD FOR BEST DIRECTION
• Silver Linings Playbook. David O. Russell.

AACTA INTERNATIONAL AWARD FOR BEST ACTOR
• Daniel Day-Lewis Lincoln.

AACTA INTERNATIONAL AWARD FOR BEST ACTRESS
• Jennifer Lawrence. Silver Linings Playbook.

AACTA INTERNATIONAL AWARD FOR BEST FILM
• Silver Linings Playbook. Donna Gigliotti, Bruce Cohen, Jonathan Gordon.

Argo

And the winners are:

Best motion picture

Argo

Best Actor in a motion picture

Daniel Day-Lewis, Lincoln

Best Actress in a motion picture

Jessica Chastain, Zero Dark Thirty

Best comedy or musical

Les Miserables

Best Actor in a comedy or musical

Hugh Jackman, Les Miserables

Best TV series, comedy or musical

Girls

Best Director, Motion Picture

Ben Affleck, Argo

Cecile B. DeMille Award for outstanding contribution to the world of entertainment

Jodie Foster

Best Actress in a TV series comedy

Lena Dunham, Girls

Best foreign film

Amour (Austria)

Best actress TV series drama

Claire Danes – Homeland

Best animated film

Brave

Best screenplay

Quentin Tarantino – Django Unchained

Best Supporting Actress in a motion picture

Anne Hathaway for Les Miserables

Best Supporting Actor in a motion picture

Ed Harris – Game Change

Best Actress in a motion picture comedy or musical

Jennifer Lawrence – Silver Linings Playbook

Best Actor in a mini-series or telemovie

Kevin Costner – Hatfields & McCoys

Best TV series

Homeland

Best Actor TV comedy or musical

Don Cheadle – House of Lies

Best Original Song – Motion Picture

Adele – Skyfall theme

Best Actor in a television series

Damian Lewis – Homeland

Best Supporting Actor – Movies

Christoph Waltz  –Django Unchained

Supporting Actress, TV Series, Miniseries or Movie

Maggie Smith- Downton Abbey

Best Miniseries or Movie

Game Change

Best Actress, Miniseries or Movie

Julianne Moore – Game Change

Best Original Score

Michael Danna – Life of Pi

Argo

The 2012 Academy Award Nominations are in… here they are:

Best Picture:

“Beasts of the Southern Wild”

“Silver Linings Playbook”

“Zero Dark Thirty”

“Lincoln”

“Les Miserables”

“Life of Pi”

“Amour”

“Django Unchained”

“Argo”

Best Supporting Actor:

Christoph Waltz, “Django Unchained”

Philip Seymour Hoffman, “The Master”

Robert De Niro, “Silver Linings Playbook”

Alan Arkin, “Argo”

Tommy Lee Jones, “Lincoln”

Best Supporting Actress:

Sally Field, “Lincoln”

Anne Hathaway, “Les Miserables”

Jacki Weaver, “Silver Linings Playbook”

Helen Hunt, “The Sessions”

Amy Adams, “The Master”

Best Director:

David O. Russell, “Silver Linings Playbook”

Ang Lee, “Life of Pi”

Steven Spielberg, “Lincoln”

Michael Haneke, “Amour”

Benh Zeitlin, “Beasts of the Southern Wild”

Best Actor:

Daniel Day Lewis, “Lincoln”

Denzel Washington, “Flight”

Hugh Jackman, “Les Miserables”

Bradley Cooper, “Silver Linings Playbook”

Joaquin Phoenix, “The Master”

Best Actress:

Naomi Watts, “The Impossible”

Jessica Chastain, “Zero Dark Thirty”

Jennifer Lawrence, “Silver Linings Playbook”

Emmanuelle Riva, “Amour”

Quvenzhané Wallis, “Beasts of the Southern Wild”

Best Original Screenplay:

“Zero Dark Thirty”

“Django Unchained”

“Moonrise Kingdom”

“Amour”

“Flight”

Best Adapted Screenplay:

“Lincoln”

“Silver Linings Playbook”

“Argo”

“Life of Pi”

“Beasts of the Southern Wild”

Best Animated Feature:

“Frankenweenie”

“The Pirates! Band of Misfits”

“Wreck-It Ralph”

“Paranorman”

“Brave”

Best Foreign Feature:

“Amour”

“A Royal Affair”

“Kon-Tiki”

“No”

“War Witch”

Best Visual Effects:

“Life of Pi”

“The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey”

“The Avengers”

“Prometheus”

“Snow White and the Huntsman”

Best Cinematography:

“Skyfall”

“Anna Karenina”

“Django Unchained”

“Life of Pi”

“Lincoln”

Best Costume Design:

“Anna Karenina”

“Les Miserables”

“Lincoln”

“Mirror Mirror”

“Snow White and the Huntsman”

Best Documentary Feature:

“Searching for Sugar Man”

“How to Survive a Plague”

“The Gatekeepers”

“5 Broken Cameras”

“The Invisible War”

Best Documentary Short:

“Open Heart”

“Inocente”

“Redemption”

“Kings Point”

“Mondays at Racine”

Best Film Editing:

“Lincoln”

“Silver Linings Playbook”

“Life of Pi”

“Argo”

“Zero Dark Thirty”

Best Makeup and Hairstyling:

“Hitchcock”

“The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey”

“Les Miserables”

Best Music (Original Score):

“Anna Karenina”

“Argo”

“Life of Pi”

“Lincoln”

“Skyfall”

Best Music (Original Song):

“Before My Time” from “Chasing Ice”

“Everybody Needs A Best Friend” from “Ted”

“Pi’s Lullaby” from “Life of Pi”

“Skyfall” from “Skyfall”

“Suddenly” from “Les Misérables”

Best Production Design:

“Anna Karenina”

“The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey”

“Les Misérables”

“Life of Pi”

“Lincoln”

Best Short Film, Animated:

Adam and Dog”

“Fresh Guacamole”

“Head over Heels”

“Maggie Simpson in ‘The Longest Daycare’”

“Paperman”

Best Short Film, Live Action:

“Asad”

“Buzkashi Boys”

“Curfew”

“Death of a Shadow (Dood van een Schaduw)”

“Henry”

Best Sound Editing:

“Argo”

“Django Unchained”

“Life of Pi”

“Skyfall”

“Zero Dark Thirty”

Best Sound Mixing:

“Argo”

“Les Misérables”

“Life of Pi”

“Lincoln”

“Skyfall”

Argo

And the nominees are:

Best Motion Picture, Drama

Argo
Django Unchained
Life of Pi
Lincoln
Zero Dark Thirty

Best Motion Picture, Musical or Comedy

The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel
Les Misérables
Moonrise Kingdom
Salmon Fishing in the Yemen
Silver Linings Playbook

Best Actor in a Motion Picture, Drama

Daniel Day-Lewis, Lincoln
Richard Gere, Arbitrage
John Hawkes, The Sessions
Joaquin Phoenix, The Master
Denzel Washington, Flight

Best Actor in a Motion Picture, Musical or Comedy

Jack Black, Bernie
Bradley Cooper, Silver Linings Playbook
Hugh Jackman, Les Misérables
Ewan McGregor, Salmon Fishing in the Yemen
Bill Murray, Hyde Park on the Hudson

Best Actress in a Motion Picture, Drama

Jessica Chastain, Zero Dark Thirty
Marion Cotillard, Rust and Bone
Helen Mirren, Hitchcock
Naomi Watts, The Impossible
Rachel Weisz, The Deep Blue Sea

Best Actress in a Motion Picture, Musical or Comedy

Emily Blunt, Salmon Fishing in the Yemen
Judi Dench, The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel
Jennifer Lawrence, Silver Linings Playbook
Maggie Smith, Quartet
Meryl Streep, Hope Springs

Best Supporting Actor in a Motion Picture

Alan Arkin, Argo
Leonardo DiCaprio, Django Unchained
Philip Seymour Hoffman, The Master
Tommy Lee Jones, Lincoln
Christoph Waltz, Django Unchained

Best Supporting Actress in a Motion Picture

Amy Adams, The Master
Sally Field, Lincoln
Anne Hathaway, Les Misérables
Helen Hunt, The Sessions
Nicole Kidman, The Paperboy

Best Director

Ben Affleck, Argo
Kathryn Bigelow, Zero Dark Thirty
Ang Lee, Life of Pi
Steven Spielberg, Lincoln
Quentin Tarantino, Django Unchained

Best Screenplay, Motion Picture

Mark Boal, Zero Dark Thirty
Tony Kushner, Lincoln
David O. Russell, Silver Linings Playbook
Quentin Taratino, Django Unchained
Chris Terrio, Argo

Best Foreign-Language Film

Amour (Austria)
A Royal Affair (Denmark)
The Intouchables (France
Kon-Tiki (Norway)
Rust and Bone  (France)

Best Animated Feature Film

Brave
Frankenweenie
Hotel Transylvania
Rise of the Guardians
Wreck-It Ralph

Best Original Song, Motion Picture

“For You,” Act of Valor, Monty Powell & Keith Urban
“Not Running Anymore,” Stand Up Guys, Jon Bon Jovi
“Safe and Sound,” The Hunger Games, Taylor Swift. John Paul White, Joy Williams & T Bone Burnett
“Skyfall,” Skyfall, Adele & Paul Epworth
“Suddenly,” Les Misérables, Claude-Michel Schonberg & Alain Boublil

Best Original Score, Motion Picture

Mychael Danna, Life of Pi
Alexandre Desplat, Argo
Dario Marianelli, Anna Karenina
Tom Tykwer, Johnny Klimek, Reinhold Heil, Cloud Atlas
John Williams, Lincoln

Best TV Movie or Miniseries

Game Change
The Girl
Hatfields & McCoys
The Hour
Political Animals

Best TV Series, Drama

Boardwalk Empire
Breaking Bad
Downton Abbey
Homeland
The Newsroom

Best TV Series, Comedy

The Big Bang Theory
Episodes
Girls
Modern Family
Smash

Best Actor in a TV Series, Drama

Steve Buscemi, Boardwalk Empire
Bryan Cranston, Breaking Bad
Jeff Daniels, The Newsroom
Jon Hamm, Mad Men
Damian Lewis, Homeland

Best Actor, TV Series Comedy

Alec Baldwin, 30 Rock
Don Cheadle, House of Lies
Louis C.K., Louie
Matt LeBlanc, Episodes
Jim Parsons, The Big Bang Theory

Best Actress in a TV Series, Drama

Connie Britton, Nashville
Glenn Close, Damages
Claire Danes, Homeland
Michelle Dockery, Downton Abbey
Julianna Marguiles, The Good Wife

Best Actress in a TV Series, Comedy

Zooey Deschanel, New Girl
Julia Louis-Dreyfus, Veep
Lena Dunham, Girls
Tina Fey, 30 Rock
Amy Poehler, Parks and Recreation

Best Actor in a Miniseries or TV Movie

Kevin Costner, Hatfields & McCoys
Benedict Cumberbatch, Sherlock
Woody Harrelson, Game Change
Toby Jones, The Girl
Clive Owen, Hemingway & Gellhorn

Best Actress in a Miniseries or TV Movie

Julianne Moore, Game Change
Nicole Kidman, Hemingway & Gellhorn
Jessica Lange, American Horror Story: Asylum
Sienna Miller, The Girl
Sigourney Weaver, Political Animals

Best Supporting Actor in a Series, Mini-Series or TV Movie

Max Greenfield, New Girl
Ed Harris, Game Change
Danny Huston, Magic City
Mandy Patinkin, Homeland
Eric Stonestreet, Modern Family

Best Supporting Actress in a Series, Miniseries, or TV Movie

Hayden Panettiere, Nashville
Archie Panjabi, The Good Wife
Sarah Paulson, Game Change
Maggie Smith, Downton Abbey
Sofia Vergara, Modern Family

Cecile B. DeMille Award

Jodie Foster